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I know what self::staticFunctionName()
parent::staticFunctionName()
are, and how they are different from each other and from $this->functionName

But what is: static::staticFunctionName() ?

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(related) What does that symbol mean in PHP –  Gordon Nov 8 '10 at 8:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It's the keyword used in PHP 5.3+ to invoke late static bindings.
Read all about it in the manual: http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.late-static-bindings.php


In summary, static::foo() works like a dynamic self::foo().

class A {
    static function foo() {
        // This will be executed.
    }
    static function bar() {
        self::foo();
    }
}

class B extends A {
    static function foo() {
        // This will not be executed.
        // The above self::foo() refers to A::foo().
    }
}

B::bar();

static solves this problem:

class A {
    static function foo() {
        // This is overridden in the child class.
    }
    static function bar() {
        static::foo();
    }
}

class B extends A {
    static function foo() {
        // This will be executed.
        // static::foo() is bound late.
    }
}

B::bar();

static as a keyword for this behavior is kind of confusing, since it's all but. :)

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1  
You use static::functionName() if you're in the parent class, but you want to call the child's static function. That way you can let subclasses override static behaviour. –  Michael Clerx Nov 8 '10 at 1:56

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