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I need to verify an /etc/passwd file is valid, and thought regex would be a good idea to verify the lines that are not comments. How would I verify a line like:

root:*:0:0:System Administrator:/var/root:/bin/sh 

After some research, the 5th field (System administrator) can contain other data like email and address, the second field could contain anything but a :, the last 2 fields are full paths.

Any clues how I would create a regex expression for this?

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The passwd manpage states: “The password files should never be edited by hand; vipw (8) should be used instead.” –  tchrist Nov 7 '10 at 21:10

4 Answers 4

up vote -2 down vote accepted

Something like this?

^(#.*|[a-z]*:[^:]*:[0-9]*:[0-9]*:[^:]*:/[^:]*:/[^:]*)$

(assuming that the username consists of lowercase letters)

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1  
That pattern is incorrect. It validates malformed password entries. That is a very bad thing. –  tchrist Nov 7 '10 at 21:11
    
@tchrist: I don't know exactly what forms password entries can have, so please change it yourself. –  thejh Nov 7 '10 at 21:14
    
⁠ ⁠ ⁠Done. –  tchrist Nov 7 '10 at 22:54

without wishing to be facetious - Passwd::Unix is probably your best bet.

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You certainly get my upvote. Some higher level abstraction seems critical. No matter what, I am really, really nervous about touching the passwd file. Its manpage says never to use anything to change it except for vipw, whose source is very careful. This is too important to risk screwing up. –  tchrist Nov 8 '10 at 0:22

Do you need to use Perl? The normal way to inspect the password file is using awk as a database query language. For example:

awk -F: '$3 ~ /pattern/'

Of course, you could use perl -lane instead. But if you’re using Perl, you should probably be using the standard User::pwent module.

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Wouldn't User::pwent presumably end up hiding whatever flaws there are? (I'm not sure exactly why the OP is trying to verify /etc/passwd; seems an odd thing to do) –  ysth Nov 7 '10 at 19:59
    
Oh right, it would. You should be a lot more careful than this if you’re doing /etc/passwd validation!! I’m pretty sure that passwd (5) doesn’t allow /^#/ comments, either, although it does get fancier with YP. –  tchrist Nov 7 '10 at 20:36

You want a regular expression? Ok fine then, I’ll give you a regular expression: it’s in the $is_valid_pwent_rx variable.

Enjoy.

IMPORTANT: This must not be misconstrued to be a semantic checker of a sane passwd file. It is a syntactic checker only.

Currently configured for OpenBSD.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use 5.010;
use strict;
use warnings;

our $PASSWD = "/etc/passwd";

our $Errors = 0;

sub is_valid_pwent(_);
sub main();

#########################################################

main();
exit($Errors != 0);

#########################################################

sub main() {

    open(PASSWD)        || die "can't open $PASSWD: $!";

    while (my $line = <PASSWD>) {
        chomp $line;
        ## NEXT LINE IS WRONG: NO "COMMENTS" ALLOWED!!!
        next if $line =~ /^#/;
        next if is_valid_pwent($line);   
        say "$0: Invalid entry at $PASSWD $.: $line";
        $Errors++;
    }

    close(PASSWD)       || die "can't close $PASSWD: $!";

    say "$0: $PASSWD appears ok." unless $Errors;
}

#########################################################

INIT {

    state $is_valid_pwent_rx = qr{

      ^ (?&any_pwent)  $

###############################################

      (?(DEFINE)

      (?<any_pwent>     (?&yp_pwent) | (?&pwent) )

# The `+' token may also be alone in the name field, which causes all users
# from the passwd.byname and passwd.byuid YP maps to be included.
#
# If the entry contains non-empty uid or gid fields, the specified numbers
# will override the information retrieved from the YP maps.  Additionally,
# if the gecos, dir, or shell entries contain text, it will override the
# information included via YP.  On some systems, the passwd field may also
# be overridden.  It is recommended that the standard way to enable YP
# passwd support in /etc/master.passwd is:
#
#     +:*::::::::   

        (?<yp_pwent>
                       (?&PLUS)         # substitute in YP
         : (?&EMPTY) | (?&pw_passwd)    # user's encrypted password.
         : (?&EMPTY) | (?&pw_uid)       # user's login user ID.
         : (?&EMPTY) | (?&pw_gid)       # user's login group ID.
         : (?&EMPTY) | (?&pw_gecos)     # Honeywell login info.
         : (?&EMPTY) | (?&pw_dir)       # user's home directory.
         : (?&EMPTY) | (?&pw_shell)     # user's login shell.
        )

# A normal password entry

        (?<pwent>

           (?&pw_name)      # user's login name.
         : (?&pw_passwd)    # user's encrypted password.
         : (?&pw_uid)       # user's login user ID.
         : (?&pw_gid)       # user's login group ID.
         : (?&pw_gecos)     # Honeywell login info.
         : (?&pw_dir)       # user's home directory.
         : (?&pw_shell)     # user's login shell.
        )

