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I have been working with the DevExpress Filter TreeList code and am curious about why it throws a DevExpress.Utils.HideException.

My understanding is that exceptions are expensive and should be used sparingly and only in certain situations, but the code snippit below shows that we are always throwing the HideException without any specific events or code being tripped.

From FilterTreeList.cs

private void OnMouseDown(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
{
   if ( e.Button != MouseButtons.Left )
       return;

   TreeListHitInfo hitInfo = ((TreeList)sender).CalcHitInfo(e.Location);
   if ( hitInfo.HitInfoType == HitInfoType.Column )
   {
       ColumnInfo colInfo = ((TreeList)sender).ViewInfo.ColumnsInfo[hitInfo.Column];
       GridFilterButtonInfoArgs filterButtonInfo = GetFilterButtonInfoArgs(colInfo);

       if ( filterButtonInfo != null && filterButtonInfo.Bounds.Contains(e.Location) )
       {
           filterButtonInfo.State = ObjectState.Pressed;
               ((TreeList)sender).InvalidateColumnHeader(hitInfo.Column);

           throw new HideException();
       }
   }

Why are they throwing a HideException here, and what benefit does it serve?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's a program flow mechanism for clearing up the control's environment. Although it is true that exceptions are expensive compared to normal code (the archetypal example is using FormatExceptions in a loop that converts strings to ints -- hence the need for TryParse type methods), when compared to major changes in the UI, fetching data from the database, etc, they are very cheap and easy to maintain.

The demo code you're quoting is that exact scenario: the control is about to refresh its entire contents. The end-user has clicked on a specific icon to perform a specific action -- the exception is not "always" being thrown at all. My only beef with this sample code (and I stress that it is sample code) is that the action is being done at mouse down and not at mouse up.

I guess the argument is "could exceptions be used for this kind of macro program flow, or should we institute a hard-and-fast rule that they should only be used for error reporting?" But that's a whole other question.

Update

I'm told by the WinForms team:

HideException is our internal exception that is used to prevent default mouse events processing. We agree it's an old-fashioned way to stop code execution especially given that we already have the DXMouseEventArgs with an ability to set e.Handled = true. Unfortunately, the XtraTreeList doesn't currently fully support DXMouseEventArgs. We'll be adding this functionality in the next minor version and update the E2474 example accordingly.

So it'll be of archaeological interest in a month's time or so.

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Was the sample code submitted by a DevExpress developer? If so, just let them know they failed their internet code review (grin). All in all, I'm quite impressed with your support and your products, and having you (the DevExpress team) frequenting Stack Overflow just leaves me with a +1 Awesome feeling. –  George Stocker Nov 9 '10 at 0:44
    
I believe it was submitted by the DevExpress team. I am interested to hear their reasoning as to why they coded the example as such. @boyetboy my original question included the link where the code was taken from, there you'll see the action is executed in both OnMouseUp() and OnMouseDown(). –  amadib Nov 9 '10 at 17:46
1  
I'm told by the WinForms team: "HideException is our internal exception that is used to prevent default mouse events processing. We agree it's an old-fashioned way to stop code execution especially given that we already have the DXMouseEventArgs with an ability to set e.Handled = true. Unfortunately, the XtraTreeList doesn't currently fully support DXMouseEventArgs. We'll be adding this functionality in the next minor version and update the E2474 example accordingly." So it'll be of archaeological interest in a month's time or so... –  boyetboy Nov 9 '10 at 21:33
1  
I added your comment to your answer so that it would have some permanence, I hope you don't mind. –  George Stocker Nov 10 '10 at 2:36

I would say it's

  1. A bug
  2. Used for message signaling the way that calling Response.Redirect will throw a ThreadAbort exception to halt all code execution.
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Looks to me like they are using exceptions to control program flow. Some note in the docs that it prevents the base class method from getting called. That's pretty awful. The .NET framework way to do this without exceptions is the HandledMouseEventArgs class, used by OnMouseWheel().

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