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So basically, I have an abstract class which has a unique, incremental ID - Primitive. When a Primitive (or more precisely, an inheritor of Primitive) is instantiated, the ID is incremented - up to the point where the ID overflows - at which point, I add a message to the exception and rethrow.

OK, that all works fine... but I'm trying to test this functionality and I've never used mocking before. I just need to make enough Primitives for the ID to overflow and assert that it throws at the right time.

  • It is unreasonable to instantiate 2 billion objects to do this! However I don't see another way.
  • I don't know if I'm using mocking correctly? (I'm using Moq.)

Here's my test (xUnit):

[Fact(DisplayName = "Test Primitive count limit")]
public void TestPrimitiveCountLimit()
{
    Assert.Throws(typeof(OverflowException), delegate()
    {
        for (; ; )
        {
            var mock = new Mock<Primitive>();
        }
    });
}

and:

public abstract class Primitive
{
    internal int Id { get; private set; }
    private static int? _previousId;

    protected Primitive()
    {
        try
        {
            _previousId = Id = checked (++_previousId) ?? 0;
        }
        catch (OverflowException ex)
        {
            throw new OverflowException("Cannot instantiate more than (int.MaxValue) unique primitives.", ex);
        }
    }
}

I assume I'm doing it wrong - so how do I test this properly?

share|improve this question
    
Why are you catching the OverflowException and throwing the same exception with a different message? You should simply ignore the condition and let the framework handle it. Exceptions should not be used as "return codes" by a try/catch block. –  Sklivvz Nov 7 '10 at 13:48
    
I figured it would make it easier to fix when something blew up. Maybe a comment would be more appropriate. –  rmx Nov 7 '10 at 13:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You don't need mocking for this. You use mocking when two classes work together and you want to replace one class with a mock (fake) one so you only have to test the other one. This is not the case in your example.

There is however a way you could use mocks, and that fixes your issue with the 2bln instances. If you separate the ID generation from the Primitive class and use a generator, you can mock the generator. An example:

I've changed Primitive to use a provided generator. In this case it's set to a static variable, and there are better ways, but as an example:

public abstract class Primitive
{
    internal static IPrimitiveIDGenerator Generator;

    protected Primitive()
    {
        Id = Generator.GetNext();
    }

    internal int Id { get; private set; }
}

public interface IPrimitiveIDGenerator
{
    int GetNext();
}

public class PrimitiveIDGenerator : IPrimitiveIDGenerator
{
    private int? _previousId;

    public int GetNext()
    {
        try
        {
            _previousId = checked(++_previousId) ?? 0;

            return _previousId.Value;
        }
        catch (OverflowException ex)
        {
            throw new OverflowException("Cannot instantiate more than (int.MaxValue) unique primitives.", ex);
        }
    }
}

Then, your test case becomes:

[Fact(DisplayName = "Test Primitive count limit")]
public void TestPrimitiveCountLimit()
{
    Assert.Throws(typeof(OverflowException), delegate()
    {
        var generator = new PrimitiveIDGenerator();

        for (; ; )
        {
            generator.GetNext();
        }
    });
}

This will run a lot faster and now you're only testing whether the ID generator works.

Now, when you e.g. want to test that creating a new primitive actually asks for the ID, you could try the following:

public void Does_primitive_ask_for_an_ID()
{
    var generator = new Mock<IPrimitiveIDGenerator>();

    // Set the expectations on the mock so that it checks that
    // GetNext is called. How depends on what mock framework you're using.

    Primitive.Generator = generator;

    new ChildOfPrimitive();
}

Now you have separated the different concerns and can test them separately.

share|improve this answer
    
I though of a different idea and expanded my answer. This also solves your 2bln instances. Concerning testing abstract classes: inherit it for the unit test. Just create a dummy inherited class. –  Pieter van Ginkel Nov 7 '10 at 13:39
    
Wow excellent answer. Thank you man. I like the idea of separating the ID generator which I could then reuse somewhere else. I'll need to read up on mocks I think though! –  rmx Nov 7 '10 at 13:47

The point of the mock is to simulate an external resource. It's not what you want, you want to test your object, no mock needed in this szenario. Just instantiate the 2 billion objects if you like to, it doesn't hurt since the GC will throw away the old instances (but may take a while to complete).

Id' actually add another constructor which accepts a strarting value for the identity counter, so that you can actually start close to int.MaxValue and therefore don't need to instatiate as many objects.

Also, just from readin the source I can tell that your object will fail the test. ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
Primitive is abstract, so I can't directly create it. Should I just run the test but instantiating one of the class' children instead? –  rmx Nov 7 '10 at 13:30
    
Just create a PrimitiveTest: Primitive class used by your tests only. –  Lucero Nov 7 '10 at 13:31

You have two problems baked into this question:

  1. How to unit test an abstract class, that you can't instantiate.
  2. How to efficiently unit test functionality that requires two billion instances to be created and destroyed.

I think the solutions are pretty simple, even though you'll have to re-think the structure of your object slightly.

For the first problem, the solution is as simple as adding a fake that inherits Primitive, but adds no functionality, to your test project. You can then instantiate your fake class instead, and you'll still be testing the functionality of Primitive.

public class Fake : Primitive { }

// and in your test...
Assert.Throws(typeof(OverflowException), delegate() { var f = new Fake(int.MaxValue); });

For the second problem, I'd add a constructor that takes an int for the previous ID, and use constructor chaining to "not need it" in your actual code. (But how to you get to know of the previous id otherwise? Can't you set that to int.MaxValue-1 in the setup of your test?) Think of it as dependecy injection, but you're not injecting anything complex; you're just injecting a simple int. It could be something along these lines:

public abstract class Primitive
{
internal int Id { get; private set; }
private static int? _previousId;

protected Primitive() : Primitive([some way you get your previous id now...])
protected Primitive(int previousId)
{
    _previousId = previousId;
    try
    {
        _previousId = Id = checked (++_previousId) ?? 0;
    }
    catch (OverflowException ex)
    {
        throw new OverflowException("Cannot instantiate more than (int.MaxValue) unique primitives.", ex);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I see where youre coming from and it could work. I do prefer Pieter's answer, but thank you. –  rmx Nov 7 '10 at 13:52
    
Pieter's answer is in fact better, because he does not only do some necessary restructuring of your object, but also separates concerns in a nice way. –  Tomas Lycken Nov 10 '10 at 14:55

All has been said in the other answers. I just want to show you an alternative, maybe this is somehow interesting for you.

If you made the _previousId field of your Primitive class internal (and included the respective InternalsVisibleTo attribute, of course), then your test could be as simple as this with the Typemock Isolator tool:

[Fact(DisplayName = "Test Primitive count limit"), Isolated]
public void TestPrimitiveCountLimit()
{
    Primitive._previousId = int.MaxValue;

    Assert.Throws<OverflowException>(() => 
        Isolate.Fake.Instance<Primitive>(Members.CallOriginal, ConstructorWillBe.Called));
}

Sure, Typemock comes with some license costs, but it definitely makes life much easier and saves you a lot of time, if you have to write large amounts of test code - especially on systems which are not easily tested or are even impossible to test with a free mocking framework.

Thomas

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