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I have a Flash game I made way back in 2008. It runs super fast these days. Way too fast in fact. I have it set to 60fps in FlashDevelop, but I think that is just limiting the amount of draw calls. I think my logic is executing well past 60 times a second these days. I haven't done ActionScript in a while, but I noticed that I am using an enterFrameHandler that executes my logic loop. It seems to have no constraint set on it. It just fires away as it is called I believe. Is there any way I can cap it at 30 or 60fps? I would greatly appreciate any help or ideas. My game is ruined if the logic runs too fast :(

UPDATE As some ActionScript knowledge is coming back to me I just thought of something. Isn't the enterFrameHandler bound by what the fps is set to in Flash or FlashDevelop under project properties? Can anybody confirm this? It would mean my draw calls and logic calls are 1:1 right?

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As a side comment, if someone wanted to slow it down locally, they can use Cheat Engine's speedhack feature. As for doing it for your flash game release, I have no idea. –  LostInTheCode Nov 7 '10 at 16:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Indeed, enterFrame handlers are only called when it's rendering the frame (at 60Hz in your case).

If you can limit the number of times something is executed by measuring the time. Something like this:

// A property to store the last time the code was executed
protected var lastTimeCalled:int;

// Inside your enterFrame handler
protected function onEnterFrameHandler(e:Event): void {
    var ti:int = getTimer(); // Get current time
    var desiredFPS:Number = 60; // Actual framerate you want
    var frameInterval:Number = 1000 / desiredFPS; // Desired ms per frame

    if (isNaN(lastTimeCalled) || ti >= lastTimeCalled + frameInterval) {
        // Execute code here
        ...

        // Increase time (by chunks of fixed size for framerate self-adjustment)
        lastTimeCalled = isNaN(lastTimeCalled) ? ti : lastTimeCalled + frameInterval;
    }
}

Notice, though, that if your SWF's framerate is set to 60, trying to set desiredFPS to 60 won't do a thing; it'll probably just cause some frames to be dropped. It may be a good way to test if your enterFrame handler is getting called somewhere else though.

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I experimented with changing my fps from 60 to 45 and 30 and it seems to work perfectly. I think it was just an illusion that my game logic appeared to be executing faster than the draw calls. I think I am good to go. Is your code referring to a way to ensure my game logic loop is executing evenly no matter if my frame-rate is high or low? –  Bluebomber357 Nov 7 '10 at 17:54
    
Zeh's code is a way of doing your game logic inside the frame event, but skip it if the previous event was very recent. (Incidentally at first glance it would need some tweaking to work correctly - if you published at 60fps and set the desired fps to 45, this code would just skip every other frame and you'd be left with 30fps.) –  fenomas Nov 8 '10 at 8:20
    
But in any case, doing your logic in the frame event and lowering the published FPS is definitely the simplest and most straightforward way to solve your problem. If you publish at 45fps and the machine is capable of 60, then this way the Flash Player handles the specifics of how the speed gets throttled evenly. –  fenomas Nov 8 '10 at 8:21
    
fenomas: no, the code is correctly written to adapt to those situations (look at the last line of code closely). If you publish at 60fps and set desiredFPS to 45, it'd run the enterFrame handler block at 45 (on average) and not at 30fps - give it a try. –  zeh Nov 8 '10 at 14:38
    
user464095: the code is only ensuring that your logic will not run more than necessary; it's basically capping the execution. If you publish your SWF at 50fps but set desiredFPS to 60, it's still gonna run at 50 since it's still limited by the number of calls done to the event handler. It's avoiding surplus execution, but it can't force additional calls when needed (not with this code at least). –  zeh Nov 8 '10 at 14:39

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