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Recently the State Department has released a document saying that AES and DES are unsafe for classified material. This statement from the State Department may be alluding to an attack against these algorithms that is not publicly known.

Under no circumstances should DES- or AES-equipped radios be used for the transmission of classified information, as defined by Executive Order 12958.

AES and 3DES are still on the list of approved algorithms by NIST. However, so is SHA-1, in the case of SHA-1 this is probably because even though it is very broken no one has generated a collision.

So what should a security conscious developer use instead of AES? Why should someone use this algorithm? Are there regulations that govern this alternative (HIPAA,PCI-DSS...)?

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I think one thing to point out is that these documents made it clear that they were applying that only to voice transmission. –  vcsjones Nov 7 '10 at 21:52
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Oh, c'mon, don't be a silly alarmist. See Eugene's answer. –  GregS Nov 8 '10 at 0:02
    
@GregS I gave Eugene a +1. –  rook Nov 8 '10 at 1:29
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AES has never been approved for transmission of classified material - the NSA has developed suites of algorithms, that are themselves classified, for this purpose. –  caf Nov 8 '10 at 13:48
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@caf: "AES with 256-bit keys, [...other algorithms...] are required to protect classified information at the TOP SECRET level." nsa.gov/ia/programs/suiteb_cryptography -- Suite A (I assume that's what you're referring to) is above this yet classified data is still considered secure with Suite B isn't it? –  LaceCard Apr 26 '11 at 22:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I think you've misunderstood what the document is talking about. It doesn't say the algorithms are weak. It says that the equipment is not strong enough to protect top secret information. This doesn't mean, though, that AES is not secure anymore. Actually, some weaknesses of AES were known from the very beginning although they were not disclosed widely. It's just a question of time and efforts needed to attack the information. Often rubber-hose cryptanalysis proves to be much more effective, than cracking the algorithm. And this is exactly why the same document says

"All DES/AES radio equipment in storage or maintenance channels must be zeroized of all key codes. If not equipped with a zeroize feature, a randomly produced key code must be loaded in order to overwrite the mission's actual operational code."

. I.e. the point is to protect the keys from being extracted from portable hardware, not to claim weakness in AES.

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Recently the State Department has released a document saying that AES and DES are unsafe for classified material. This statement from the State Department maybe eluding to an attack against these algorithms that is not publicly known.

The reference to AES in the article you linked to was much much more specific than you describe here. It refers to a specific implementation (specific two-way radios), and further, there is no indication that the tool in question was ever approved for transmission of material classified at the Secret level or above.

The upshot is that:

  • This may simply be a reminder or clarification of an existing policy.
  • This may refer to a implementation-specific vulnerability (e.g. the passwords were found to be written on the outside of the radios)

Finally, the word you are looking for is allude. Elude means 'to escape'

AES and 3DES are still on the list of approved algorithms by NIST. However, so is SHA-1, in the case of SHA-1 this is probably because even though it is very broken no one has generated a collision.

And the reason for that is that even a 'very broken' hash function as defined by a security researcher can be fully secure enough against practical attacks to make it worth continued use.

So what should a security conscious developer use instead of AES? Why should someone use this algorithm? Are there regulations that govern this alternative (HIPAA,PCI-DSS...)?

The sky is not yet fallen. If you're concerned, I would suggest adding bits to your key.

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The 3rd place in the AES competition was Twofish, and is the successor to blowfish. Dispite ongoing research twofish is still very secure. On the horizon is threefish which is based on Skein. However, Skein and by extension threefish have gone though multiple rounds of changes due to the Sha-3 Competition. Threefish and Skein should not be used until SHA-3 Competition has completed.

Serpent was 2nd place in the AES Competition. This cipher is considered to be more conservative than the winner Rijndael. Serpent lost points in the competition because it isn't as efficient as twofish or Rijndael. There are also known attacks against Serpent, however I'm not sure how it compares to the AES winner Rijndael.

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I'm pretty sure you meant "Skein", so I changed it. Revert if I was wrong. –  Pascal Cuoq Nov 7 '10 at 21:46
    
@Pascal Cuoq thank you –  rook Nov 7 '10 at 21:48

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