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Do I use varchar(36) or are there any better ways to do it?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 40 down vote accepted

My DBA asked me when I asked about the best way to store GUIDs for my objects why I needed to store 16 bytes when I could do the same thing in 4 bytes with an Integer. Since he put that challenge out there to me I thought now was a good time to mention it. That being said...

You can store a guid as a CHAR(16) binary if you want to make the most optimal use of storage space.

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67  
Because with 16 bytes, you can generate things in different databases, on different machines, at different times, and still merge the data together seamlessly :) –  Billy ONeal Sep 2 '10 at 0:12
2  
right on the money :) –  Theodore Zographos Jun 6 '11 at 19:21
1  
need reply, what really is a char 16 binary? not char? not binary? I dont see that type in any of the mysql gui tools, nor any documentation in mysql site. @BillyONeal –  nawfal Jun 24 '12 at 19:41
1  
@nawfal: Char is the datatype. BINARY is the type specifier against the type. The only effect it has is to modify how MySQL does collation. See dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/charset-binary-op.html for more details. Of course you can just use a BINARY type directly if your database editing tool allows you to do that. (Older tools don't know of the binary data type but do know of the binary column flag) –  Billy ONeal Jun 25 '12 at 3:48
3  
There are several good reasons why a GUID is far better than a autoincrement. Jeff Atwood lists these one. To me, the best advantage in using a GUID is that my app won't need a database roundtrip to know the key of an entity: I could populate it programmatically, which I could not do if I were using an auto-increment field. This saved me from several headaches: with GUID I can manage the entity in the same way, regardless of the entity has been already persisted or it a brand new one. –  Arialdo Martini Dec 30 '12 at 9:11

I would store it as a char(36).

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Adding to the answer by ThaBadDawg, use these handy functions (thanks to a wiser collegue of mine) to get from 36 length string back to a byte array of 16.

DELIMITER $$

CREATE FUNCTION `GuidToBinary`(
    $Data VARCHAR(36)
) RETURNS binary(16)
BEGIN
    DECLARE $Result BINARY(16) DEFAULT NULL;
    IF $Data IS NOT NULL THEN
        SET $Data = REPLACE($Data,'-','');
        SET $Result =
            CONCAT( UNHEX(SUBSTRING($Data,7,2)), UNHEX(SUBSTRING($Data,5,2)),
                    UNHEX(SUBSTRING($Data,3,2)), UNHEX(SUBSTRING($Data,1,2)),
                    UNHEX(SUBSTRING($Data,11,2)),UNHEX(SUBSTRING($Data,9,2)),
                    UNHEX(SUBSTRING($Data,15,2)),UNHEX(SUBSTRING($Data,13,2)),
                    UNHEX(SUBSTRING($Data,17,16)));
    END IF;
    RETURN $Result;
END

$$

CREATE FUNCTION `ToGuid`(
    $Data BINARY(16)
) RETURNS char(36) CHARSET utf8
BEGIN
    DECLARE $Result CHAR(36) DEFAULT NULL;
    IF $Data IS NOT NULL THEN
        SET $Result =
            CONCAT(
                HEX(SUBSTRING($Data,4,1)), HEX(SUBSTRING($Data,3,1)),
                HEX(SUBSTRING($Data,2,1)), HEX(SUBSTRING($Data,1,1)), '-', 
                HEX(SUBSTRING($Data,6,1)), HEX(SUBSTRING($Data,5,1)), '-',
                HEX(SUBSTRING($Data,8,1)), HEX(SUBSTRING($Data,7,1)), '-',
                HEX(SUBSTRING($Data,9,2)), '-', HEX(SUBSTRING($Data,11,6)));
    END IF;
    RETURN $Result;
END

CHAR(16) is actually a BINARY(16), choose your preferred flavour

To follow the code better, take the example given the digit-ordered GUID below. (Illegal characters are used for illustrative purposes - each place a unique character.) The functions will transform the byte ordering to achieve a bit order for superior index clustering. The reordered guid is shown below the example.

12345678-9ABC-DEFG-HIJK-LMNOPQRSTUVW
78563412-BC9A-FGDE-HIJK-LMNOPQRSTUVW

Dashes removed:

123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVW
78563412BC9AFGDEHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVW
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Here's the above GuidToBinary without removing the hyphens from the string: CREATE FUNCTION GuidToBinary($guid char(36)) RETURNS binary(16) RETURN CONCAT( UNHEX(SUBSTRING($guid, 7, 2)), UNHEX(SUBSTRING($guid, 5, 2)), UNHEX(SUBSTRING($guid, 3, 2)), UNHEX(SUBSTRING($guid, 1, 2)), UNHEX(SUBSTRING($guid, 12, 2)), UNHEX(SUBSTRING($guid, 10, 2)), UNHEX(SUBSTRING($guid, 17, 2)), UNHEX(SUBSTRING($guid, 15, 2)), UNHEX(SUBSTRING($guid, 20, 4)), UNHEX(SUBSTRING($guid, 25, 12))); –  Jonathan Oliver Jan 15 '13 at 14:33
2  
For the curious, these functions are superior to just UNHEX(REPLACE(UUID(),'-','')) because it arranges the bits in an order that will perform better in a clustered index. –  Slashterix Feb 2 at 1:28
    
This is very helpful, but I feel it could be improved with a source for CHAR and BINARY equivalency (the docs seem to imply there are important differences and an explanation of why clustered index performance is better with reordered bytes. –  Patrick M Sep 8 at 21:48

char(36) would be a good choice. Also MySQL's UUID() function can be used which returns a 36-character text format (hex with hyphens) which can be used for retrievals of such IDs from the db.

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"Better" depends on what you're optimizing for.

How much do you care about storage size/performance vs. ease of development? More importantly - are you generating enough GUIDs, or fetching them frequently enough, that it matters?

If the answer is "no", char(36) is more than good enough, and it makes storing/fetching GUIDs dead-simple. Otherwise, binary(16) is reasonable, but you'll have to lean on MySQL and/or your programming language of choice to convert back and forth from the usual string representation.

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If you host the software (ie a web page for example) and don't sell/install in the client, you can always start with char(36) for easy development in the early stage of the software, and mutate to a more compact format as the system grows in usage and starts needing optimization. –  Xavi Montero Sep 13 at 8:27

Binary(16) would be fine, better than use of varchar(32).

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