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I have been trying to find ways to make the following piece of code perform faster:

def do_chart(target="IMG_BACK", xlabel="xlabel", ylabel="ylabel", title="title",       ydata=pylab.arange(1961, 2031, 1)):
    global MYRAMDICT
    MYRAMDICT = {}
    print "here"
    for i in range(70):
        MYRAMDICT[i] = cStringIO.StringIO()
        xdata = pylab.arange(1961, 2031, 1)
        pylab.figure(num=None, figsize=(10.24, 5.12), dpi=1, facecolor='w', edgecolor='k')
        pylab.plot(xdata, ydata, linewidth=3.0)
        pylab.xlabel(xlabel); pylab.ylabel(ylabel); pylab.title(i)
        pylab.grid(True)
        pylab.savefig(MYRAMDICT[i], format='png')
        pylab.close()

This function (please ignore the pylab commands, they are here just for illustration) creates a dictionary (MYTAMDICT) which i populated with cString objects that are used to store charts on memmory. These charts are later dynamically presented to the user.

Would somebody please help me to make use of threading so that I can use all of my cores and make this function perform faster? Or point me towards ideas to improve it?

Thank you very much.

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What is the current performance and how much faster does it need to go? –  Steven Rumbalski Nov 7 '10 at 20:19
    
#Steven: If I insert a "print i" just at the beginning of the for loop, I can see that it takes close to one second per image. But this time will increase when I have the real pylab code I ought to use. This function will run every time the user changes a new database, so it will change quite often. I am aware that I could plot just the first image while the other are done in the background, but I though threading sounded like the best solution here. –  relima Nov 7 '10 at 20:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For the description, you'd be far better off using multiprocessing than threading... You have an "embarrassingly parallel" problem, and no disk IO constraints (you're writing to memory) Of course, passing large stuff back and forth between the processes will get expensive, but returning a string representing a .png shouldn't be too bad..

It can be done quite simply:

import multiprocessing
import cStringIO

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

import itertools

def main():
    """Generates 1000 random plots and saves them as .png's in RAM"""
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool()
    same_title = itertools.repeat('Plot %i')
    fig_files = pool.map(plot, itertools.izip(xrange(1000), same_title))

def plot(args):
    """Make a random plot"""
    # Unfortunately, pool.map (and imap) only support a single argument to
    # the function, so you'll have to unpack a tuple of arguments...
    i, titlestring = args

    outfile = cStringIO.StringIO()

    x = np.cumsum(np.random.random(100) - 0.5)

    fig = plt.figure()
    plt.plot(x)
    fig.savefig(outfile, format='png', bbox_inches='tight')
    plt.title(titlestring % i)
    plt.close()

    # cStringIO files aren't pickelable, so we'll return the string instead...
    outfile.seek(0)
    return outfile.read()

main()

Without using multiprocessing, this takes ~250 secs on my machine. With multiprocessing (8 cores), it takes ~40 secs.

Hope that helps a bit...

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This is very cool. Thank you for your help. But I have a question for you. I installed a backport of multiprocessing for python 2.4, but when I use you code I get: ******************************************************* ** Loading -c *********************************************************************** Traceback (most recent call last): File "<string>", line 11, in ? IOError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: '-c' ** Load Time: 0.00 seconds ** WARNING: There were errors in your script, press any key to exit Ideas? Thank you very very much for all your help. –  relima Nov 8 '10 at 0:15
    
@relima - Huh... I'm guessing it's some problem with multiprocessing on 2.4... Things seem to work fine on 2.6 and 2.7, at any rate... I'm afraid I don't have a better idea than that, though... –  Joe Kington Nov 8 '10 at 15:27

Threading will help you if and only if pylab is releasing the gil while executing.
Moreover, pylib must be thread-safe, and your code must use it in a thread-safe way, and this may not be always the case.

That said, if you are going to use threads, I think this is a classical case of job queue; therefore, I would use a queue object, that is nice enough to take care of this pattern.

Here is an example I have put out just by meddling with your code and the example given in the queue documentation. I did not even checked it thoroughly, so it WILL have bugs; it is more to give an idea than anything else.

# "Business" code
def do_chart(target="IMG_BACK", xlabel="xlabel", ylabel="ylabel", title="title",       ydata=pylab.arange(1961, 2031, 1)):
    global MYRAMDICT
    MYRAMDICT = {}
    print "here"
    for i in range(70):
      q.put(i)
    q.join()       # block until all tasks are done

def do_work(i):
    MYRAMDICT[i] = cStringIO.StringIO()
    xdata = pylab.arange(1961, 2031, 1)
    pylab.figure(num=None, figsize=(10.24, 5.12), dpi=1, facecolor='w', edgecolor='k')
    pylab.plot(xdata, ydata, linewidth=3.0)
    pylab.xlabel(xlabel); pylab.ylabel(ylabel); pylab.title(i)
    pylab.grid(True)
    pylab.savefig(MYRAMDICT[i], format='png')
    pylab.close()


# Handling the queue
def worker():
    while True:
        i = q.get()
        do_work(i)
        q.task_done()

q = Queue()
for i in range(num_worker_threads):
     t = Thread(target=worker)
     t.daemon = True
     t.start()
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