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Possible Duplicates:
Why C# doen't support multiple inheritance
Should C# include multiple inheritance?

i like to what is reason for interface support multiple inheritance and class doesnt support

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marked as duplicate by Matthew Flaschen, TomTom, leppie, Gabe, Graviton Nov 8 '10 at 11:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Same as [Why C# doen't support multiple inheritance ](stackoverflow.com/questions/2865302/…). –  Matthew Flaschen Nov 8 '10 at 5:55
    
which is a dup of Should C# include multiple inheritance? –  Marc Gravell Nov 8 '10 at 5:56
    
@Marc, it was closed as such, but I don't really agree. Why it was designed that way and whether it was the right design are different issues. –  Matthew Flaschen Nov 8 '10 at 5:58
    
@Matthew - I thought the same thing about this one, which is why I didn't close it ;p (I didn't close the other one, either) –  Marc Gravell Nov 8 '10 at 6:01
    
I agree with Matthew, this is not a dup, as the question is about why it was supported for interfaces but not classes. I don't see an answer to that in either question and I think it's interesting. –  Kirk Woll Nov 8 '10 at 6:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'd be very interested in a more authoritative answer, but here's my take.

In languages that support multiple inheritance, the key ambiguity that is (arguably) unsatisfactorily resolved is what happens when you subclass from two types that both define a method with the same signature. For example:

public class BaseClass1 
{
    public string SomeMethod() 
    {
        return "Implementation1";
    }
}

public class BaseClass2 
{
    public string SomeMethod() 
    {
        return "Implementation2";
    }
}

public class MySuclass : BaseClass1, BaseClass2 
{
}

Now what does the following return?

MySubclass mySubclass = new MySubclass();
string s = mySubclass.SomeMethod();

In C#, explicit interface implementation allows you to easily resolve this by definining both. After converting BaseClass1 and BaseClass2 to interfaces, we can have

public class MySuclass : IBaseClass1, IBaseClass2 
{
    string IBaseClass1.SomeMethod()
    {
        return "Implementation1";
    }

    string IBaseClass2.SomeMethod()
    {
        return "Implementation2";
    }
}

The key of course being that there is no ambiguity with this syntax as it's not possible to access SomeMethod without first casting the target to either IBaseClass1 or IBaseClass2.

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I would rather 'negate' your statement.. "interface support multiple inheritance".

Interface is NOT actually inheritance, it is JUST a "contract" of service/behavior that a class abides with.

By implementing an interface a class does NOT inherit anything per se.

And since a class/entity can bind with multiple contracts (behaviours), we can implement multiple interfaces in a class.

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Because these are conceptually two totally different things.

If you inherit from a class, you inherit the code of the base class. If you implement (not inherit!) an interface, you force your implementing class to have some predefined method/event/property signatures.

While multiple inheritance for classes is a notorious source of errors and confusion, having many interfaces in a class' inheritance list is about combining various behavioural aspects, and as such it is an important instrument for component-based programming.

Or, in other words: It is an implementation of the Favour Composition over Inheritance design principle.

Thomas

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