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How can I dry this ?

def correct_user
  @company = RealEstateCompany.find(params[:id])     
  if(current_user != @company.user)
    redirect_to(root_path)
  end
end  

def correct_user
 @company = ConstructionCompany.find(params[:id])     
 if(current_user != @company.user)
   redirect_to(root_path)
 end
end

The answer is below and it's as followed in a module:

def correct_user_for_controller?(controller_name)
  @company = controller_name.classify.constantize.find(params[:id])     
  redirect_to(root_path) unless (current_user == @company.user)
end     

Then inside any controller include the model and use

correct_user_for_controller?("ConstructionCompany") 

correct_user_for_controller?("RealEstateCompany")
share|improve this question
    
Is there a reason RealEstateCompany and ConstructionCompany are separate models? This would be DRYer if you just had one Company model. –  Jordan Nov 8 '10 at 0:23
    
Yes RealEstateCompany is different from ConstructionCompany in several ways, for instance ConstructionCompany has_many: projects while RealEstateCompany does not. –  daniel Nov 8 '10 at 0:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming you have want this facility inside ConstructionCompaniesController and RealEstateCompaniesController:

def correct_user
  @company = controller_name.classify.constantize.find(params[:id])     
  redirect_to(root_path) unless (current_user == @company.user)
end 
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this is although not very well explained but gave enough to come up with the answer ! –  daniel Nov 8 '10 at 2:07
module OwnershipPermission
    def accessible_for_user?(user)
        self.user == user
    end
end

Simply include this module in both models and perform the model level check. You could also create a module for the controller, but I highly advise against that (hurts maintainability).

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is not were to put the current_user != @company.user, the problem is finding the current user, I have to find it through @company = ConstructionCompany.find(params[:id]) –  daniel Nov 8 '10 at 1:48
    
What's wrong with @company = ConstructionCompany.find(params[:id])? –  glebm Nov 8 '10 at 1:49
    
Yep I think I just can't dry this code, there 4 models were I have the same method correct_user, where I find the instance requested using the controller and then check the owner –  daniel Nov 8 '10 at 2:01

It looks like you are trying to do an authorization check (</clippy>).

Have you checked out any of the existing comprehensive authorization solutions? It might make sense to leverage the effort of others in solving this common problem.

This thread on authorization for rails gives some examples. In particular, with CanCan you could include something like this in the method you are trying to protect:

authorize! :read, @company

Which says "does the current user have permission to see the details of @company".

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