Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

i'm new in LINQ.
I wanna query all rows that the description column string (example value "i am feeling lucky today.") contains/match any item in a List<string> lst.
Example the list items contain {"lucky", "bad", "ok" }.
I would like to achieve by using linq only, but I am confuse are below methods correct??
thanks.

Option 1:
var item =
from a in datatbl.AsEnumerable()
from b in lst
where a.Field<string>("description").contains(b)
select a;

Option 2:
var item =
from a in datatbl.AsEnumerable()
where lst.Any(x=> a.Field<string>("description").Contains(x))
select a;

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Both of your options should work (change contains to Contains). But if you want to be case-insensitive, you will need to use a ToUpper or something.

For example, this code provides a "test jig" and handles case insensitivity.

        DataTable datatbl = new DataTable();
        datatbl.Columns.Add(new DataColumn("description",typeof(string)));
        // add simple test rows
        datatbl.Rows.Add("I'm feeling lucky today.");
        datatbl.Rows.Add("I'm feeling bad today.");
        datatbl.Rows.Add("I'm feeling good today.");
        // more test rows here...
        List<string> lst = new List<string>(new string[] { "Lucky", "bad", "ok" });

        var item =
            from a in datatbl.AsEnumerable()
            from b in lst
            where a.Field<string>("description").ToUpper().Contains(b.ToUpper())
            select a;

        var item2 =
            from a in datatbl.AsEnumerable()
            where lst.Any(x => a.Field<string>("description").ToUpper().Contains(x.ToUpper()))
            select a;
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 - I realize how I had misread the question :) In addition to your solutions, you could also use the following where-clause, eliminating the need to perform upper-case conversion of the strings: where string.Compare(a.Field<string>("description"), b, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) == 0 – Fredrik Mörk Nov 8 '10 at 13:19
    
Les, Fredrik, thanks for the reply. it's very useful and this is what i want. ;) i'm going to try on that when i back to my work station. – momo Nov 9 '10 at 0:49

Found out that if one row value is I'm not feeling Lucky, bad or ok today. with Linq below:

List<string> lst = new List<string>(new string[] { "Lucky", "bad", "ok" });
var item =  from a in datatbl.AsEnumerable()
            from b in lst
            where a.Field<string>("description").ToUpper().Contains(b.ToUpper())
            select a;

the result will return me 3 duplicated records of the same row, seem like it's not distinct by default. is this the case of above linq??

To get the distinct rows, i need to revise to:

List<string> lst = new List<string>(new string[] { "Lucky", "bad", "ok" });
var item =  (from a in datatbl.AsEnumerable()
            from b in lst
            where a.Field<string>("description").ToUpper().Contains(b.ToUpper())
            select a).Distinct();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.