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I have an application that uses SQLite, which is extremely light weight and quick. I have some preferences that don't necessarily need to be loaded on startup, but might need to be used at various times depending on where the user goes. That being said, I can't decide where to store this information.

Q1: Should I just go ahead and store it in the database? Should I store it in a config file?

Q2: Should I load and store the preferences and other data at startup even if they're not necessarily being used right away? Or should I just query the database when I need them?

Example: My application can store the company information for the company that is using the software. Company name, company phone, etc. The only time this information is used is when the software auto-prints a letter, or the user goes to edit their company information in the program.

EDIT: I've realized that this comes down to application settings vs user settings. My program does not have multiple users per copy of the software. That being said, I would suppose these would be application settings.

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loading when needed the first time versus loading on application start is a personal preference. Loading when first needed allows for a faster start time. Singleton lookups like that (where you load it into a singleton on first access) are negligible impact, but may have a definite UI effect. Consider how Photoshop loads up (where it loads EVERYTHING before giving you the UI) versus the pause you get in some applications when you load things and get that annoying wait-please screen. –  jcolebrand Nov 7 '10 at 23:25
    
@drachenstem And you can also load things up in the background and let the user wait for it to load if it isn't loaded. Much like Visual Studio. Sometimes the documentation cache is not built, but will be if need it –  Oskar Kjellin Nov 8 '10 at 0:40
    
Very true, but for the most part, the data I'll be loading is very small in size, the user shouldn't even notice. –  OogaBooga Nov 8 '10 at 0:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How many settings are you looking to save? Using the built-in settings feature is pretty painless.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa730869.aspx

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Not too many at all actually. Never heard of this... I'll give it a read. –  OogaBooga Nov 7 '10 at 22:54
    
I would not recommend this for "User" settings, only "Application" settings. If you use "User" settings, the values get stored in the APPDATA folder in a bizarre foldername that changes for each version of the application making it so that if the user upgrades, all their previous settings disappear. –  Chris Thompson Nov 7 '10 at 23:07
    
I've realized that this comes down to application settings vs user settings. My program does not have multiple users per copy of the software. That being said, I would suppose these would be application settings. In that case, I would suppose JTA's answer would be the best for my problem. If anyone has any reason why this wouldn't be so, please let me know! –  OogaBooga Nov 7 '10 at 23:17
    
@Chris Thompson We've gotten around this by putting a "Shared" folder in the AppData that retains the users settings (it was a hack using Log4Net to create the directory during Application first run); that way even if they upgrade, their settings stay around. We're presently moving this to a database for other reasons (load balanced RemoteApp). –  George Stocker Nov 7 '10 at 23:23
    
One other comment. The application itself cannot modify the settings stored as application settings using the built-in settings class. So make sure that any settings you store there you're prepared to have your used manipulate the XML file directly. –  Chris Thompson Nov 8 '10 at 0:15

What you may want to do is write a class that encapsulates the settings and then reads them into Hashtable.

You could have a basic GetSetting method that looks up a setting based on a name. If the setting is located in the Hashtable, return the value, otherwise go to the DB to find the setting and then store it in the Hashtable. You can then write separate properties for each setting you want, each calling the GetSetting/SetSetting methods.

This allows you to store the settings in the DB easily, and caches the reads to avoid constantly reading the DB.

public class Settings {
    private object SyncRoot = new object();
    private System.Collections.Hashtable _cache = new System.Collections.Hashtable();

    public T GetSetting<T>(string xPath, T defaultValue)
    {
        lock (SyncRoot)
        {
            if (!_cache.ContainsKey(xPath))
            {
                T val = GetSettingFromDB<T>(xPath, defaultValue);
                _cache[xPath] = val;
                return val;
            }
            return (T)_cache[xPath];
        }
    }

    public T GetSettingFromDB<T>(string xPath, T defaultValue)
    {
         // Read from DB
    }

    public void SaveSetting<T>(string xPath, T value)
    {
        lock (SyncRoot)
        {
            if (_cache.ContainsKey(xPath))
                _cache[xPath] = value;
        }

        SaveSettingToDB<T>(xPath, value);
    }

    public T SaveSettingToDB<T>(string xPath, T defaultValue)
    {
         // Read from DB
    }
}

Then just create a class with a bunch of properties like this:

    public static bool BooleanFeature
    {
        get { return Settings.GetSetting<bool>("BooleanFeature", true); }
        set { Settings.SaveSetting<bool>("BooleanFeature", value); }
    }

Now you can do this in your code:

if (Setting.BooleanFeature) {
    // Run certain code
else {
    // Run other code
}
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I appreciate your in depth explanation and code examples, but as my comment states below JTA's post, I think I would be best suited to use his solution given my settings would be application settings. –  OogaBooga Nov 7 '10 at 23:18

Storing configuration data in a file is good for light-weight settings that rarely change. Usually you'd do this for settings that are different between development and production and are used to get your application up and running.

After that, everything else is best stored in a database. This gives you the option for good user interfaces to modify the settings, load them when needed, save them during upgrades to your system, be available if you're using multiple front-ends (versus saving the configuration in a file and ensuring all front-ends have the same up-to-date files.)

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In addition to JTAs answer I would like to add that I've used 3 methods and they all have their up and down sides.

  1. Storing them in the built-in one does actually lock them to the running user. So for instance if multiple users use your app, there will be independent settings for each user. If this is what you want, pick this one.
  2. Storing them in the database is useful if you do not want it to be bound to a user but rather to the database. Though you cannot change these settings from outside the app.

  3. I've used a config-class that I serialize with XML if I need to edit it with an xml-editor. For instance this is very useful if you are running a service.

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