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The Challenge

The shortest program by character count that outputs the n-bit Gray Code. n will be an arbitrary number smaller than 1000100000 (due to user suggestions) that is taken from standard input. The gray code will be printed in standard output, like in the example.

Note: I don't expect the program to print the gray code in a reasonable time (n=100000 is overkill); I do expect it to start printing though.

Example

Input:

4

Expected Output:

0000
0001
0011
0010
0110
0111
0101
0100
1100
1101
1111
1110
1010
1011
1001
1000
share

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3  
community wiki? –  perimosocordiae Nov 7 '10 at 20:52
12  
Given that CW is not available on questions without the intervention of the mods it is time for [code-golf] to leave Stack Overflow. The Stack Exchange proposal Code Golf & Programming Puzzles would be a good place, but it requires more commitments before it can go beta... –  dmckee Nov 7 '10 at 21:02
2  
If another forum goes live, hopefully existing CG questions can get migrated. –  Mr. Boy Nov 7 '10 at 23:19
3  
n=100000 seems a bit excessive, no? For 4 bit gray code there are 16 entries each 4 chars long. This works out to 64 bytes. Extrapolating up for the original 1000 bit gray code would require 1.02e298 megabytes. I think this would break everyone's solution, just the recursive ones. –  Samsdram Nov 8 '10 at 0:33
3  
@Gabi: what is the point of having n greater than say 32 or 64 ? It seems like an arbitrary and unnecessary requirement ? –  Paul R Nov 8 '10 at 9:50

17 Answers 17

Python - 53 chars

n=1<<input()
for x in range(n):print bin(n+x^x/2)[3:]

This 54 char version overcomes the limitation of range in Python2 so n=100000 works!

x,n=0,1<<input()
while n>x:print bin(n+x^x/2)[3:];x+=1

69 chars

G=lambda n:n and[x+y for x in'01'for y in G(n-1)[::1-2*int(x)]]or['']

75 chars

G=lambda n:n and['0'+x for x in G(n-1)]+['1'+x for x in G(n-1)[::-1]]or['']
share
3  
You don't use standard input/output –  Gabi Purcaru Nov 7 '10 at 21:14
1  
@Gabi, brand new iterative solution, uses stdin/stdout –  John La Rooy Nov 8 '10 at 1:50
1  
Wow, nice solution! –  ChristopheD Nov 8 '10 at 6:44

APL (29 chars)

With the function F as ( is the 'rotate' char)

z←x F y
z←(0,¨y),1,¨⌽y

This produces the Gray Code with 5 digits ( is now the 'rho' char)

F/5⍴⊂0,1

The number '5' can be changed or be a variable.

(Sorry about the non-printable APL chars. SO won't let me post images as a new user)

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To use input from keyboard; replace '5' by ( 'Execute' 'QuoteQuad' ). This adds 3 chars :-/ –  user500183 Nov 8 '10 at 0:30

Impossible! language (54 58 chars)

#l{'0,'1}1[;@l<][%;~['1%+].>.%['0%+].>.+//%1+]<>%[^].>

Test run:

./impossible gray.i! 5
Impossible v0.1.28
00000
00001
00011
00010
00110
00111
00101
00100
01100
01101
01111
01110
01010
01011
01001
01000
11000
11001
11011
11010
11110
11111
11101
11100
10100
10101
10111
10110
10010
10011
10001
10000

(actually I don't know if personal languages are allowed, since Impossible! is still under development, but I wanted to post it anyway..)

share
6  
As long as the language isn't specifically created to solve this problem it's allowed. –  Mark Elliot Nov 7 '10 at 22:13
2  
Of course this language is not created to solve this problem :) It's a general purpose esoteric language or something like that.. –  Jack Nov 7 '10 at 22:25
    
This actually looks like a nifty esoteric language (and far more useful than some!). Reminds of a terse form of HP RPN code :p But when the APL/J-golfers get in... –  user166390 Nov 7 '10 at 22:38
    
