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Does there exist a routine in Delphi that rounds a TDateTime value to the closest second, closest hour, closest 5-minute, closest half hour etc?

UPDATE:

Gabr provided an answer. There were some small errors, possibly due to the complete lack of testing ;-)

I cleaned it up a bit and tested it, and here's the final(?) version:

function RoundDateTimeToNearestInterval(vTime : TDateTime; vInterval : TDateTime = 5*60/SecsPerDay) : TDateTime;
var
  vTimeSec,vIntSec,vRoundedSec : int64;
begin
  //Rounds to nearest 5-minute by default
  vTimeSec := round(vTime * SecsPerDay);
  vIntSec := round(vInterval * SecsPerDay);

  if vIntSec = 0 then exit(vTimeSec / SecsPerDay);

  vRoundedSec := round(vTimeSec / vIntSec) * vIntSec;

  Result := vRoundedSec / SecsPerDay;
end;
share|improve this question
    
what was wrong with my answer? –  ali_bahoo Nov 8 '10 at 23:07
    
Nothing, really, I just happened to test Gabr's solution first. Also, his suggestion of a single parameter for interval kind AND size was more elegant than a solution with TWO parameters for the same thing. In my opinion at least. –  Svein Bringsli Nov 9 '10 at 6:40
    
This is a very useful bit of code, I find the datetime tends to 'drift' if you increment it by hours or minutes many times. which can mess things up if you're working to a strict time series. A few niggles about your example though Svein, the default value didn't work for me, also the '(vTimeSec / SecsPerDay)' after the exit I think is a mistake, it shouldn't be there. My code with corrections & comments, is: –  SolarBrian Nov 12 '12 at 20:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Something like that (completely untested, written directly in browser):

function RoundToNearest(time, interval: TDateTime): TDateTime;
var
  time_sec, int_sec, rounded_sec: int64;
begin
  time_sec := Round(time * SecsPerDay);
  int_sec := Round(interval * SecsPerDay);
  rounded_sec := (time_sec div int_sec) * int_sec;
  if (rounded_sec + int_sec - time_sec) - (time_sec - rounded_sec) then
    rounded_sec := rounded_sec + time+sec;
  Result := rounded_sec / SecsPerDay;
end;

The code assumes you want rounding with second precision. Milliseconds are thrown away.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! There were some small errors, but I cleaned it up a bit :-) –  Svein Bringsli Nov 8 '10 at 17:12

Wow! guys, how do you complicate too much something so simple... also most of you loose the option to round to nearest 1/100 second, etc...

This one is much more simple and can also round to milisenconds parts:

function RoundToNearest(TheDateTime,TheRoundStep:TDateTime):TdateTime;
    begin
         if 0=TheRoundStep
         then begin // If round step is zero there is no round at all
                   RoundToNearest:=TheDateTime;
              end
         else begin // Just round to nearest multiple of TheRoundStep
                   RoundToNearest:=Round(TheDateTime/TheRoundStep)*TheRoundStep;
              end;
    end;

You can just test it with this common or not so common examples:

// Note: Scroll to bottom to see examples of round to 1/10 of a second, etc

// Round to nearest multiple of one hour and a half (round to 90'=1h30')
ShowMessage(FormatDateTime('hh:nn:ss.zzz'
                          ,RoundToNearest(EncodeTime(15,31,37,156)
                                         ,EncodeTime(1,30,0,0))
                          )
           );

// Round to nearest multiple of one hour and a quarter (round to 75'=1h15')
ShowMessage(FormatDateTime('hh:nn:ss.zzz'
                          ,RoundToNearest(EncodeTime(15,31,37,156)
                                         ,EncodeTime(1,15,0,0))
                          )
           );

// Round to nearest multiple of 60 minutes (round to hours)
ShowMessage(FormatDateTime('hh:nn:ss.zzz'
                          ,RoundToNearest(EncodeTime(15,31,37,156)
                                         ,EncodeTime(1,0,0,0))
                          )
           );

