Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to convert PDF to SVG please suggest some libraries/executable that will be able to do this efficiently. I have written my own java program using the apache PDFBox and Batik libraries -

PDDocument document = PDDocument.load( pdfFile );
DOMImplementation domImpl =
    GenericDOMImplementation.getDOMImplementation();

// Create an instance of org.w3c.dom.Document.
String svgNS = "http://www.w3.org/2000/svg";
Document svgDocument = domImpl.createDocument(svgNS, "svg", null);
SVGGeneratorContext ctx = SVGGeneratorContext.createDefault(svgDocument);
ctx.setEmbeddedFontsOn(true);

// Ask the test to render into the SVG Graphics2D implementation.

    for(int i = 0 ; i < document.getNumberOfPages() ; i++){
        String svgFName = svgDir+"page"+i+".svg";
        (new File(svgFName)).createNewFile();
        // Create an instance of the SVG Generator.
        SVGGraphics2D svgGenerator = new SVGGraphics2D(ctx,false);
        Printable page  = document.getPrintable(i);
        page.print(svgGenerator, document.getPageFormat(i), i);
        svgGenerator.stream(svgFName);
    }

This solution works great but the size of the resulting svg files in huge.(many times greater than the pdf). I have figured out where the problem is by looking at the svg in a text editor. it encloses every character in the original document in its own block even if the font properties of the characters is the same. For example the word hello will appear as 6 different text blocks. Is there a way to fix the above code? or please suggest another solution that will work more efficiently.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 37 down vote accepted

Inkscape can also be used to convert PDF to SVG. It's actually remarkably good at this, and although the code that it generates is a bit bloated, at the very least, it doesn't seem to have the particular issue that you are encountering in your program. I think it would be challenging to integrate it directly into Java, but inkscape provides a convenient command-line interface to this functionality, so probably the easiest way to access it would be via a system call.

To use Inkscape's command-line interface to convert a PDF to an SVG, use:

inkscape -l out.svg in.pdf

Which you can then probably call using:

Runtime.getRuntime().exec("inkscape -l out.svg in.pdf")

http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/lang/Runtime.html#exec%28java.lang.String%29

I think exec() is synchronous and only returns after the process completes (although I'm not 100% sure on that), so you shoudl be able to just read "out.svg" after that. In any case, Googling "java system call" will yield more info on how to do that part correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks that inkscape command seems to work however it only converts the first page, do u know of a command line option that will produce 1 svg for each page? –  user434541 Nov 8 '10 at 18:20
1  
I don't know of a way to do this, and the inkscape man page doesn't seem to indicate that this functionality is exposed in the command-line interface. I suppose your options would be to add this interface yourself by modifying the inkscape code. Or, you could do something very hacky and creative, and use a program like ghostscript to split the PDF into multiple single-page documents, and then feed each page individually to inkscape. –  jbeard4 Nov 9 '10 at 2:06
1  
Probably the best solution then is to split the pdf file in one file per page. Both pdfjam and pdftk can do this. –  hlovdal Aug 28 '11 at 22:27
    
@Koen.'s answer points to pdf2svg, which can do multiple pages: pdf2svg input.pdf output_page%d.svg all –  alxndr Feb 10 '13 at 5:53
    
I know this is old, but I've also noticed inkscape bloating (e.g. doubling up on groups) when dealing with .pdfs. Once you've got .svgs, there's a cleanup utility called scour which might help. –  Chris H Aug 15 '13 at 11:54

Take a look at pdf2svg:

To use

pdf2svg <input.pdf> <output.svg> [<pdf page no. or "all" >]

When using all give a filename with %d in it (which will be replaced by the page number).

pdf2svg input.pdf output_page%d.svg all

And for some troubleshooting see: http://www.calcmaster.net/personal_projects/pdf2svg/

share|improve this answer
2  
I had been using pdf2svg but I just discovered that it's much more of an approximation than inkscape. Specifically you loose detail when rendering small circles (I'm dealing with pdfs of 100,000s of paths). YMMV. –  Aidan Kane Nov 27 '12 at 23:18
1  
@AidanKane: On the other hand, pdf2svg does better than Inkscape for text; text from a LaTeX output file didn't show up in Inkscape's output for me. –  Mechanical snail Feb 23 at 21:15
    
@Mechanicalsnail: I have a lot more experience with this now. You're right, there are times where I've found things missing from inkscape conversions - and pdf2svg is fine. pdf2svg was updated to call a different function in cairo to do the rendering (which fixed the issue I described previously). Unfortunately that comes at the cost of having no text in svgs - all glyphs are converted to paths. I patched cairo and poppler to get text working again but I don't totally trust my hack :) –  Aidan Kane Feb 23 at 23:19
    
both inkscape and dvisvgm cannot create correct svg from latex. pdf2svg can. –  ivo Welch Mar 1 at 22:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.