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The relevant schema for this database is there are Jobs which have Job Phases which have DailyInfos. I wrote a function that takes the DailyInfoID and returns a bunch of data related to that Daily. The idea is that if I want Job Phase To Date values, I would call the function for every DailyInfo in that JobPhase by using cross apply on a query that returns all the DailyInfoIDs for that JobPhase. This works well on the JobPhase level.

Now when I go to the Job level, the query runs MUCH slower. Let's say there are 5 phases in a job, if I run the Job Phase to Date query 5 times for each Job Phase, it runs in a reasonable amount of time. However if I run the first Job To Date query below, it takes MUCH longer. The second version of the query, which uses a table variable instead of a subquery, takes the correct amount of time (ie the sum of the 5 Job Phase To Date queries). Why does the table variable version take so much less time and # reads than the subquery version?

Version 1 - Duration: 210,225ms CPU: 206,203ms Reads: 38,737,658

SELECT
    di.DailyInfoID,
    DailyCycleTimes.NetHaulCY,
    DailyCycleTimes.PayCY,
    DailyCycleTimes.DigCY,
    DailyCycleTimes.FillCY,

    DailyCycleTimes.DelayMinutes,
    DailyCycleTimes.PumpMinutes,
    DailyCycleTimes.TurnMinutes,
    DailyCycleTimes.SailToMinutes,
    DailyCycleTimes.SailFromMinutes,
    DailyCycleTimes.ConnectMinutes,
    DailyCycleTimes.DisconnectMinutes,
    DailyCycleTimes.DischargeMinutes
FROM
(
    SELECT di.DailyInfoID
    FROM DailyInfo di
    INNER JOIN JobPhase jp ON jp.JobPhaseID = di.JobPhaseID
    INNER JOIN Job j ON j.JobID = jp.JobID
    WHERE j.JobID = @JobID
)di
CROSS APPLY calc.fGetDailyCycleTimes(di.DailyInfoID) DailyCycleTimes

Version 2 - Duration: 9,654 CPU: 9,593 Reads: 2,039,088

DECLARE @DailyInfo table(DailyInfoID int)

INSERT INTO @DailyInfo
SELECT di.DailyInfoID
FROM DailyInfo di
INNER JOIN JobPhase jp ON jp.JobPhaseID = di.JobPhaseID
INNER JOIN Job j ON j.JobID = jp.JobID
WHERE j.JobID = @JobID

SELECT  
    di.DailyInfoID,
    DailyCycleTimes.NetHaulCY,
    DailyCycleTimes.PayCY,
    DailyCycleTimes.DigCY,
    DailyCycleTimes.FillCY,

    DailyCycleTimes.DelayMinutes,
    DailyCycleTimes.PumpMinutes,
    DailyCycleTimes.TurnMinutes,
    DailyCycleTimes.SailToMinutes,
    DailyCycleTimes.SailFromMinutes,
    DailyCycleTimes.ConnectMinutes,
    DailyCycleTimes.DisconnectMinutes,
    DailyCycleTimes.DischargeMinutes
FROM @DailyInfo di
CROSS APPLY calc.fGetDailyCycleTimes(di.DailyInfoID) DailyCycleTimes
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2 Answers 2

Check the actual execution plan for each in Management Studio - that will tell you where the cost is attributed for each.

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The table variable can't be optimized by the query engine, where the underlying table (when used directly) can.

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The underlying table could have an index that might be used - table variables don't have / don't support indices. –  marc_s Nov 8 '10 at 17:21
    
Yep. I think the optimizer also always assumes one row in the table variable when deciding on an execution plan. –  Phil Sandler Nov 8 '10 at 17:24

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