// Round to nearest multiple of 60 seconds (round to minutes)
ShowMessage(FormatDateTime('hh:nn:ss.zzz'
                          ,RoundToNearest(EncodeTime(15,31,37,156)
                                         ,EncodeTime(0,1,0,0))
                          )
           );

// Round to nearest multiple of second (round to seconds)
ShowMessage(FormatDateTime('hh:nn:ss.zzz'
                          ,RoundToNearest(EncodeTime(15,31,37,156)
                                         ,EncodeTime(0,0,1,0))
                          )
           );

// Round to nearest multiple of 1/100 seconds
ShowMessage(FormatDateTime('hh:nn:ss.zzz'
                          ,RoundToNearest(EncodeTime(15,31,37,141)
                                         ,EncodeTime(0,0,0,100))
                          )
           );

// Round to nearest multiple of 1/100 seconds
    ShowMessage(FormatDateTime('hh:nn:ss.zzz'
                          ,RoundToNearest(EncodeTime(15,31,37,156)
                                         ,EncodeTime(0,0,0,100))
                          )
           );

// Round to nearest multiple of 1/10 seconds
    ShowMessage(FormatDateTime('hh:nn:ss.zzz'
                          ,RoundToNearest(EncodeTime(15,31,37,151)
                                         ,EncodeTime(0,0,0,10))
                          )
           );

// Round to nearest multiple of 1/10 seconds
    ShowMessage(FormatDateTime('hh:nn:ss.zzz'
                          ,RoundToNearest(EncodeTime(15,31,37,156)
                                         ,EncodeTime(0,0,0,10))
                          )
           );

Hope this helps people like me, that need to round to 1/100, 1/25 or 1/10 seconds.

share|improve this answer

If you want to RoundUp or RoundDown ... like Ceil and Floor...

Here there are (do not forget to add Math unit to your uses clause):

function RoundUpToNearest(TheDateTime,TheRoundStep:TDateTime):TDateTime;
    begin
         if 0=TheRoundStep
         then begin // If round step is zero there is no round at all
                   RoundUpToNearest:=TheDateTime;
              end
         else begin // Just round up to nearest bigger or equal multiple of TheRoundStep
                   RoundUpToNearest:=Ceil(TheDateTime/TheRoundStep)*TheRoundStep;
              end;
    end;

function RoundDownToNearest(TheDateTime,TheRoundStep:TDateTime):TDateTime;
    begin
         if 0=TheRoundStep
         then begin // If round step is zero there is no round at all
                   RoundDownToNearest:=TheDateTime;
              end
         else begin // Just round down to nearest lower or equal multiple of TheRoundStep
                   RoundDownToNearest:=Floor(TheDateTime/TheRoundStep)*TheRoundStep;
              end;
    end;

And of course with a minor change (use Float type instead of TDateTime type) if can also be used to Round, RoundUp and RoundDown decimal/float values to a decimal/float step.

Here they are:

function RoundUpToNearest(TheValue,TheRoundStep:Float):Float;
    begin
         if 0=TheRoundStep
         then begin // If round step is zero there is no round at all
                   RoundUpToNearest:=TheValue;
              end
         else begin // Just round up to nearest bigger or equal multiple of TheRoundStep
                   RoundUpToNearest:=Ceil(TheValue/TheRoundStep)*TheRoundStep;
              end;
    end;

function RoundToNearest(TheValue,TheRoundStep:Float):Float;
    begin
         if 0=TheRoundStep
         then begin // If round step is zero there is no round at all
                   RoundToNearest:=TheValue;
              end
         else begin // Just round to nearest multiple of TheRoundStep
                   RoundToNearest:=Floor(TheValue/TheRoundStep)*TheRoundStep;
              end;
    end;

function RoundDownToNearest(TheValue,TheRoundStep:Float):Float;
    begin
         if 0=TheRoundStep
         then begin // If round step is zero there is no round at all
                   RoundDownToNearest:=TheDateTime;
              end
         else begin // Just round down to nearest lower or equal multiple of TheRoundStep
                   RoundDownToNearest:=Floor(TheValue/TheRoundStep)*TheRoundStep;
              end;
    end;

