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I'm trying to make a function in Clojure that is local to the body of a (let ...) function. I tried the following, but (defn ...) defines things in the global namespace.

(let [] (defn power [base exp]
      (if (= exp 0)
        1
        (if (> exp 0)
          ; Exponent greater than 0                                           
          (* base (power base   (- exp 1)))
          ; Exponent less than 0                                              
      (/ (power base (+ exp 1)) base))))
 (println (power -2 3)))

; Function call outside of let body
(println (power -2 3))

Now, I also tried:

(let [power (fn [base exp]
      (if (= exp 0)
        1
        (if (> exp 0)
          ; Exponent greater than 0                                           
      (* base (power base (- exp 1)))
          ; Exponent less than 0                                              
      (/ (power base (+ exp 1)) base))))]
 (println (power -2 3)))

; Function call outside of let body
(println (power -2 3))

But then I get the error:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.Exception: Unable to resolve symbol: power in this         context (math.clj:6)

How do I make a function whose namespace is local to the let body and can recursively call itself?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

For this you can use letfn:

 (letfn [(power [base exp]
               (cond 
                 (= exp 0) 
                 1
                 (> exp 0) ; Exponent greater than 0                              
                 (* base (power base (dec exp)))
                 :else ; Exponent less than 0                                     
                 (/ (power base (inc exp)) base)))]
      (print (power -2 3)))

Note that I also changed your nested if-construction to cond, I think it is more readable. Also I changed (+ exp 1) and (- exp 1) to (inc exp) and (dec exp) respectively. You can even improve your function more like using recur and an accumulator argument, but maybe that goes beyond the scope of your question. Also see Brian Carper's comment below.

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(= exp 0) => (zero? exp); (> exp 0) => (pos? exp); (< exp 0) => (neg? exp) –  Brian Carper Nov 10 '10 at 0:38
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letfn is the best solution for your particular case. However, you can also created a named "anonymous" function like so:

(let [power (fn power [base exp] ...)]
  (println (power -2 3)))

However, this style doesn't allow for mutually recursive functions, which letfn does.

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No. This is not what letfn expands to. letfn allows for mutually recursive functions, which this style does not. –  kotarak Nov 8 '10 at 7:39
    
@kotarak - OK, I didn't know that. I'll update my answer! –  harto Nov 9 '10 at 0:07
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Besides to good answer of Michel: Using high order function on lazy sequences often allow consise solutions compared to explicit recursion:

(defn power [base exp]
  (reduce * (repeat exp base)))
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This version does not allow a negative exp. –  Michiel Borkent Nov 8 '10 at 0:02
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Here is a solution which is an example of Michiel's last statement about using an accumulator. This lets you use recur to gain advantage of tail call optimization. This gives you the advantage of not consuming stack space with each recursion.

(defn pow [base exp]
 (letfn [(power [base exp accum]
                (cond
                  (= exp 0) accum
                  (> exp 0) (recur base (dec exp) (* accum base))
                  :else (recur base (inc exp) (/ accum base))))]
 (power base exp 1)))

user> (pow -3 2)
9
user> (pow -3 3)
-27

If you are simply looking to write a function which does raises a base number to a power don't forget you can call out to methods which already exist in Java. java.util.Math can help you out here.

(Math/pow -2 3)
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