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Is there a need to encapsulate Collections?

say

private List<Item> items;

public Items Items
{
    get { return this.items; }
    set { this.items= value; }
}

or just

public List<Item> Items;

EDIT:

  • Is there a way to bind to the collection without exposing the public getter?
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3  
Not much encapsulation... –  CesarGon Nov 8 '10 at 14:23

7 Answers 7

I generally expose collections as read-only. There's typically no reason to assign a new collection. I'll instantiate the collection one time in the constructor or property getter. This reduces the possibility of null reference errors.

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+1, exposing collections to modification is a almost always a bad idea and not what you want. You may want to expose a method to add to the collection (or delete from it), but giving control of the whole collection is generaly not good. –  Steve Haigh Nov 8 '10 at 14:34
    
"This reduces the possibility of null reference errors." I think approach is common to all the class members, not specially to collections. –  serhio Nov 8 '10 at 14:36
    
IMO, there is not only "no reason to assign a new collection", it could have side effects. See my answer. –  Stefan Steinegger Nov 8 '10 at 14:48

Making collections public is quite a bad idea. While encapsulating fields is important in any case, collections are even more important.

The collection itself is usually not an object you actually care about. So the caller of your class shouldn't be able to set it, replace it or even take it away (say: set to null). It should only care about the items in it. If you make it possible to set the list instance from the outside, you risk that several instances of your class share the same list instance. This will have some nasty side effects.

Your class is responsible (at least) to create the list instance to make sure that it is a dedicated list and never a null reference.

Exposing the list by a public getter is actually like fully exposing it. This is the minimal encapsulation you should do, it is actually like no encapsulation at all.

Full encapsulation is done by only exposing the items as IEnumerable and provide Add, Remove, Count and similar operations in separate methods or properties. The more you need, the more it gets complicated. It is useful if you really don't need many basic operations from the outside and manage as much as possible within the class.

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sometiles I need to bind to myObject.Items, so I need to externalize the collection. –  serhio Nov 8 '10 at 14:28
    
in that case you could still manipulate the collection. Items.Clear(), Items.Add, Items.Remove, etc... –  hunter Nov 8 '10 at 14:30
    
"exposing the items as IEnumerable" - you can always cast it to the initial List<Item> –  serhio Nov 8 '10 at 14:34
1  
@serhio: you never can avoid misusing something. IMO, encapsulation it is not about "security", to avoid that anybode does something evil. It is only to make clear how it is intended to be used. You could also use reflection to change the private fields ... but then you know that the class is not intended to be used like this. –  Stefan Steinegger Nov 8 '10 at 14:36
    
@Stefan Steinegger: I am not sure that if exposed as IEnumerable that collection remains write-bindable... –  serhio Nov 8 '10 at 14:40

Public fields are, in general, frowned upon in the .NET world. Also, returning null collections from methods or properties is also frowned upon. Therefore, I'd definitely "encapsulate" the collection.

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There is a standard in .net that newly instantiated objects have their collections initialized to minimize null references. You will notice most of the framework libraries adhere to this.

public class PotOfUnicorns
{

    private List<Item> items = new List<Item>();

    public Items Items
    {
        get { return this.items; }
        private set { this.items= value; }
    }

}
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Some times I hook it up like so....

List<Item> _items;
public Items Items
{
    get 
    {
        if (_items == null) _items = new List<Items>();
        return _items;
    }
    private set { _items = value; }
}
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You are advised against making collection property setters public; see this rule on MSDN. Even better practice is to only expose the interface rather than concrete type.

class Example
{
     public Example()
     {
         this.MyList = new List<string>();
     }

     public IList<string> MyList { get; private set; }
}
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Creating a custom collection to wrap the standard collection so you can control what your callers do is the best option, however it has costs.

I think it comes down to how many different people will be writing code against your object model and weather these people are part of the same team as you.

You are stopping the callers doing “bad things” by encapsulation your collection; this is likely to save the callers debugging time and also make it easier for your callers to work out how to use your API.

So it is a trade of between your time and the time of the programmers that will be using your object model.

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