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This is in continuation with the question posted here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/408358/finding-the-center-of-mass-on-a-2d-bitmap which talked about finding the center of mass in a boolean matrix, as the example was given.

Suppose now we expand the matrix to this form:

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 . X X . . . . . .
2 . X X X . . X . .
3 . . . . . X X X .
4 . . . . . . X . .
5 . X X . . . . . .
6 . X . . . . . . .
7 . X . . . . . . .
8 . . . . X X . . .
9 . . . . X X . . .

As you can see we now have 4 centers of mass, for 4 different clusters.

We already know how to find a center of mass given that only one exists, if we run that algorithm on this matrix we'll get some point in the middle of the matrix which does not help us.

What can be a good, correct and fast algorithm to find these clusters of mass?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think I would check each point in the matrix and figure out it's mass based on it's neighbours. The mass for points would fall with say the square of the distance. You could then pick the top four points with a minimum distance from each other.

Here's some Python code I whipped together to try to illustrate the approach for finding out the mass for each point. Some setup using your example matrix:

matrix = [[1.0 if x == "X" else 0.0 for x in y] for y in """.XX......
.XXX..X..
.....XXX.
......X..
.XX......
.X.......
.X.......
....XX...
....XX...""".split("\n")]

HEIGHT = len(matrix)
WIDTH = len(matrix[0])
Y_RADIUS = HEIGHT / 2
X_RADIUS = WIDTH / 2

To calculate the mass for a given point:

def distance(x1, y1, x2, y2):
  'Manhattan distance http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manhattan_distance'
  return abs(y1 - y2) + abs(x1 - x2)

def mass(m, x, y):
  _mass = m[y][x]
  for _y in range(max(0, y - Y_RADIUS), min(HEIGHT, y + Y_RADIUS)):
    for _x in range(max(0, x - X_RADIUS), min(WIDTH, x + X_RADIUS)):
      d = max(1, distance(x, y, _x, _y))
      _mass += m[_y][_x] / (d * d)
  return _mass

Note: I'm using Manhattan distances (a k a Cityblock, a k a Taxicab Geometry) here because I don't think the added accuracy using Euclidian distances is worth the cost of calling sqrt().

Iterating through our matrix and building up a list of tuples like (x, y, mass(x,y)):

point_mass = []
for y in range(0, HEIGHT):
  for x in range(0, WIDTH):
    point_mass.append((x, y, mass(matrix, x, y)))

Sorting the list on the mass for each point:

from operator import itemgetter
point_mass.sort(key=itemgetter(2), reverse=True)

Looking at the top 9 points in that sorted list:

(6, 2, 6.1580555555555554)
(2, 1, 5.4861111111111107)
(1, 1, 4.6736111111111107)
(1, 4, 4.5938888888888885)
(2, 0, 4.54)
(4, 7, 4.4480555555555554)
(1, 5, 4.4480555555555554)
(5, 7, 4.4059637188208614)
(4, 8, 4.3659637188208613)

If we would work from highest to lowest and filter away points that are too close to already seen points we'll get (I'm doing it manually since I've run out of time now to do it in code...):

(6, 2, 6.1580555555555554)
(2, 1, 5.4861111111111107)
(1, 4, 4.5938888888888885)
(4, 7, 4.4480555555555554)

Which is a pretty intuitive result from just looking at your matrix (note that the coordinates are zero based when comparing with your example).

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You need a clustering algorithm, this is easy since you just have a 2 dimensional grid, and the entries are bordering each other. You can just use a floodfill algorithm. Once you have each cluster, you can find the center as in the 2D center of mass article..

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Here's a similar question with a not so fast algorithm, and several other better ways to do it.

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My first thought would be to first find any cell with a non-zero value. From there do some flood-fill algorithm, and compute the center of mass of the cells found. Next zero out the found cells from the matrix, and start over from the top.

This would of course not scale as well as the method from Google, that tuinstoel linked, but would be easier to implement for smaller matrices.

