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Is it possible to use a Windows 7 TaskDialog in PowerShell?

I'd like to convert the following messagebox to a TaskDialog:

[System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox]::Show(
    "There are currently one or more Microsoft Office applications running.`n`nYou must close down all open Office applications before the template update can continue.", 
    "Updating Templates", 
    [System.Windows.Forms.MessageBoxButtons]::RetryCancel, 
    [System.Windows.Forms.MessageBoxIcon]::Warning )

Anyone know how/if this can be done?

Thanks,

Ben

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to use Microsoft's Windows API CodePack for this, it's very simple, but although it will work fine from PowerShell ISE, PoshConsole, PowerGUI etc -- I don't believe it will work in PowerShell.exe because the console loads the wrong version of comctl32.dll (the common controls library).

# import the library dll from wherever you put it:
add-type -path .\Libraries\Microsoft.WindowsAPICodePack.dll

# Create and configure the TaskDialog
$td = New-Object Microsoft.WindowsAPICodePack.Dialogs.TaskDialog
$td.Caption = "Updating Templates"
$td.Text = "There are currently one or more Microsoft Office applications running.`n`nYou must close down all open Office applications before the template update can continue."
$td.StandardButtons = "Retry,Cancel"
$td.Icon = "Warning"

# Show the dialog and capture the resulting choice
$result = $td.Show()  # will return either "Retry" or "Cancel" 

Hopefully it's obvious that the $result value is actually an enumeration value (of type [Microsoft.WindowsAPICodePack.Dialogs.TaskDialogResult]) ... but in PowerShell you can basically treat it as a string or an int if you like.

Of course, this is barely scratching the surface of what you can do with a TaskDialog -- if you use it with just this code, it will look and behave very similarly to your current dialog -- but you can explore the other possibilities yourself -- I can recommend the TaskDialog builder tool from this MSDN Magazine Article as a way to learn the many options.

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You can use the Add-Type cmdlet to compile a C# class on the fly and import the type. So you can just wriet up the C# code to interface with the native TaskDialog function and then use it from PowerShell. You can use this library from CodeProject for example. Build it and then use

Add-Type -File TaskDialog.dll

You can then re-create the samples shown in the article.

$taskDialog = New-Object Microsoft.Samples.TaskDialog
$taskDialog.WindowTitle = "My Application"
$taskDialog.MainInstruction = "Do you want to do this?"
$taskDialog.CommonButtons = [Microsoft.Samples.TaskDialogCommonButtons]::Yes -bor [Microsoft.Samples.TaskDialogCommonButtons]::No
$result = $taskDialog.Show()
if ($result -eq 6)
{
    # Do it.

}

However, I notice that PowerShell cannot find the entry point into the common controls DLL. Not much of a clue as to that, perhaps the P/Invoke declaration in the C# code would have to request a specific version or so for that to work. Sorry. You could probably still encapsulate the necessary stuff into a small command-line application you can then run. Not ideal but perhaps the easiest route.

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Sorry - still a bit confused. How would I use the code in the article, as this is c#? Think I'm missing something... –  Ben Nov 8 '10 at 13:54
    
Translate it into the equivalent PowerShell code. You can create objects with New-Object and then set properties just normally. –  Joey Nov 8 '10 at 14:21

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