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I'm wriging a wrapper for C++ of a function declared in this way:

class MyClass
{
public:
  template <class T>
  T& as();
};

My wrapper needs to eliminate the explicit template because I don't want to call myClass.as<int>();

So I tried to implement a new function declared in this way:

class MyClass2 : public MyClass
{
public:
  template <class T>
  void get(T & val);
};

In this way I can call

int a;
myClass2.get(a);

Is there a way to implement this function, so the type is passed at runtime according to the parameter type? Something like:

template <class T>
void MyClass2::get(T & val)
{
  val = as< typeof(val) >();  /* Of course typeof does not exist */
}

Thank you very much for your help.

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It sounds a little bit like you want to make a template type at run time? Which as far as I know, you can't do that –  thecoshman Nov 7 '10 at 13:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This does not make sense. Why not just write:

template <class T>
void MyClass2::get(T & val)
{
  val = as< T >();
}

Since the type is a template-parameter, you need no typeof.

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thank you very much! my question was actually quite silly :) –  yelo3 Nov 7 '10 at 13:46
1  
@yelo3: Sometimes it helps just to write it down and then read it loud to yourself :). Also, please accept the answer as correct if it is. –  Björn Pollex Nov 7 '10 at 13:48

As @Space_C0wb0y already pointed out, this isn't actually necessary. The template type is automatically inferred from the parameter.

However, C++0x does actually add what you asked for, in that it would let you write:

template <class T>
void MyClass2::get(T & val)
{
  val = as< decltype(val) >();  /* typeof does not exist. But decltype does */
}

of course, in this case it's just a more complex way to solve a non-existent problem. But I thought I'd demonstrate it anyway, because it is so similar to the pseudocode you posted in the question.

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