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I am trying (desperately) to get a customer authentication provider working for my WCF service. So far I have the following code;

web.config

      <serviceCredentials>
        <userNameAuthentication userNamePasswordValidationMode="Custom"  customUserNamePasswordValidatorType="MyNamespace.CustomUserNameValidator, MyNamespace" />
      </serviceCredentials>

     <wsHttpBinding>
    <binding name="wsHttpBindingConfig" >
      <security mode="Message">
        <message clientCredentialType="UserName" />
      </security>
    </binding>
  </wsHttpBinding>

      <serviceBehaviors>
    <behavior>
      <serviceMetadata httpGetEnabled="true"/>
      <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="true"/>
    </behavior>
  </serviceBehaviors>

Custom authenticator class;

public class CustomUserNameValidator : UserNamePasswordValidator
{
    public override void Validate(string userName, string password)
    {
        // have security details been provided?
        if (null == userName || null == password)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException();
        }

        // authenticate user
        if (!(userName == "test" && password == "test"))
        {
            // This throws an informative fault to the client.
            throw new FaultException("SecurityFailed");
        }
    }
}

Everything compiles ok, but when I use the WCF test client from visual studio to call a method called Ping (below), the custom authenticator never gets used. The Ping method just executes and any breakpoint I have in my CustomUserNameValidator class.

Why would this be? All help appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

In the line where you have

customUserNamePasswordValidatorType="MyNamespace.CustomUserNameValidator, MyNamespace"

the second part of the type (you currently have "MyNamespace") should be the name of the assembly containing the type, without any file extension.

See this question for more help.

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The same thing in my case. MyNamespace is actually MyCompany.AplicationName.B2B so the assembly is called MyCompany.AplicationName.B2B.dll –  Carl Nov 9 '10 at 14:55

A few suggestions.

  1. The WCFTestClient is not the best application. You would be better off using a tool like SOAPUI (downloadable at www.soapUI.org). The WCFTestClient does not import all configuration settings and is not the best method for testing.
  2. When I use CustomAuthentication I set my binding up like this:

    <wsHttpBinding>  
        <binding name="wsHttpBindingConfig" >  
           <security mode="TransportWithMessageCredentials">  
             <message clientCredentialType="UserName" />  
           </security>  
        </binding>  
    </wsHttpBinding> 
    

I assume you will like some form of security down the line. Testing with a self signed SSL cert on your machine pretty easy. There is more information about how to do this here.

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Matt - TransportWithMessageCredentials is what I was using before, so I will revert to that anyway. SoapUi is also a tool I am using - but I find it a little tempremantal at times. Even using SoapUi I cannot get it to use the custom authentication. Any suggestions? Also - you say "I assume you will like some form of security down the line". Certificates aside. That is what I am trying to implement. The SOAP messages I receive include WS-Security header info with a username and password, it is this I am trying to validate. –  Carl Nov 9 '10 at 9:15
1  
Could you also provide the Full behaviors, endpoint, and client (if you are using one) sections from your web.config? –  Matt Klepeis Nov 9 '10 at 14:29

I've taken all of the information that you've provided and created a template web.config. I would envision it looking something like this.

<system.serviceModel>
   <services>
     <service name="<YourNameSpace>.<ServiceName>" <behaviorConfiguration="<YourNameSpace>.<BehaviorName>">
      <endpoint
        address=""
        binding="wsHttpBinding"
        bindingConfiguration="wsHttpBindingConfig"
        contract="<YourNameSpace>.<ServiceInterface>"
      />
         <!--Notice the binding is mexHttpsBinding, default is http-->
      <endpoint 
        address="mex" 
        binding="mexHttpsBinding" 
        contract="IMetadataExchange" 
      />
     </service>
   </services>
<behaviors>
   <serviceBehaviors>
       <behavior name="<YourNameSpace>.<BehaviorName>">
          <!--Notice the httpsGetEnabled, default is http-->
      <serviceMetadata httpsGetEnabled="true"/>
           <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="false"/>
           <serviceCredentials>
              <userNameAuthentication
                 userNamePasswordValidationMode="Custom"                 
                 customUserNamePasswordValidatorType="<YourNameSpace>.CustomUserNameValidator, <YourNameSpace>"
              />
           </serviceCredentials>
       </behavior>
   </serviceBehaviors>
</behaviors>
<bindings>
  <wsHttpBinding>
    <binding name="wsHttpBindingConfig">
      <security mode="TransportWithMessageCredential">
        <message clientCredentialType="UserName"/>
      </security>
    </binding>
  <wsHttpBinding>
</bindings>

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