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I have a number crunching C program which involves a main loop with two conditionals:

for (i = 0; i < N; i++) {
 for (j = 0; j < N; j++) {
  for (k = 0; k < N; k++) {
    if (k == i || k == j) continue;
    ...(calculate a, b, c, d (depending on k)  
    if (a*a + b*b + c*c < d*d) {break;}
  } //k
 } //j
} //i

The hardware here is the SPE of the Cell processor, where there is a big penalty when using branching. So in order to optimize my program for speedup I need to remove these 2 conditionals, do you know about good strategies for this?

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What happens in the .... break; –  Preet Sangha Nov 8 '10 at 10:09
    
just only the break, so: {break;} –  flow Nov 8 '10 at 10:19
    
Isn't there penalty only for incorrectly predicted branches? May be a hint to compiler about expected results would help? –  blaze Nov 8 '10 at 11:07
    
@blaze, how could I tell that to te compiler? –  flow Nov 8 '10 at 12:44
1  
@Werner, you'd have to check the optimization guide for your processor. It may tell you something about the way the processor predicts branches. E.g. modern Intels predict conditional branches to be not taken. Then you reformulate the branching condition to match expectations of the processor. –  user434507 Nov 8 '10 at 13:44

4 Answers 4

For the first one, you could break it into multiple loops, eg change:

for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
  for(int j = 0; j < 1000; j++) {
    for(int k = 0; k < 1000; k++) {
      if(k==i || k == j) continue;
      // other code
    }
  }

to:

for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
  for(int j = 0; j < 1000; j++) {
    for(int k = 0; k < min(i, j); k++) {
      // other code
    }
    for(int k = min(i, j) + 1; k < max(i, j); k++) {
      // other code
    }
    for(int k = max(i, j) + 1; k < 1000; k++) {
      // other code
    }
  }

To remove the second, you could store the previous total and use it in the for loop conditions, i.e.:

int left_side = 1, right_side = 0;
for(int i = 0; i < N; i++)
  for(int j = 0; j < N; j++) {
    for(int k = 0; k < min(i, j) && left_side >= right_side; k++) {
      // other code (calculate a, b, c, d)
      left_side = a * a + b * b + c * c;
      right_side = d * d;
    }
    for(int k = min(i, j) + 1; k < max(i, j) && left_side >= right_side; k++) {
      // same as in previous loop
    }
    for(int k = max(i, j) + 1; k < N && left_side >= right_side; k++) {
      // same as in previous loop
    }
  }

Implementing min and max without branching could also be tricky. Maybe this version is better:

int i, j, k, 
  left_side = 1, right_side = 0;
for(i = 0; i < N; i++) {
  // this loop covers the case where j < i
  for(j = 0; j < i; j++) {
    k = 0;
    for(; k < j && left_side >= right_side; k++) {
      // other code (calculate a, b, c, d)
      left_side = a * a + b * b + c * c;
      right_side = d * d;
    }
    k++; // skip k == j
    for(; k < i && left_side >= right_side; k++) {
      // same as in previous loop
    }
    k++; // skip k == i
    for(; k < N && left_side >= right_side; k++) {
      // same as in previous loop
    }
  }
  j++; // skip j == i
  // and now, j > i
  for(; j < N; j++) {
    k = 0;
    for(; k < i && left_side >= right_side; k++) {
      // other code (calculate a, b, c, d)
      left_side = a * a + b * b + c * c;
      right_side = d * d;
    }
    k++; // skip k == i
    for(; k < j && left_side >= right_side; k++) {
      // same as in previous loop
    }
    k++; // skip k == j
    for(; k < N && left_side >= right_side; k++) {
      // same as in previous loop
    }
  }
}
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this is a very good idea! but just in the case I had not the other "if" inside. now the program has to evaluat the second "if" three times, so performance degrades –  flow Nov 8 '10 at 10:22
    
@Werner: edited –  sje397 Nov 8 '10 at 10:49
    
Don't the conditions in the for statements induce extra branching ? –  Alexandre C. Nov 8 '10 at 11:22
    
@Alexandre - No more than you'd have anyway. You'll need to run the loop that many times, checking for loop termination each time. All this code just reduces (possibly) redundant loop checking. –  Chris Lutz Nov 8 '10 at 11:26
    
@Alexander C.: I was assuming 'or' constructions (where multiple code paths could occur - so, including 'if' statements) that were branches. This way, it's do the thing or do nothing (not even break). But you could well be right - I just assumed the for conditions were ok because they appeared in the question. –  sje397 Nov 8 '10 at 11:26

I agree with 'sje397'.

Besides this, you provide too little information about your problem. You say branching is pricey. But how often does it actually happen? Maybe your problem is that compiler-generated code does branching in the common scenario?

Perhaps you could re-arrange your if-s. The implementation of the if is actually compiler-dependent, bust many compilers treat it in a straight-forward way. That is: if - common - else - rare (jump).

Then try the following:

for (i = 0; i < N; i++) {
 for (j = 0; j < N; j++) {
  for (k = 0; k < N; k++) {
    if (k != i && k != j)
    {
      ...(calculate a, b, c, d)  
      if (a*a + b*b + c*c >= d*d)
      {
        ...
      } else
        break;
    }
  } //k
 } //j
} //i

EDIT:

Of course you may go into assembler level to ensure correct code generated.

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Good point. It's only mis-predicted branches that are expensive... –  celion Nov 8 '10 at 11:32

I would look first at your calculate code, because that could swamp all these branching issues. Some sampling would find out for sure.

However, it looks like you're doing, for each i,j, a linear search for the first point inside a sphere. Could you have 3 arrays, one for each of the X, Y, and Z axes, and in each array store indexes of all the original points in ascending order by that axis? That could facilitate a nearest-neighbor search. Also, you might be able to use an in-cube test, rather than an in-sphere test, since you're not hunting for the closest point, but only a nearby point.

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the idea of the calculation is rather close to your guess, but implemented in a different way, you are very smart :) –  flow Nov 9 '10 at 22:47

Are you sure you actually need the first if-statement? Even if it jumps one calculation when k equals i or j, the penalty for checking it every iteration is very costly. Also, keep in mind that if N is not a constant, the compiler probably wont be able to unroll the for loops.

Although, if it's a cell processor, the compiler might even try to vectorize the loops.

If the for loops compiles to normal iterative loops it could be an idea to make them compare with zero instead, as the decrement operation will often do the comparison for you when it hits zero.

for (i = 0; i < N; i++) {

...can become...

for (i = N; i != 0; i--) {

Although, if "i" is used as an index or a variable in a calculation, you might get performance degradation as you will get cache misses.

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