I'm still working on it, but I doubt I can get near to APL or J.. Thanks for the compliment, anyway :) –  Jack Nov 7 '10 at 22:43
1  
why a down vote? just to understand people.. –  Jack Nov 8 '10 at 1:35

Golfscript - 27 chars

Reads from stdin, writes to stdout

~2\?:),{.2/^)+2base''*1>n}%

Sample run

$ echo 4 | ruby golfscript.rb gray.gs 
0000
0001
0011
0010
0110
0111
0101
0100
1100
1101
1111
1110
1010
1011
1001
1000
share

Ruby - 49 chars

(1<<n=gets.to_i).times{|x|puts"%.#{n}b"%(x^x/2)}

This works for n=100000 with no problem

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Nice. Nothing to improve. –  Nakilon Nov 10 '10 at 0:27

C++, 168 characters, not including whitespaces:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int r;

void x(std::string p, char f=48)
{
    if(!r--)std::cout<<p<<'\n';else
    {x(p+f);x(p+char(f^1),49);}
    r++;
}
int main() {
    std::cin>>r;
    x("");
    return 0;
}
share

Haskell, 82 characters:

f a=map('0':)a++map('1':)(reverse a)
main=interact$unlines.(iterate f[""]!!).read

Point-free style for teh win! (or at least 4 fewer strokes). Kudos to FUZxxl.

previous: 86 characters:

f a=map('0':)a++map('1':)(reverse a)
main=interact$ \s->unlines$iterate f[""]!!read s

Cut two strokes with interact, one with unlines.

older: 89 characters:

f a=map('0':)a++map('1':)(reverse a)
main=readLn>>= \s->putStr$concat$iterate f["\n"]!!s

Note that the laziness gets you your immediate output for free.

share
    
Is it possible to use interact here? –  FUZxxl Nov 10 '10 at 7:09
    
It helps a bit... –  comingstorm Nov 10 '10 at 8:11
    
You could also remove unlines and expect input as in cat "123" | myprog, which should be legal. –  FUZxxl Nov 13 '10 at 7:33
    
It already expects input that way. unlines is used to make the output into a string for interact. –  comingstorm Nov 14 '10 at 4:28
1  
Awesome -- I will add that. –  comingstorm Nov 17 '10 at 7:33

Mathematica 50 Chars

Nest[Join["0"<>#&/@#,"1"<>#&/@Reverse@#]&,{""},#]&

Thanks to A. Rex for suggestions!

Previous attempts

Here is my attempt in Mathematica (140 characters). I know that it isn't the shortest, but I think it is the easiest to follow if you are familiar with functional programming (though that could be my language bias showing). The addbit function takes an n-bit gray code and returns an n+1 bit gray code using the logic from the wikipedia page.. The make gray code function applies the addbit function in a nested manner to a 1 bit gray code, {{0}, {1}}, until an n-bit version is created. The charactercode function prints just the numbers without the braces and commas that are in the output of the addbit function.

addbit[set_] := 
 Join[Map[Prepend[#, 0] &, set], Map[Prepend[#, 1] &, Reverse[set]]]
MakeGray[n_] := 
 Map[FromCharacterCode, Nest[addbit, {{0}, {1}}, n - 1] + 48]
share
    
I fear this looks exactly like line noise, but here's 85 characters: p=Prepend;f=FromCharacterCode/@(Nest[Join[#~p~0&/@#,#~p~1&/@Reverse[#]]&,{{}},#‌​]+48)& –  A. Rex Nov 8 '10 at 1:50
    
Edited to post 91 chars solution, but @A. Rex posted a shorter one in the previous comment. Rolling back to leave only the better one. –  belisarius Nov 8 '10 at 2:51
    
@belisarius: Using some of your ideas, it's possible to get even shorter. j=Join;f=FromCharacterCode/@Nest[j[{48}~j~#&/@#,{49}~j~#&/@Reverse[#]]&,{{}},#]‌​& –  A. Rex Nov 8 '10 at 6:54
1  
A lot shorter: f=Nest[Join["0"<>#&/@#,"1"<>#&/@Reverse@#]&,{""},#]& –  A. Rex Nov 8 '10 at 7:12
    
