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I need to call automatically base class method when calling overriden one (like constructors call base). For example:

class A
{
    public void Fun()
    {
        Console.Write("Class A!");
    }
}

class B : A
{
    public void Fun()
    {
        Console.Write("Class B!");
    }
}

I want to see on the screen

Class A! Class B!

when executing next code:

B b = new B();
b.Fun();

Could anyone tell me please what need to change in example code or how better to write to get required result? Thanks.

share|improve this question
up vote 17 down vote accepted

If you don't want to call it explicitly and therefore ensure A.Fun() is called in the derived class, you could use something called the template method pattern:

class A
{
    public void Fun()
    {
        Console.Write("Class A!");
        FunProtected();
    }

    protected virtual void FunProtected()
    {
    }
}

class B : A
{
    protected override void FunProtected()
    {
        Console.Write("Class B!");
    }
}

This would give you:

new A().Fun() -> "Class A!"
new B().Fun() -> "Class A! Class B!"
share|improve this answer
    
@Kirkham Thanks for correcting my spelling and clarifying my answer :) – Lasse Espeholt Nov 7 '10 at 18:06
2  
+1 for protected fun. You never know what's around... – Mat's Mug Apr 24 '13 at 0:58

If you want such behavior you will need to change platform/language. .NET doesn't automatically call the base method. You need to call it explicitly. Also your method needs to be virtual or you will be hiding it in the derived class:

class A
{
    public virtual void Fun()
    {
        Console.Write("Class A!");
    }
}

class B : A
{
    public override void Fun()
    {
        // call the base method which will print Class A!
        base.Fun(); 
        Console.Write("Class B!");
    }
}

Now when you do this:

B b = new B();
b.Fun();

you will get the required result.

share|improve this answer
    
"Also you method needs to be virtual or you will be hiding it in the derived class" For the behaviour the poster wants, I'm not sure it needs to be virtual. – strager Nov 7 '10 at 18:00
1  
@strager, you'll get a compiler warning if it is not virtual. – Darin Dimitrov Nov 7 '10 at 18:01
1  
you can use the new keyword to get rid of the warning while not using virtual methods. – Pauli Østerø Nov 7 '10 at 18:20
    
@BurningIce, Correct, and this is what you probably should do. @Darin Dimitrov, The desired behaviour and virtual methods are orthogonal; virtual methods have nothing to do with the problem. – strager Nov 7 '10 at 19:59

Can still be so:

interface IFun
{
    void Fun();
}

abstract class A : IFun
{
    void IFun.Fun()
    {
        Console.Write("Class A!");
        Fun();
    }
    protected abstract void Fun();
}

class B : A
{
    protected override void Fun()
    {
        Console.Write("Class B!");
    }
}

IFun b = new B();
b.Fun();

This works if object reference is IFun.

share|improve this answer
    
But I can't create an instance of A class that way. And good answer was given already. – kirmir May 20 '11 at 10:21

Just for reference, you could use a wrapper pattern that puts an A inside a B. Here is a crude example!

interface IFunClass {
    void Fun();
}

class A : IFunClass {
    public void IFunClass.Fun() {
        Console.Write("Class A!");
    }
}

class B : IFunClass {
    public B(IFunClass f) {
        this.m_SomethingFun = f;
    }

    public void IFunClass.Fun() {

        this.m_SomethingFun.Fun();

        Console.Write("Class B!");
    }

    private IFunClass m_SomethingFun;
}

A a = new A();
B b = new B(a);

b.Fun() // will call a.Fun() first inside b.Fun()
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