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Can anybody let me know that what does SET ANSI NULLS ON do .

Thanks, Chris

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3 Answers 3

From MSDN:

The SQL-92 standard requires that an equals (=) or not equal to (<>) comparison against a null value evaluates to FALSE. When SET ANSI_NULLS is ON, a SELECT statement using WHERE column_name = NULL returns zero rows even if there are null values in column_name. A SELECT statement using WHERE column_name <> NULL returns zero rows even if there are nonnull values in column_name.

When SET ANSI_NULLS is OFF, the Equals (=) and Not Equal To (<>) comparison operators do not follow the SQL-92 standard. A SELECT statement using WHERE column_name = NULL returns the rows with null values in column_name. A SELECT statement using WHERE column_name <> NULL returns the rows with nonnull values in the column. In addition, a SELECT statement using WHERE column_name <> XYZ_value returns all rows that are not XYZ value and that are not NULL.

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The very first result in a Google search for SET ANSI NULLS ON. You'd think it'd be quicker to search for it than post a question here. –  Matt Hamilton Jan 4 '09 at 23:05
    
That's exactly how I found it myself. :D –  dkretz Jan 4 '09 at 23:06
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This answer shouldn't be up-voted, until it's fixed - it shouldn't just link to the information, it should also quote it. Isn't it the point of SO? –  Paulius Jan 4 '09 at 23:07
    
I agree in principle, Paulius, and haven't up-voted it myself, but when someone asks a question that can be so well documented and easily found on Google, I dunno that it's necessary to duplicate the answer here. –  Matt Hamilton Jan 4 '09 at 23:17
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@Matt: unless the resource linked to goes away. Not likely in the case of MSDN, but in other cases maybe. I usually try to write answers as stand-alone, and use links for further reading or as supportive documentation. –  Bill Karwin Jan 4 '09 at 23:44

It changes the way NULLs behave. NULLs in ANSI yield things like

NULL = NULL -> false

NULL <> NULL -> false

With ANSI off, (NULL = NULL) -> true.

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When on then It don’t count the Null Values and return 0.

When this is on, any query that compares a value with a null returns a 0

Example: SET ANSI_NULLS ON SELECT empname FROM emp1 WHERE phone=NULL

Explanation: It will return nothing because SET ANSI_NULLS is ON.

Source:

http://www.xpode.com/ShowArticle.aspx?ArticleId=599

Thanks,

Rohit

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