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I'm learning PHP and found some surprising behaviour when I was trying to figure out why a constructor wasn't getting called.

<?php
    class Shape {

        function __construct() { 
            echo 'Shape.';
        }
    }

    class Triangle extends Shape {

        function __construct() {        
            echo 'Triangle';
        }
    }

    $tri = new Triangle();
?>

I'm used to java, so I thought this would output "Shape. Triangle." Surprisingly, it just outputs "Triangle." I searched for the problem and apparently I can kinda sorta fix it by putting parent::__construct(); in the child class, but that doesn't seem ideal. Is there anything I can do to the Shape class to ensure that child classes always call the parent constructor? Do I really have to write parent::__construct(); in the class of every child whenever the parent has a constructor?

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1  
I'm pretty sure you have to, unless you don't define the child constructor. –  Jakub Hampl Nov 8 '10 at 3:47
    
possible duplicate of Is Superclass's constructor run inside child constructor in PHP? –  outis Feb 24 '12 at 9:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you define a method of the same name in a child class, the parent's method is overridden and will not be called under any circumstances, unless you do so explicitly. I.e.: No, there's nothing you can do about it, you have to call parent::__constructor() explictly.

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+1 nothing else to add. –  Hamish Nov 8 '10 at 3:59
1  
You could also have the parent declare an abstract or empty initialize method that the parent constructor calls. –  erisco Nov 8 '10 at 5:21
    
@erisco That would be a good design pattern to work around this, but it doesn't change the facts. :) –  deceze Nov 8 '10 at 5:43
    
@deceze The initial question does ask about emulating a specific behavior... which can, in fact, be emulated. –  MirroredFate Mar 25 at 0:19
    
@Mirrored I wouldn't say that using final and designating another method as the constructor is a great alternative. What if you want to extend the extending class and ensure its alternative constructor is run? It's not a very scalable solution. The default PHP idiom is to use parent. It's every developer's decision and responsibility to do so. –  deceze Mar 25 at 6:46

According to the PHP manual:

Parent constructors are not called implicitly if the child class defines
a constructor. In order to run a parent constructor, a call to
parent::__construct() within the child constructor is required. 
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As of PHP 5, you can use the final keyword to prevent a parent method from being overridden.

<?php
class BaseClass {
   public function test() {
       echo "BaseClass::test() called\n";
   }

   final public function moreTesting() {
       echo "BaseClass::moreTesting() called\n";
   }
}

class ChildClass extends BaseClass {
   public function moreTesting() {
       echo "ChildClass::moreTesting() called\n";
   }
}
// Results in Fatal error: Cannot override final method BaseClass::moreTesting()

You could use this in combination with a pre-defined init() method to ensure your parent constructor was called.

<?php
abstract class Shape {

    final function __construct() { 
        $this->init();
        echo 'Shape.';
    }

    abstract public function init();
}

class Triangle extends Shape {

    function init() {        
        echo 'Triangle';
    }
}

$tri = new Triangle();

This would output

TriangleShape.

It is advisable to only use a design like this if you document what the init() method does, and where it is called in the parent.

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