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I'm using Java 6.

Suppose I had a bunch of cats to feed, and suppose myCats is sorted.

for (Cat cat : myCats) {

    feedDryFood(cat);

    //if this is the last cat (my favorite), give her a tuna
    if (...) 
        alsoFeedTuna(cat);
}

and I wanted to treat my last cat specially.

Is there a way to do this elegantly inside the loop? The only way I can think of is counting them.

Stepping back a little bit for a wider picture, is there any programming language that supports this little feature in a for-each loop?

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What is your real use of this? Can you treat the first item specially instead? –  starblue Nov 8 '10 at 17:01
    
The real use, I don't know, but I'm definitely learning a lot from the nice, smart people here. –  Russell Nov 8 '10 at 17:09
    
the amount of poor solutions with multiple up votes is very disturbing! –  Jarrod Roberson Nov 8 '10 at 17:39
5  
@fuzzy lollipop: Then please show us the way with a better solution. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Nov 8 '10 at 18:15

15 Answers 15

up vote 28 down vote accepted

If you need to do this, the best approach might be to use an Iterator. Other than that, you have to count. The iterator has a

hasNext()

method that you can use to determine if you are on the last item of your iterations.

EDIT -- To increase readability you can do something like the following within the Iterator based loop (psuedo):

Cat cat = iter.next();
feedDryFood(cat);

boolean shouldGetTuna = !iter.hasNext();
if (shouldGetTuna) 
    alsoFeedTuna(cat)

that is fairly self-documenting code via clever use of variable names.

share|improve this answer
2  
While this certainly answers the question, the only issue I have with it is that it doesn't make the requirement "the last cat is the favorite and gets tuna" very explicit from the code. Someone reading would have to think about why the cat is given tuna if the iterator doesn't have a next item. –  ColinD Nov 8 '10 at 17:48
1  
@colind, readability is very important. I updated my answer on how I would make it readable and self documenting. –  hvgotcodes Nov 8 '10 at 18:30

@fbcocq's solution

How was this a bad solution? Just add another local variable.

Cat lastCat = null;

for (Cat cat : myCats) {
  feedDryFood(cat);
  lastCat = cat;
}

alsoFeedTuna(lastCat);

Edit: set null first to take care of cases where myCats does not set lastCat

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think it's a bad solution, but it doesn't follow the OP's question, where they ask if there's an elegant way to do it inside the loop. –  Paul Sonier Nov 8 '10 at 23:47
    
IMHO, Its pretty elegent. Works in a few lines without special behaviour. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 24 '10 at 23:37
1  
What happens when myCats is empty? Wont you get an exception? –  mamnun Dec 2 '10 at 13:51
    
The question assumed it wasn't empty. Good point though. –  user500074 Dec 17 '10 at 19:34

There's no clear way to do it within the for-each loop, but a straightforward way would be to simply use an iterator directly (the for-each hides the iterator).

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6  
Why was this downvoted? –  BalusC Nov 8 '10 at 16:36
1  
@balusc: my question as well! –  Paul Sonier Nov 8 '10 at 17:22
3  
Someone went on a downvoting bender –  John Vint Nov 8 '10 at 19:18
    
yeah sometimes i get the feeling there are people out there that just want to let off some stream and go on a downvoting rampage just for fun. geek amok. –  Epaga Nov 9 '10 at 9:59

If it's a special behavior that has to happen to the last item in the loop, then it should take place outside the loop and you should provide way to let the information escape the loop:

Cat lastCat = null;
for (Cat cat : cats)
{
    // do something for each cat
    lastCat = cat;
}

if (lastCat != null)
{
    // do something special to last cat
}

I would recommend moving the blocks of these two statements into methods.

share|improve this answer

Use the iterator directly.

Cat cat
Iterator<Cat> i = myCats.iterator()
while (i.hasNext())
{
    cat = i.next()
    feedDryFood(cat);
    if (!i.hasNext())
    {
        alsoFeedTuna(cat); // Last cat.
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I think the best thing would be to set an indicator on the cat, isFavoured, or maybe a static member of the Cat class which points to the favourite (but this way you can only have one favourite). Then just look for the indicator when you're going through the loop. After all, cats don't always eat in the same order. ;)

for (Cat cat : myCats) {

    feedDryFood(cat);

    if (cat.isFavoured) 
        alsoFeedTuna(cat);
}

Alternatively, you could convert then list to an array and then it would be easy to know when you get to the last one - but what if the last one isn't your favourite?

//only a rough idea, may not compile / run perfectly
catArray = cats.toArray(cats);
for (int i = 0 ; i < catArray.length(); i++){
    feedDryFood(catArray [i]);

    //check for last cat.
    if (i == catArray.length()-1 ) 
        alsoFeedTuna(catArray [i]);
}

It is not clear which is more important: for the last cat to get tuna, OR for the favourite cat to get tuna. Or... is the last cat the favourite, by definition of being last? Please clarify!

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2  
If that happens, the last one will scratch him in the face. Then, next time through the loop, you can be sure it will be his favorite. –  bzlm Nov 8 '10 at 16:32
    
+1 for making me laugh at work. –  Russell Nov 8 '10 at 16:38
    
I'm in agreement with you about the isFavoured property on Cat or something similar... this is a much stronger design than having an arbitrary position in a list indicate which cat should get tuna (unless the design actually is simply "the last cat gets tuna" for some reason). I don't agree with a static field on Cat for this or with converting a List to an array... there generally isn't any good reason to do that. –  ColinD Nov 8 '10 at 16:38
2  
Nice idea, but won't apply when the condition is not dependent on the item itself. E.g. concatenating items to a commaseparated string. The condition then really depends on the item's position in the list. –  BalusC Nov 8 '10 at 16:38
3  
The last cat is always my favorite. When I tell them to line up before I feed them, I take it that the last cat is the humblest of all and deserves tuna. –  Russell Nov 8 '10 at 17:23

In regards to the question of whether any programming languages support this feature, Perl's Template Toolkit does:

[% FOR cat IN cats; feedDryFood(cat); alsoFeedTuna(cat) IF loop.last; END %]
share|improve this answer
    
Good to know, thanks! This means this feature is useful to some people after all. –  Russell Nov 8 '10 at 17:07

I would do it outside the loop.

