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I have drawn a circle in windows form

Pen pen = new Pen(Color.Black, 3); Graphics gr = this.CreateGraphics(); gr.DrawEllipse(pen, 5,5,20,20);

How to delete it...

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Either use Graphics.Clear() with a desired color, use the logic I posted as an answer, or perform this.Invalidate(). The last will simply force the form to redraw it's client area which will effectively delete the circle. –  Chris Hutchinson Nov 8 '10 at 14:23
    
Since you are using this.CreateGraphics, you are probably not drawing this in the Paint event. That means any time your form gets redrawn (either because you call the Invalidate method or because Windows sends a WM_PAINT message), your circle will be erased anyway. If you want the circle to be semi-permanent (at least to stay there until you explicitly erase it), you need to make sure that you draw it in the Paint event handler for your form, using the Graphics object that is passed in the PaintEventArgs for the event. –  Cody Gray Nov 8 '10 at 14:37
    
Just minimize the window and restore it again. –  Hans Passant Nov 8 '10 at 14:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can invalidate the draw region you want to refresh for example:

 this.Invalidate();

on the form...

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You have to clear your Graphic:

Graphics.Clear();

But all drawn figures will be cleared. Simply, you will then need to redraw all figures except that circle.

Also, you can use the Invalidate method:

Control.Invalidate()

It indicates a region to be redrawn inside your Graphics. But if you have intersecting figures you will have to redraw the figures you want visible inside the region except the circle.

This can become messy, you may want to check out how to design a control graph or use any graph layout library.

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I don't see what a control graph (aka flowchart) has to do with this question. –  Ben Voigt Nov 8 '10 at 14:38
    
A control graph is usually at the basis of how a graphic layout engine is built. Therefore, it could help determine what needs to be drawn or invalidated. Its just a opening on the subject... –  Cédric Guillemette Nov 8 '10 at 14:51

You can make a figure of same dimensions using the backColor of your control in which you are drawing

use after your code to clear your figure.

Pen p = new Pen(this.BackColor);   
gr.DrawEllipse(p, 5,5,20,20);
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You don't "delete" it per se, there's nothing to delete. It's a drawing, you draw something else over it or you can call the Graphics.Clear() method.

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You're correct, but if he's drawing in Paint/OnPaint then he can simply include a flag to draw a circle or not, then invalidate the form. The form's internal logic will redraw it's client area without the circle. –  Chris Hutchinson Nov 8 '10 at 14:18

Assuming you're subscribing to the Paint event or overriding the protected OnPaint routine, then you will need to perform something like this:

bool paint = false;

protected override void OnPaint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e)
{
  if (paint) 
  {
   // Draw circle.
  }
}

Then when you want to stop painting a circle:

paint = false;
this.Invalidate(); // Forces a redraw
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This has the benefit of allowing the form to redraw it's client area. Using Graphics.Clear will paint over the client area with a solid color. –  Chris Hutchinson Nov 8 '10 at 14:19
    
If a square is inside the circle and you invalidate the region surrounding the circle, the square will also be invalidated. Using this technique you will have to draw anything that is inside that region that you may want visible. –  Cédric Guillemette Nov 8 '10 at 14:20
    
Which is easily done if you simply put that logic outside the conditional check and force invalidation when you want the form to be redrawn. The OnPaint logic is called every single time the form invalidates a region (or the entire form client area). –  Chris Hutchinson Nov 8 '10 at 14:26

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