EDIT:

Disjoint sets (using path compression and union-by-rank) could be useful here. They have O(α(n)) time complexity for union and find-set, where

α(n) = min { k : Ak(1) ≥ n }.

Ak(n) is the Ackerman function, so α(n) will essentially be O(1) for any reasonable values. The only problem is that disjoint sets are a one-way mapping of item to set, but this won't matter if you are going trough all items.

Here is a simple python script for demonstration:

from collections import defaultdict

class DisjointSets(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.item_map = defaultdict(DisjointNode)

    def add(self,item):
        """Add item to the forest."""
        # It's gets initialized to a new node when
        # trying to access a non-existant item.
        return self.item_map[item]

    def __contains__(self,item):
        return (item in self.item_map)

    def __getitem__(self,item):
        if item not in self:
            raise KeyError
        return self.item_map[item]

    def __delitem__(self,item):
        del self.item_map[item]

    def __iter__(self):
        # sort all items into real sets
        all_sets = defaultdict(set)
        for item,node in self.item_map.iteritems():
            all_sets[node.find_set()].add(item)
        return all_sets.itervalues()

class DisjointNode(object):
    def __init__(self,parent=None,rank=0):
        if parent is None:
            self.parent = self
        else:
            self.parent = parent
        self.rank = rank

    def union(self,other):
        """Join two sets."""
        node1 = self.find_set()
        node2 = other.find_set()
        # union by rank
        if node1.rank > node2.rank:
            node2.parent = node1
        else:
            node1.parent = node2
            if node1.rank == node2.rank:
                node2.rank += 1
        return node1

    def find_set(self):
        """Finds the root node of this set."""
        node = self
        while node is not node.parent:
            node = node.parent
        # path compression
        root, node = node, self
        while node is not node.parent:
            node, node.parent = node.parent, root
        return root

def find_clusters(grid):
    disj = DisjointSets()
    for y,row in enumerate(grid):
        for x,cell in enumerate(row):
            if cell:
                node = disj.add((x,y))
                for dx,dy in ((-1,0),(-1,-1),(0,-1),(1,-1)):
                    if (x+dx,y+dy) in disj:
                        node.union(disj[x+dx,y+dy])
    for index,set_ in enumerate(disj):
        sum_x, sum_y, count = 0, 0, 0
        for x,y in set_:
            sum_x += x
            sum_y += y
            count += 1
        yield 1.0 * sum_x / count, 1.0 * sum_y / count

def main():
    grid = [[('.' != cell) for cell in row if not cell.isspace()] for row in (
        ". X X . . . . . .",
        ". X X X . . X . .",
        ". . . . . X X X .",
        ". . . . . . X . .",
        ". X X . . . . . .",
        ". X . . . . . . .",
        ". X . . . . . . .",
        ". . . . X X . . .",
        ". . . . X X . . .",
    )]
    coordinates = list(find_clusters(grid))
    centers = dict(((round(x),round(y)),i) for i,(x,y) in enumerate(coordinates))
    for y,row in enumerate(grid):
        for x,cell in enumerate(row):
            if (x,y) in centers:
                print centers[x,y]+1,
            elif cell:
                print 'X',
            else:
                print '.',
        print
    print
    print '%4s | %7s %7s' % ('i','x','y')
    print '-'*22
    for i,(x,y) in enumerate(coordinates):
        print '%4d | %7.4f %7.4f' % (i+1,x,y)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

Output:

. X X . . . . . .
. X 3 X . . X . .
. . . . . X 4 X .
. . . . . . X . .
. X X . . . . . .
. 2 . . . . . . .
. X . . . . . . .
. . . . X X . . .
. . . . X 1 . . .

   i |       x       y
----------------------
   1 |  4.5000  7.5000
   2 |  1.2500  4.7500
   3 |  1.8000  0.6000
   4 |  6.0000  2.0000

The point of this was to demonstrate disjoint sets. The actual algorithm in find_clusters() could be upgraded to something more robust.

References

  • Introduction to algorithms. 2nd ed. Cormen et.al.
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