Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is my dilemma,

8 table

Upto 72 columns

Including datatypes int, smallint, decimal ,smalldatetime, char

Nothing to scary there.

I have created unique data sets 100 rows, 1000 rows 10000 rows 50000 rows 100000 rows, 500000 rows for but they in insert statements. This is for volumetric testing.

When attempting to run the 50K query the sql server ran out of memory.

What are my options.! Will I need to breaking to small queries; can I commit every X rows and how can I determine the max row is there a better way than insert statements>? Excel and access ruled out due volume of data.

Has any one an example loop t-sql statement to create different types data?

share|improve this question
    
This is why Bulk Insert exists. Not answering, as I can't find any examples of converting DataSet operations into a bulk insert job. –  Will Nov 8 '10 at 12:55
1  
This isn't really an answer to your question, but Redgate have a handy wee tool for doing this sort of thing: red-gate.com/products/SQL_Data_Generator –  Paddy Nov 8 '10 at 12:55
    
What version of SQL Server are you using? –  JNK Nov 8 '10 at 13:28
    
It would really help understand your problem if you posted the code that is breaking. That SQL Server is out of memory on a 50K line insert is actually pretty surprising. –  mlibby Nov 8 '10 at 13:34
    
Thanks Will, I will be looking into bulk inserts, Like a fat kid on doughnuts, I have very little T-SQL experience Oracle is normally my choosen poison. –  icecurtain Nov 8 '10 at 13:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Split portions of insert statements with "GO" keyword. It will end one batch and begin another one. For easyness of test generation it will be normal to split every line with "GO".

insert into XXX (1, 2, 3, ...)
...
insert into XXX (2, 3, 4, ...)
GO
insert into XXX (3, 4, 5, ...)
...
insert into XXX (4, 5, 6, ...)
GO

or

insert into XXX (1, 2, 3, ...)
GO
insert into XXX (2, 3, 4, ...)
GO
insert into XXX (3, 4, 5, ...)
GO
share|improve this answer
    
While this is correct, you may want to start with 500 statements per batch (a batch is the set of statements before a GO). –  StingyJack Nov 8 '10 at 13:15
    
nope this bad boy appears again –  icecurtain Nov 8 '10 at 14:59
    
Cannot execute script. =================================== Insufficient memory to continue the execution of the program. (mscorlib) –  icecurtain Nov 8 '10 at 15:00

"Has any one an example loop t-sql statement to create different types data?"

Loop is also available.

declare @i int
set @i = 0
while @i<50000
begin
  set @i = @i+1
  insert into XXX (@i, 1, 2, 3)
end
share|improve this answer
1  
This is not helpful, and poor practice. –  StingyJack Nov 8 '10 at 13:16
    
if the commit occurs after each loop completes (50000) then you run another loop - doesn't that address the OP concern? –  Randy Nov 8 '10 at 13:21
    
What is the "OP"? –  Badiboy Nov 8 '10 at 13:25
    
OP = original poster –  mlibby Nov 8 '10 at 13:46
    
Aaaa... Possible. :) The original post contains two questions, thus here is two answers. The question about loop, as I understand, is a standalone one... –  Badiboy Nov 8 '10 at 15:16

BULK INSERT is exactly for this kind of scenario - loading bulks of data into SQL server. Why is it way more efficient and faster than normaln inserts? Because B-Trees are built from bottom-up instead of normal top-down insert-and-split approach.

share|improve this answer

Since you are using .NET framework, you should probably look into the updateBatchSize parameter on the dataadapter. It will take care of a lot of the internals for you. More info @ msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/kbbwt18a(VS.80).aspx

share|improve this answer

Use SSIS and in DataFlowTask it has option to specify the batch size.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.