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I'm trying to learn ExtJS and object-oriented JavaScript in general. I've seen people defining classes in custom namespaces in a couple of ways. What's the difference between these two methods?

Method 1

Ext.ns('myapp.cars');
(function(){
    var Car = Ext.extend(Object, {
       //...
    })

    myapp.cars.Car = Car;
})()

Method 2

Ext.ns('myapp.cars');
myapp.cars.Car = Ext.extend(Object, {
       //...
});

Method 2 is easier to read and requires less code; is there any reason Method 1 is better? Thanks!

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1  
Do you mean that Method 2 is easier to read and requires less code? –  fijiaaron Apr 24 '12 at 17:46
    
@fijiaaron Yep! Corrected. –  Clint Harris Apr 24 '12 at 21:52
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's basically the same, except that you could use private variables in the self-exectuing function of the first method, while you can only define global variables in the second one.

For example:

Ext.ns('myapp.cars');
(function(){

    var carInfo = {
      goodEngine: true
    };

    var Car = Ext.extend(Object, {
       info: carInfo
    });

    myapp.cars.Car = Car;
})()

// carInfo is undefined here, so this will give an error
alert( carInfo.goodEngine );

So, the first method is quite useful if you work with a bunge of variables that you won't use later on.

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This is my favorite implementation of the pattern, although I'm having trouble with one thing... @Harmen I have one question, if I'm extending an Ext class, for example var MyWindowClass = Ext.extend(Ext.Window, { ... }); Do you know how I can use default configs declared in MyWindowClass and then, if I extend further (i.e. var MySuperWindowClass = Ext.extend(myapp.MyWindowClass , { ... });) declare default configs again that will be applied along with the default configs in MyWindowClass ? –  b.long May 24 '12 at 21:47
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The following are practically equivalent:

var Car = Ext.extend(Object, {
   //...
});

myapp.cars.Car = Car;

... and:

myapp.cars.Car = Ext.extend(Object, {
   //...
});

In the first example you'd be using a temporary variable to hold a reference to the newly created object, which is then copied to myapp.cars.Car (the reference is copied, not the object). In the second example you'd be assigning the reference to the object directly to myapp.cars.Car.

The reason your first example was enclosed in the self-invoking anonymous function (function(){ })() is to limit the scope of that temporary variable. That is generally done in order not to pollute the global namespace with that Car variable. If there was an other Car variable defined elsewhere, it would not conflict with this one. Example:

var Car = "My Nice Car";

(function(){
    var Car = Ext.extend(Object, {
       //...
    });

    myapp.cars.Car = Car;
})();

alert(Car); // Still "My Nice Car"
            // No conflict with the `Car` variable in the self invoking function.
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You have additional method to define class . Ext.define You can read about it in following link http://myextjs.blogspot.com/2011/11/extjs-object-oriented-design.html

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1  
The original question pertains to ExtJS 3 (not ExtJS 4, in which you can use the new define() function). I have edited the title and tags to clarify now that ExtJS 4 exists. –  Clint Harris Nov 14 '11 at 1:38
    
@ClintHarris - Thanks for pointing this out. If anyone missed that, ExtJS 3 does not include the Ext.define method. –  b.long Feb 6 '13 at 15:24
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