The whole semantics of a foreach loop are that you do the same thing to every object. In this step though you're treating one object differently. To me it seems more sensible to do it outside of the loop.

Plus, the only ways I could think of to do it inside are horribly hacky...

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the for...each construct is not the proper tool to use to gain the specific behavior you are after as the question is worded, without having more features in the Cat object. The classic Iterator is designed to provide just this type of functionality. I think the question illustrates that the design is flawed, more on that latter.

Assuming that the there is a sorted list of cats called cats. A List that does not guarantee traversal order would not be a good candidate for iteration, regardless of how the list is traversed.

final Iterator<Cat> iterator = cats.iterator();
while (iterator.hasNext())
{
   final Cat cat = iterator.next();
   this.feedDryCatFood(cat);
   // special case, if there are no more cats in the list
   // feed the last one tuna as well.
   if (!iterator.hasNext())
   {
      this.alsoFeedTuna(cat);
   }
}

a better solution would be to have a member method on Cat. Cat.isSpecial() that returns a boolean. This would be more self documenting and move the behavior out of the loop construct. Then you could use a for...each construct with a simple test that is self contained and self documenting.

if (cat.isSpecial())
{
  this.feedTuna(cat);
}

I think the "last element of a for..each loop" in the question is a red herring. I think the problem is more a design problem than a business logic problem, and the fact that the for...each loop can't accommodate the rule is indicative that a refactoring should occur.

This new design would also accommodate multiple "special" cats without any complication to the code.

Other more elegant Object Oriented solutions would be the Visitor Pattern or the Chain of Responsibility Pattern. The Visitor Pattern would abstract out the logic of who what the favorite from the Cat and into the Visitor implementation. Same with the Chain of Responsibility. Have a chain of CatFeeder objects, and let them decide whether to "handle" the feeding or pass it on down the chain. Either way would be looser coupling and tighter cohesion.

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Is there any reason that you cannot use a normal looping construct with a counter and a test for its position? It isn't like not using the foreach syntax is inelegant by default. If using the foreach construct, then I would agree using the iterator.

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    for( Iterator<Cat> iter = cats.iterator() ; iter.hasNext(); )
    {
        Cat cat = iter.next();
        feedDryFood(cat);
        if(!iter.hasNext())
            alsoFeedTuna(cat);
    }
share|improve this answer

and suppose myCats is sorted

Sort it in descending order of favouritism instead of ascending order, or reverse the list before iterating

for (Cat cat in catsWithFavouriteFirst)
{
    cat.feed(dryFood);
    if (!tunaTin.isEmpty())
    {
        cat.feed(tunaTin.getTunaOut());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Anybody want to explain why they down voted a perfectly reasonable solution? –  JeremyP Nov 8 '10 at 21:20
    
Somebody batched downvoted possibly all the threads. That sucks. Anyway, I upvoted you for the idea of re-sorting the cats. –  Russell Nov 9 '10 at 0:22
    
@Russell: thanks. I noticed there seemed to be rather a lot of down votes of a lot of reasonable answers. –  JeremyP Nov 9 '10 at 9:01

Something very simple you can do that makes it explicit that the last cat is the favorite and should get tuna is to simply get the last cat by index and give it tuna after giving all the cats dry food.

Cat favorite = myCats.get(myCats.size() - 1);
alsoFeedTuna(favorite);

This is fast and just fine if you're using a List that implements RandomAccess such as an ArrayList. If you're using a non-RandomAccess structure such as a LinkedList, this would be slow but you could view the list as a Deque instead and write:

Cat favorite = myCats.getLast();

You do of course need to ensure that myCats isn't empty to do this.

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2  
Why the downvote? –  ColinD Nov 8 '10 at 17:43
    
I didn't downvote, but maybe it was done because myCats().size() could possibly be zero. –  Inshallah Nov 12 '10 at 9:54
    
@Inshallah: That's true, you would need to ensure that myCats isn't empty. –  ColinD Nov 12 '10 at 18:05

I suggest not using a foreach loop and putting the feedTuna method outside the loop.

int i = 0;
for( i = 0; i < cat.length; i++ ){
  feedDryFood(cat[i]);
}
if( cat.length != 0 ){
  feedTuna(cat[i - 1]);
}

This avoids any additional assignments or conditionals inside the loop.

share|improve this answer
Cat cat;

for (cat : myCats) {
  feedDryFood(cat);
}

alsoFeedTuna(cat);
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, good one, even though it's outside the loop. –  Russell Nov 8 '10 at 16:31
7  
-1: doesn't compile at all :) It has really to be declared in the scope of the foreach. The Iterator is your most elegant bet. –  BalusC Nov 8 '10 at 16:32
1  
My bad, foreach doesn't allow cat to be outside its scope. –  fbcocq Nov 8 '10 at 16:40
    
There's a delete link below the answer. –  BalusC Nov 8 '10 at 16:44
2  
I know, we're all learning, might as well keep it here for posterity. –  fbcocq Nov 8 '10 at 16:53

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