Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using L. Bugnion's MVVM Light Framework.
What are some of the recommended approaches to pass parameters such as Customer's ID to ViewModel's constructor?

Edit: The parameter I need for each ViewModel is not something that is shared across models. it is something unique to each viewmodel instance.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

//Create a container class to pass via messenger service
    public class CarSelectedArgs
    {
      #region Declarations

      public Car Car { get; set; }

      #endregion

      #region Constructor

      public CarSelectedArgs(Car car)
      {
        Car = car;
      }

      #endregion
    }


    //example of view model sending message.
    public class SendingViewModel : ViewModelBase
    {
      private Car _car;
      public Car SelectedCar
      {
        get { return _car; }
        set
        {
          _car = value;
          if (value != null)
          {
            //messenger will notify all classes that have registered for a message of this type
            Messenger.Default.Send(new CarSelectedArgs(value));
          }
        }
      }
    }


    //Example of ViewModel registering to recieve a message
    public class SampleViewModel : ViewModelBase
    {
      #region Constructor

      public SampleViewModel()
      {
        Messenger.Default.Register<CarSelectedArgs>(this, OnCarSelected);
      }
      #endregion

      #region LocalMethods

      void OnCarSelected(CarSelectedArgs e)
      {

        var NewCar = e.Car;
      }

      #endregion
    }
share|improve this answer

Request anything you want, via injection, using interfaces.

If you have settings shared across models, instantiate a singleton containing the values and expose them via ISomethingProvider and ISomethingEditor interfaces.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your response. However, the parameter I need for each ViewModel is not something that is shared across models. it is something unique to each viewmodel instance, such as the customer ID for customer detail ViewModel. –  Yeonho Nov 8 '10 at 23:42

For me the whole point of using MVVM Light is to avoid injecting anything into the constructor of a View Model. MVVM Light provides a Messaging facility that allows you to send your parameters to a listener registered inside of the View Model.

For example, this is my View Model from my WordWalkingStick project using VSTO and WPF:

using System;
using System.Xml.Linq;
using GalaSoft.MvvmLight.Messaging;

namespace Songhay.Wpf.WordWalkingStick.ViewModels
{
    using Songhay.Office2010.Word;
    using Songhay.OpenXml;
    using Songhay.OpenXml.Models;
    using Songhay.Wpf.Mvvm;
    using Songhay.Wpf.Mvvm.ViewModels;

    /// <summary>
    /// View Model for the default Client
    /// </summary>
    public class ClientViewModel : ViewModelBase
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="ClientViewModel"/> class.
        /// </summary>
        public ClientViewModel()
        {
            if(base.IsInDesignMode)
            {
                #region

                this._flatOpcSourceString = ApplicationUtility
                    .LoadResource(
 new Uri("/Songhay.Wpf.WordWalkingStick;component/PackedFiles/FlatOpcToHtml.xml",
                         UriKind.Relative));
                this._xhtmlSourceString = ApplicationUtility
                    .LoadResource(
 new Uri("/Songhay.Wpf.WordWalkingStick;component/PackedFiles/FlatOpcToHtml.html", 
                         UriKind.Relative));

                #endregion
            }
            else
            {
                this._flatOpcSourceString = "Loading…";
                this._xhtmlSourceString = "Loading…";

                //Receive MvvmLight message:
                Messenger.Default.Register(this, 
                     new Action<GenericMessage<TransformationMessage>>(
                message =>
                {
                    var tempDocFolder = 
 Environment.ExpandEnvironmentVariables("%UserProfile%/Desktop/");
                    var inputPath = tempDocFolder + "temp.docx";
                    var outputPath = tempDocFolder + "temp.html";

                    var flatOpcDoc = 
                            XDocument.Parse(message.Content.TransformationResult);
                    OpenXmlUtility.TransformFlatToOpc(flatOpcDoc, inputPath);

                    this.FlatOpcSourceString = flatOpcDoc.Root.ToString();

                    var settings = new SonghayHtmlConverterSettings()
                    {
                        PageTitle = "My Page Title " + DateTime.Now.ToString("U"),
                        UseEntityMap = false
                    };

                    OpenXmlUtility.WriteHtmlFile(inputPath, outputPath, settings);

                    var xhtmlDoc = XDocument.Load(outputPath);
                    this.XhtmlSourceString = xhtmlDoc.Root.ToString();

                }));
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets or sets the flat opc source string.
        /// </summary>
        /// <value>The flat opc source string.</value>
        public string FlatOpcSourceString
        {
            get
            {
                return _flatOpcSourceString;
            }
            set
            {
                _flatOpcSourceString = value;
                base.RaisePropertyChanged("FlatOpcSourceString");
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets or sets the XHTML source string.
        /// </summary>
        /// <value>The XHTML source string.</value>
        public string XhtmlSourceString
        {
            get
            {
                return _xhtmlSourceString;
            }
            set
            {
                _xhtmlSourceString = value;
                base.RaisePropertyChanged("XhtmlSourceString");
            }
        }

        string _flatOpcSourceString;
        string _xhtmlSourceString;
    }
}

You can see that MVVM Light is messaging (not injecting) values into the constructor (Messenger.Default.Register) with its Messenger.

share|improve this answer
    
I need to send the parameter to a certain instance of ViewModel, such as customer ID for customer detail ViewModel. How can you use messenger to send message to a specific ViewModel instance? –  Yeonho Nov 8 '10 at 23:46
    
I'm not sure your exact scenario can be addressed. It looks like messaging can drive internal functionality in the View Model that can be customer ID driven. It seems to me that messaging does not have to be aware of a particular instance but the code the message calls can do. –  rasx Nov 9 '10 at 2:26
    
You should be able to do instance specific messaging using tokens but personally I would recommend injecting the parameters instead. –  jpierson Aug 12 at 4:24

Here is what I do:

ViewModel needs to show a car window with car id passed as parameter:

ViewModel -> message to codebehind for view to open window. Message sends id.

Essentially in code behind:

var vm = new viewmodel(id); var view = new view(); view.datacontext = vm; view.show();

my viewmodel has a constructor that takes in an id.

share|improve this answer
    
I think if you're going the "Light" route, this is the best option. I'd suggest that, in addition to this, you register the class in the ServiceLocator in design mode only in order to provide design time data. –  N Jones Nov 4 '13 at 18:18

In the case of writing tests against the viewmodel I sometimes create an overload of the viewmodel constructor that takes an ISomething as a parameter. I have the default constructor call the second one with a default implementation of ISomething. In case of the test I call the constructor with a test implementation. I know it's not the best method, because it creates a dependency between the two classes... but sometimes you'll have to take the easy path...

public class SomeViewModel
{
  private ISomething internalSomething;

  public void SomeViewModel():this(new Something()){}

  public void SomeViewModel(ISomething something)
  {
    this.internalSomething = something;
  }    
}

Update

Creating a view in xaml can be like this:

<UserControl xmlns="...."
             xmlns:Example="SomeNamespace">

  <UserControl.DataContext>
     <Example:SomeViewModel />
  </UserControl.DataContext>

  <Grid>
     ...
  </Grid>
</UserControl>
share|improve this answer
    
how would you instantiate the ViewModel in the runtime, and pair it with its view? –  Yeonho Nov 9 '10 at 0:19
    
In case of a ModelViewLocator as used in MvvmLight this doesn't require any changes. For very simple projects I sometimes create the viewmodel in xaml. I'll add it to the post... –  Sorskoot Nov 9 '10 at 7:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.