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Here is a piece of class :

public class OneControl
{
    ...

    public OneControl Content(Action value) {
        ContentProperty = value;
        return this;
    }

    public void Render()
    {
        ContentProperty();
    }

    ...
}

Then I got this in my view :

<div id="pleaseHelpMe">
    <% OneControlInstance.Content(() => { %> 
        Some Mixed Stuff <%= Example%> Euros
    <% }).Render() %>
</div>

I would like to use this syntax in my UI library, I know how to implement this but I don't know HOW it actually works !

I understand that somewhere and somewhat a delegate is created and provided as an argument of the method Content, but can't find any information about this mecanism or technic.

Can you enlight me ?

PS : I'll change the title according to the anwser I get.

Assumed current correct answer :

The compiler translates the aspx code below into (symbolic translation for comprehension) :

<div id="pleaseHelpMe">
    <% OneControlInstance.Content(() => {
        ViewPageInstance.Response.Write("Some Mixed Stuff ");
        ViewPageInstance.Response.Write(Example);
        ViewPageInstance.Response.Write(" Euros");
    }).Render() %>
</div>

Big thanks to Hogan !!

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1  
That's a tasty piece of class. –  annakata Nov 8 '10 at 15:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

() => { %> Some Mixed Stuff <%= Example%> Euros <% } is the delegate.

In an an .NET aspx page stuff outside of %> <% (the html stuff) gets translated into output.render(string) when the aspx page is compiled.

So this is the same as the delegate code:

() => 
{ 
  output.render(" Some Mixed Stuff "); 
  output.render(Example); 
  output.render(" Euros "); 
}

Prior comments:

Not sure what you are asking. Action value is the delegate. From the docs:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/018hxwa8.aspx

"Encapsulates a method that has a single parameter and does not return a value."

and

"You can use the Action(<T>) delegate to pass a method as a parameter without explicitly declaring a custom delegate."


If you want your delegate to return a value you can use TResult Func<in T, out TResult>

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ContentControls have a ContentProperty field which is essentially a delegate. Your class sets this value through a fluent interface (essentially the return this part of the Content method) - which is just a way of making development easier, nothing super relevant in itself - and this delegate wille ventually be executed by the Render method, which is part of the control lifespan.

The bit you might be missing is that you're providing the delegate action in your markup here:

<% OneControlInstance.Content(() => { %>   
        Some Mixed Stuff <%= Example%> Euros  
    <% }).Render() %> 

The action is everything inside the content method call, i.e. () => { stuff } which you shoudl try and read as an anonymous function with arguments in between the parens and function code in between the braces.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand this, but who transforms %> Html stuff<% into a delegate ? Is it the view engine ? The compiler ? –  Kronos Nov 8 '10 at 15:48
    
() => { %> Some Mixed Stuff <%= Example%> Euros <% } is the delegate. In an an .NET page stuff outside of %> <% (the html stuff) gets translated into output.render(string) when the aspx page is compiled. So this is the same as the delegate code: () => { output.render("some mixed stuff"); output.render(Example); output.render(" Euros"); } –  Hogan Nov 8 '10 at 17:21
    
OK, I see your point, nice ! However I think the interpretation comes from the view engine. –  Kronos Nov 8 '10 at 18:24
    
No the interpretation comes from the compiler. Do you mean something else by interpretation? –  Hogan Nov 8 '10 at 18:27
    
I got the answer, this is the compiler. –  Kronos Nov 8 '10 at 18:42

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