@A. Rex Or for 50 char remove the "f=" and invoke with %[n] –  belisarius Nov 8 '10 at 10:04

Straightforward Python implementation of what's described in Constructing an n-bit Gray code on Wikipedia:

import sys

def _gray(n):
  if n == 1:
    return [0, 1]
  else:
    p = _gray(n-1)
    pr = [x + (1<<(n-1)) for x in p[::-1]]
    return p + pr

n = int(sys.argv[1])
for i in [("0"*n + bin(a)[2:])[-n:] for a in _gray(n)]:
  print i

(233 characters)

Test:

$ python gray.py 4
0000
0001
0011
0010
0110
0111
0101
0100
1100
1101
1111
1110
1010
1011
1001
1000
share
4  
How is this a working example? Or a golfed solution? –  Rafe Kettler Nov 7 '10 at 21:06

C, 203 Characters

Here's a sacrificial offering, in C:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void)
{
    char s[256];
    int b, i, j, m, g;

    gets(s);
    b = atoi(s);

    for (i = 0; i < 1 << b; ++i)
    {
        g = i ^ (i / 2);
        m = 1 << (b - 1);

        for (j = 0; j < b; ++j)
        {
            s[j] = (g & m) ? '1' : '0';
            m >>= 1;
        }
        s[j] = '\0';
        puts(s);
    }
    return 0;
}
share
1  
The input/output are stdin and stdout –  Gabi Purcaru Nov 7 '10 at 21:07
1  
Your code takes input from the command-line, not stdin. –  Brian Nov 7 '10 at 21:38
    
@Brian: oh yes, thanks for the clarification - I'll fix it. –  Paul R Nov 7 '10 at 21:48
    
Now fixed - uses stdin for input –  Paul R Nov 7 '10 at 21:59

C#, 149143 characters


C# isn't the best language for code golf, but I thought I'd go at it anyway.

static void Main(){var s=1L<<int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());for(long i=0;i<s;i++){Console.WriteLine(Convert.ToString(s+i^i/2,2).Substring(1));}}

Readable version:

static void Main()
{
    var s = 1L << int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
    for (long i = 0; i < s; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(Convert.ToString(s + i ^ i / 2, 2).Substring(1));
    }
}
share
    
this won't work for n > 64, unfortunately there's no variable type in C# that can hold 1<<n with n > 64. –  BrokenGlass Nov 8 '10 at 23:17
    
@BrokenGlass Did you try it? There's a reason I'm casting the 1 as long, it works fine with 100000 for me. –  Andrew Koester Nov 9 '10 at 14:30
    
as far as I remember when I tried it (and that made sense) the value of the long rolls over and becomes negative at a certain value - it will work, just not the way it is supposed to. –  BrokenGlass Nov 9 '10 at 21:27
    
@BrokenGlass Darn, you're right! I'll keep looking into this. –  Andrew Koester Nov 9 '10 at 21:57
1  
your code shortened to 135 characters: static void Main(){long i=0,s=1<<int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());while(i<s)Console.WriteLine(Convert.ToStr‌​ing(s+i^i++/2,2).Remove(0,1));} –  Handcraftsman Nov 19 '10 at 21:55

And here is my Fantom sacrificial offering

public static Str[]grayCode(Int i){if(i==1)return["0","1"];else{p:=grayCode(i-1);p.addAll(p.dup.reverse);p.each|s,c|{if(c<(p.size/2))p[c]="0"+s;else p[c]="1"+s;};return p}}

(177 char)