If you want to use both types (TDateTime and Float) on same unit... add overload directive on interface section, example:

function RoundUpToNearest(TheDateTime,TheRoundStep:TDateTime):TDateTime;overload;
function RoundToNearest(TheDateTime,TheRoundStep:TDateTime):TDateTime;overload;
function RoundDownToNearest(TheDateTime,TheRoundStep:TDateTime):TDateTime;overload;

function RoundUpToNearest(TheValue,TheRoundStep:Float):Float;overload;
function RoundToNearest(TheValue,TheRoundStep:Float):Float;overload;
function RoundDownToNearest(TheValue,TheRoundStep:Float):Float;overload;
share|improve this answer

Try the DateUtils unit.
But to round on a minute, hour or even second, just Decode and then encode the date value, with milliseconds, seconds and minutes set to zero. Rounding to multiples of minutes or hours just means: decode, round up or down the hours or minutes, then encode again.
To encode/decode time values, use EncodeTime/DecodeTime from SysUtils. Use EncodeDate/DecodeDate for dates. It should be possible to create your own rounding functions with all of this.
Also, the SysUtils function has constants like MSecsPerDay, SecsPerDay, SecsPerMin, MinsPerHour and HoursPerDay. A time is basically the number of milliseconds past midnight. You can miltiply Frac(Time) with MSecsPerDay, which is the exact number of milliseconds.
Unfortunately, since time values are floats, there's always a chance of small rounding errors, thus you might not get the expected value...

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Here is an untested code with adjustable precision.

Type
  TTimeDef = (tdSeconds, tdMinutes, tdHours, tdDays)

function ToClosest( input : TDateTime; TimeDef : TTimeDef ; Range : Integer ) : TDateTime
var 
  Coeff : Double;
RInteger : Integer;
DRInteger : Integer;
begin
  case TimeDef of
    tdSeconds :  Coeff := SecsPerDay;  
    tdMinutes : Coeff := MinsPerDay;
    tdHours : Coeff :=  MinsPerDay/60;
    tdDays : Coeff := 1;
  end;

  RInteger := Trunc(input * Coeff);
  DRInteger := RInteger div Range * Range
  result := DRInteger / Coeff;
  if (RInteger - DRInteger) >= (Range / 2) then
    result := result + Range / Coeff;

end;
share|improve this answer

This is a very useful bit of code, I use this because I find the datetime tends to 'drift' if you increment it by hours or minutes many times over, which can mess things up if you're working to a strict time series. eg so 00:00:00.000 becomes 23:59:59.998 I implemented Sveins version of Gabrs code, but I suggest a few amendments: The default value didn't work for me, also the '(vTimeSec / SecsPerDay)' after the exit I think is a mistake, it shouldn't be there. My code with corrections & comments, is:

    Procedure TNumTool.RoundDateTimeToNearestInterval
                        (const ATime:TDateTime; AInterval:TDateTime{=5*60/SecsPerDay}; Var Result:TDateTime);
    var                                            //Rounds to nearest 5-minute by default
      vTimeSec,vIntSec,vRoundedSec : int64;     //NB datetime values are in days since 12/30/1899 as a double
    begin
      if AInterval = 0 then
        AInterval := 5*60/SecsPerDay;                 // no interval given - use default value of 5 minutes
      vTimeSec := round(ATime * SecsPerDay);          // input time in seconds as integer
      vIntSec  := round(AInterval * SecsPerDay);      // interval time in seconds as integer
      if vIntSec = 0 then
        exit;                                           // interval is zero -cannot round the datetime;
      vRoundedSec := round(vTimeSec / vIntSec) * vIntSec;   // rounded time in seconds as integer
      Result      := vRoundedSec / SecsPerDay;              // rounded time in days as tdatetime (double)
    end;
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