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I have following template code:

class ClassName{};

template <class T>
class TemplatePtr
{
public:
    void operator=(T* p)
    {

    }
};

class TemplatePtr_ClassName: public TemplateePtr<ClassName>
{
public:
    ~TempaltePtr_ClassName();
};


void Test()
{
    TemplatePtr_ClassName data;
    data = new ClassName;
}

but compile fails with error message (VS2008):

error C2679: binary '=' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type >>'ClassName *' (or there is no acceptable conversion)

Why it won't work as I have defined an operator in the template base class?

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4  
I am scared to ask why you want that overload. –  Roger Pate Nov 8 '10 at 8:28
    
@Roger Pate See that destructor? I want to do some clearup work myself, which is not provided in the base template class, and which might be different for different calsses –  Baiyan Huang Nov 8 '10 at 11:17
    
@lz_prgmr: I understand the inheritance (though you should look at traits classes), but not the overload in TemplatePtr. –  Roger Pate Nov 8 '10 at 11:26
    
@Roger Pate In fact, This is extract from a large template class to show the problem clearer. That template class is designed to use like a SmartPtr, but I found I need to do some clearup work, so I inherit it. –  Baiyan Huang Nov 8 '10 at 11:37
    
@Roger Pate traits classes is a good idea, but I may don't have permission to change implementation of TemplatePtr (or don't want to introduce risk by changing a very low-level, widely-used class when approaching release) –  Baiyan Huang Nov 8 '10 at 11:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

operator = is always hidden by the derived class implementation unless explicit using declaration is provided. This is true for both class templates and ordinary classes.

BTW, your declaration of operator= is very nonstandard. It is usually declared so for a class 'A'.

A& operator=(A const &);

Here is something that may be what you are looking for (and compiles)

template <class T> 
class TemplatePtr 
{ 
public: 
    TemplatePtr& operator=(TemplatePtr const &) 
    {return *this;} 
}; 

template<class T>
class TemplatePtr_ClassName: public TemplatePtr<T> 
{ 
public:
   ~TemplatePtr_ClassName(){};
   TemplatePtr_ClassName& operator=(TemplatePtr_ClassName const &that){
      TemplatePtr<T>::operator=(that);        // invoke base class assignment operator
      return *this;
   }
}; 


int main() 
{ 
    TemplatePtr_ClassName<int> data; 
    data = *new TemplatePtr_ClassName<int>; 
    // delete stuff
} 
share|improve this answer
    
The code for the using declaration mentioned in the answer would be: using TemplatePtr<T>::operator=; inside the class curly braces in the TemplatePtr_ClassName class. The shortcoming of the using declaration is that it will also bring TemplatePtr<T>::operator=( TemplatePtr<T> const & ) (implicitly defined assignment operator in the base type) into scope, so not only you will be able to assign a T* to the derived class, but also a TemplatePtr<T> const &. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 8 '10 at 8:52
    
Yes, that's the reason I showed a working code on using the base class assignment operator from derived class (and not using the 'using' directive) –  Chubsdad Nov 8 '10 at 8:54
    
@Chubsdad My intention is to be able to assign from a T* and I want to write my own destructor to do cleanup specifically. So your way may not suitable for this purpose. –  Baiyan Huang Nov 8 '10 at 11:49
    
@lz_prgmr: You can overload operator= for T* as well. TemplatePtr_ClassName& operator=(T const *that); –  Chubsdad Nov 8 '10 at 11:57
    
@Chubsdad yea, this should work. –  Baiyan Huang Nov 8 '10 at 12:00

It gets inherited. However, the compiler-generated assignment operator for TempaltePtr_ClassName hides the inherited operator. You can make it visible by adding

using TempaltePtr<ClassName>::operator=;

to your derived class.

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3  
This has the shortcoming of also bringing TemplatePtr<T>::operator=( Template<T> const & ) into scope, which may not be wanted. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 8 '10 at 8:53
1  
@Iz_prgmr Yes. This is most visible in the case of non-default constructors. E.g., if you had a TempaltePtr::TempaltePtr(T* p) constructor, you would have to add a TempaltePtr_ClassName::TempaltePtr_ClassName(ClassName* p) : TempaltePtr<Classname>(p) {} to your class. –  Sjoerd Nov 8 '10 at 12:06
2  
@lz_prgmr, well, constructors and destructors don't have names and therefore cannot be hidden. The only other special member function is operator=. Operator & is not a special member function -- compiler does not generate one. –  avakar Nov 8 '10 at 12:13
1  
@Sjoerd, that's not due to hiding. You can't use using to unhide "inherited constructors". –  avakar Nov 8 '10 at 12:15
1  
@lz_prgmr, yes, default constructor, copy constructor, destructor and copy-assignment operator are the only special member functions (that's the term they are referred to by the standard). –  avakar Nov 8 '10 at 12:41

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