Or the expanded version:

 public static Str[] grayCode(Int i)  
 {      
   if (i==1) return ["0","1"]
   else{
     p := grayCode(i-1);
     p.addAll(p.dup.reverse);
     p.each |s,c| 
     { 
       if(c<(p.size/2))   
       {
         p[c] = "0" + s
       }
       else
       {
         p[c] = "1" + s
       }  
     }
    return p
    }
  }
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F#, 152 characters

let m=List.map;;let rec g l=function|1->l|x->g((m((+)"0")l)@(l|>List.rev|>m((+)"1")))(x - 1);;stdin.ReadLine()|>int|>g["0";"1"]|>List.iter(printfn "%s")
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I couldn't resist golfing this a bit further (143 chars): let m=List.map;;let rec g l=function|1->l|x->g(m((+)"0")l@m((+)"1")(List.rev l))(x-1);;stdin.ReadLine()|>int|>g["0";"1"]|>Seq.iter(printfn"%s") –  cfern Dec 15 '10 at 9:08

F# 180 175 too many characters

This morning I did another version, simplifying the recursive version, but alas due to recursion it wouldn't do the 100000.

Recursive solution:

let rec g m n l =
    if(m = n) then l
    else List.map ((+)"0") l  @ List.map ((+)"1") (List.rev(l)) |> g (m+1) n
List.iter (fun x -> printfn "%s" x) (g 1 (int(stdin.ReadLine())) ["0";"1"]);;

After that was done I created a working version for the "100000" requirement - it's too long to compete with the other solutions shown here and I probably re-invented the wheel several times over, but unlike many of the solutions I have seen here it will work with a very,very large number of bits and hey it was a good learning experience for an F# noob - I didn't bother to shorten it, since it's way too long anyway ;-)

Iterative solution: (working with 100000+)

let bits = stdin.ReadLine() |>int
let n = 1I <<< bits

let bitcount (n : bigint) =
    let mutable m = n
    let mutable c = 1
    while m > 1I do
        m <- m >>>1
        c<-c+1
    c

let rec traverseBits m (number: bigint) =
    let highbit = bigint(1 <<< m)
    if m > bitcount number
    then number
    else
        let lowbit = 1 <<< m-1
        if (highbit&&& number) > 0I
        then
            let newnum = number ^^^ bigint(lowbit)
            traverseBits (m+1) newnum
        else traverseBits (m+1) number

let res =  seq 
            { 
              for i in 0I..n do
                yield traverseBits 1 i
            }

let binary n m = seq 
                  {
                    for i = m-1 downto 0 do
                        let bit = bigint(1 <<< i)
                        if bit &&&n > 0I
                        then yield "1"
                        else yield "0"
                  }

Seq.iter (fun x -> printfn "%s"  (Seq.reduce (+) (binary x bits))) res
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Lua, 156 chars

This is my throw at it in Lua, as close as I can get it.

LuaJIT (or lua with lua-bitop): 156 bytes

a=io.read()n,w,b=2^a,io.write,bit;for x=0,n-1 do t=b.bxor(n+x,b.rshift(x,1))for k=a-1,0,-1 do w(t%2^k==t%n and 0 or 1)t=t%2^k==t and t or t%2^k end w'\n'end

Lua 5.2: 154 bytes

a=io.read()n,w,b=2^a,io.write,bit32;for x=0,n-1 do t=b.XOR(n+x,b.SHR(x,1))for k=a-1,0,-1  do w(t%2^k==t%n and 0 or 1)t=t%2^k==t and t or t%2^k end w'\n'end
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In cut-free Prolog (138 bytes if you remove the space after '<<'; submission editor truncates the last line without it):

b(N,D):-D=0->nl;Q is D-1,H is N>>Q/\1,write(H),b(N,Q).

c(N,D):-N=0;P is N xor(N//2),b(P,D),M is N-1,c(M,D).

:-read(N),X is 1<< N-1,c(X,N).
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Ruby, 50 Chars

(2**n=gets.to_i).times{|i|puts"%0#{n}d"%i.to_s(2)}
share
    
-1: Not gray code, just standard binary counting –  Nemo157 Jan 19 '11 at 2:12

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