Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

hi I want to "hook" another application so when it closes I can close my application.

I don't want to poll the running process as this seems unnecessarily intensive, if I want to respond in real-time.

I believe apps send out message within windows when they are created or closed etc how can I hook this to know when it closes?

for example lets say my app loads checks running processes to ensure notepad is loaded and if so it remains loaded until notepad is closed. as notepad is closed my app some how knows this and exits...

is this possible if so how?

it needs to work on xp vista and win7

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you have the Process instance for the running application you can use Process.WaitForExit which will block until the process is closed. Of course you can put the WaitForExit in another thread so that your main thread does not block.

Here is an example, not using a separate thread

Process[] processes = Process.GetProcessesByName("notepad");
if (processes.Length > 0)
{
  processes[0].WaitForExit();
}

Here is a simple version using a thread to monitor the process.

public static class ProcessMonitor
{
  public static event EventHandler ProcessClosed;

  public static void MonitorForExit(Process process)
  {
    Thread thread = new Thread(() =>
    {
      process.WaitForExit();
      OnProcessClosed(EventArgs.Empty);
    });
    thread.Start();      
  }

  private static void OnProcessClosed(EventArgs e)
  {
    if (ProcessClosed != null)
    {
      ProcessClosed(null, e);
    }
  }
}

The following Console code is an example of how the above can be used. This would work equally well in a WPF or WinForms app of course, BUT remember that for UI you cannot update the UI directly from the event callback because it it run in a separate thread from the UI thread. There are plenty of examples here on stackoverflow explaining how to update UI for WinForms and WPF from a non-UI thread.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
  // Wire up the event handler for the ProcessClosed event
  ProcessMonitor.ProcessClosed += new EventHandler((s,e) =>
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Process Closed");
  });

  Process[] processes = Process.GetProcessesByName("notepad");
  if (processes.Length > 0)
  {
    ProcessMonitor.MonitorForExit(processes[0]);
  }
  else
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Process not running");        
  }
  Console.ReadKey(true);
}
share|improve this answer
    
WaitForExit steel uses poll –  Saeed Amiri Nov 7 '10 at 18:59
2  
@SaeedAlg, WaitForExit calles WaitOne on the WaitHandle of the process intenally it is an instance of ProcessWaitHandle. So basically uses the operating system functionality of waiting for the process handle to become signaled when the process is closed. –  Chris Taylor Nov 7 '10 at 19:06
    
Hi Chris thanks for this I'm new to c# and have thus far avoided using multiple threads! guess I will now need to look at that... any chance of how I would do this on another thread and raise an event... –  Adrian Nov 7 '10 at 19:11
    
@Adrian, I have updated the answer with a simplistic example of using a thread for this. –  Chris Taylor Nov 7 '10 at 19:32
    
@Chris Taylor, I think it try to check MSMQ messages, if is not you are right, do you have any reference to see how it works exactly, thanks in advance. –  Saeed Amiri Nov 7 '10 at 19:40

That is easily possible because in Window's a process handle is waitable. Use the Process class to get the process's Handle.

Then use that to construct a SafeHandle, create a WaitHandle. Either wait on that yourself or register with ThreadPool.RegisterWaitForSingleObject() to get a call back when the process closes.

share|improve this answer
    
that is a good idea. Keep in mind that when the WaitHandle derived class should duplicate the process handle otherwise things will be very unreliable, this would require some additional P/Invoke to kernel32 DuplicteHandle method. –  Chris Taylor Nov 7 '10 at 19:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.