Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
How do you split a list into evenly sized chunks in Python?

Given (any) list of words lst I should divide it into 10 equal parts.

x = len(lst)/10

how to give these parts variable names?

In the output I need 10 variables (part1, part2... part10) with x number of words in it.

any ideas?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by katrielalex, J.F. Sebastian, KennyTM, Björn Pollex, Jeff Mercado Nov 7 '10 at 18:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
You don't give the parts names. You return a list of lists. –  delnan Nov 7 '10 at 18:40
    
How to split? [1,2,3,4,5,...100] becomes [1,2,3,...],[11,12,13,...],... or [1,11,21,...],[2,12,22,...],... or random or what? –  KennyTM Nov 7 '10 at 18:42
    
Why not a tuple or another list, which will contain the sub-lists? And then refer using the position? It would be more dynamic then using variables. <PRE> res = divide_list(l, 10) print res[0] </PRE> –  khachik Nov 7 '10 at 18:43

4 Answers 4

One-liner returning a list of lists, given a list and the chunk size:

>>> lol = lambda lst, sz: [lst[i:i+sz] for i in range(0, len(lst), sz)]

Testing:

>>> x = range(20, 36)
>>> print x
[20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35]

>>> lol(x, 4)
[[20, 21, 22, 23], 
 [24, 25, 26, 27], 
 [28, 29, 30, 31], 
 [32, 33, 34, 35]]

>>> lol(x, 7)
[[20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26], 
 [27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33], 
 [34, 35]]
share|improve this answer

Use tuple/list a result - the most reasonable approach

If you need to define new variables, you can

  1. use setattr and add new attributes to any object. It is safe since you won't overwrite existing variables:
    res = object()
    ...
    setattr(res, "part"+index, part_generated)
    
  2. add generated variables to locals() or globals() dictionary depending on the context your code is running in.
share|improve this answer

I'll write this code so you learn the technique, but you shouldn't do this. The point of container datatypes like list and set is that you can have arbitrary contents without having to make variables for each elements. So,

Don't do this

>>> def chunks(l, n):
...     for i in xrange(0, len(l), n):
...         yield l[i:i+n]
...
>>> for i, chunk in enumerate(chunks(range(100), 10)):
...     locals()["part{0}".format(i)] = chunk
...
>>> part0
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
>>> part1
[10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19]
>>> part2
[20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29]

(The chunks recipe is from Ned Batchelder's answer in the linked question. The reason you shouldn't do this is that modifying locals (or indeed globals or vars) is not good practice: it causes hard-to-determine behaviour and possibly very nasty bugs.

share|improve this answer
1  
chunks doesn't divide l into n parts, it divides l into len(l)/n + 1 parts if len(l)%n != 0 or len(l)/n parts if len(l)%n == 0. –  khachik Nov 7 '10 at 19:15

See this question for how to generate equal chunks of a list. Then, if you really need them in separate variables, you can do:

part1, part2, ..., part10 = (part for part in chunks(lst, len(lst)/10))

But I would recommend making the code more general, instead of hardcoding it to 10 parts.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.