# A master password entry

        (?<master_pwent>
           (?&pw_name)      # user's login name.
         : (?&pw_passwd)    # user's encrypted password.
         : (?&pw_uid)       # user's login user ID.
         : (?&pw_gid)       # user's login group ID.
         : (?&pw_class)     # user's general classification (see login.conf(5))
         : (?&pw_change)    # password change time.
         : (?&pw_expire)    # account expiration time.
         : (?&pw_gecos)     # general information about the user.
         : (?&pw_dir)       # user's home directory.
         : (?&pw_shell)     # user's login shell.
        )

# The name field is the login used to access the computer account, and the
# uid field is the number associated with it.  They should both be unique
# across the system (and often across a group of systems) since they con-
# trol file access.
#
# While it is possible to have multiple entries with identical login names
# and/or identical user IDs, it is usually a mistake to do so.  Routines
# that manipulate these files will often return only one of the multiple
# entries, and that one by random selection.
#
# The login name may be up to 31 characters long.  For compatibility with
# legacy software, a login name should start with a letter and consist
# solely of letters, numbers, dashes and underscores.  The login name must
# never begin with a hyphen (`-'); also, it is strongly suggested that nei-
# ther uppercase characters nor dots (`.') be part of the name, as this
# tends to confuse mailers.  No field may contain a colon as this has been
# used historically to separate the fields in the user database.

        (?<pw_name>

            (?= (?&NON_COLON){1,31} )

            (?: (?&UNDERSCORE)
              | (?&LETTER)
            )

            (?: (?&LETTER)
              | (?&number)
              | (?&HYPHEN)
              | (?&UNDERSCORE)
            ){0,30}

        )

# The password field is the *encrypted* form of the password.  If the
# password field is empty, no password will be required to gain access to 
# the machine.  This is almost invariably a mistake.  By convention, ac-  
# counts that are not intended to be logged in to (e.g. bin, daemon, sshd)
# have a star (`*') in the password field.  Note that there is nothing spe-
# cial about `*', it is just one of many strings that is not a valid en-
# crypted password (see crypt(3)).  Because master.passwd contains the en-
# crypted user passwords, it should not be readable by anyone without ap-
# propriate privileges.
#
# Which type of cipher is used to encrypt the password information depends
# on the configuration in login.conf(5).  It can be different for local and
# YP passwords.

        (?<pw_passwd>
            (?&STAR)
          | (?&NON_COLON) +
          | (?&EMPTY)           # should not allow this!
        )

# The uid field is the numeric user ID assigned to this login name.
# It need not strictly be unique.

        (?<pw_uid>
            (?&number) +
        )

# The group (gid) field is the group that the user will be placed in
# upon login. Since this system supports multiple groups (see groups(1))
# this field currently has little special meaning.

        (?<pw_gid>
            (?&number) +
        )

        (?<pw_class>
            (?&EMPTY)   
          | (?&any_text)
        )

        (?<pw_change>
            (?&EMPTY)
          | (?&number)
        )

        (?<pw_expire>
            (?&EMPTY)
          | (?&number)
        )

        (?<pw_gecos>
            # (?&EMPTY) | (?&gecos_fields)
            (?&any_text)
        )

        # some have an extra field in them after hphone
        (?<gecos_fields>
            (?&gecos_name)   # User's full name.
            (?&COMMA)
            (?&gecos_office) # User's office location.
            (?&COMMA)
            (?&gecos_wphone) # User's work phone number.
            (?&COMMA)
            (?&gecos_hphone) # User's home phone number.
          )

        (?<gecos_name>      (?&gecos_text)  )
        (?<gecos_office>    (?&gecos_text)  )
        (?<gecos_wphone>    (?&gecos_text)  )
        (?<gecos_hphone>    (?&gecos_text)  )

        (?<pw_dir>
            (?&EMPTY)   # bad idea
          | (?&directory_name)
        )

        (?<pw_shell>
            (?&EMPTY)   # means "/bin/sh"
          | (?&filename)

        )

#########################

        (?<directory_name>      (?&pathname)    )
        (?<filename>            (?&pathname)    )

        (?<pathname>
            (?&SLASH)
            (?&any_text)
        )

        (?<LETTER>      [a-z]       )  # \p{Ll} && \p{ASCII}

        (?<DIGIT>       [0-9]       )  # \p{Nd} && \p{ASCII}
        (?<ZERO>         0          )
        (?<NON_ZERO>    [1-9]       )

        (?<PLUS>        \x2B        )  # PLUS SIGN
        (?<COMMA>       \x2C        )  # COMMA
        (?<HYPHEN>      \x2D        )  # HYPHEN-MINUS   
        (?<SLASH>       \x2F        )  # SOLIDUS
        (?<COLON>       \x3A        )  # COLON
        (?<STAR>        \x2A        )  # ASTERISK
        (?<UNDERSCORE>  \x5F        )  # LOW LINE

        (?<NON_COLON> [^\x3A]       )

        (?<EMPTY> (?# this space intentionally left blank) )

        (?<number>
            (?&ZERO)
          | (?&NON_ZERO) (?&DIGIT) *
        )

        (?<any_text>
            (?&NON_COLON) *
        )

        (?<gecos_text>  
            (?:
                (?! (?&COMMA) )
                (?! (?&COLON) )
                .
            ) *
        )

      )

    }x;

    sub is_valid_pwent(_) {
        my $pwent = shift();
        return $pwent =~ $is_valid_pwent_rx;
    }

}
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