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I see a lot of questions and answers re order and sort. Is there anything that sorts vectors or data frames into groupings (like quartiles or deciles)? I have a "manual" solution, but there's likely a better solution that has been group-tested.

Here's my attempt:

> temp <- data.frame(name=letters[1:12], value=rnorm(12), quartile=rep(NA, 12))
> temp
   name       value quartile
1     a  2.55118169       NA
2     b  0.79755259       NA
3     c  0.16918905       NA
4     d  1.73359245       NA
5     e  0.41027113       NA
6     f  0.73012966       NA
7     g -1.35901658       NA
8     h -0.80591167       NA
9     i  0.48966739       NA
10    j  0.88856758       NA
11    k  0.05146856       NA
12    l -0.12310229       NA
> temp.sorted <- temp[order(temp$value), ]
> temp.sorted$quartile <- rep(1:4, each=12/4)
> temp <- temp.sorted[order(as.numeric(rownames(temp.sorted))), ]
> temp
   name       value quartile
1     a  2.55118169        4
2     b  0.79755259        3
3     c  0.16918905        2
4     d  1.73359245        4
5     e  0.41027113        2
6     f  0.73012966        3
7     g -1.35901658        1
8     h -0.80591167        1
9     i  0.48966739        3
10    j  0.88856758        4
11    k  0.05146856        2
12    l -0.12310229        1

Is there a better (cleaner/faster/one-line) approach? Thanks!

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4 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The method I use is:

temp$quartile <- with(temp, cut(value, 
                                breaks=quantile(value, probs=seq(0,1, by=0.25)), 
                                include.lowest=TRUE))

It has the side-effect of labeling the quartiles with the values, which I consider a "good thing", but if it were not "good for you", you could add this line to your code:

temp$quartile <- factor(temp$quartile, levels=c("1","2","3","4") )

Or even quicker but slightly more obscure in how it works, although it is no longer a factor but rather a numeric vector:

temp$quartile <- as.numeric(temp$quartile)
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5  
cut() has argument labels which can be used so you don't need the factor() line - just add labels = 1:4 in the cut() call of your first line. –  Gavin Simpson Nov 8 '10 at 18:02
1  
You also need to handle precision issues using quantile() as the breaks with cut(). All the examples I tried results in one or more NA because the data were slightly bigger/larger than the min/max quantiles returned by quantile() –  Gavin Simpson Nov 8 '10 at 18:04
1  
The Hmisc package also has a cut2 function with a "m" argument that cuts into "m" (roughly) equal sections. –  BondedDust Nov 8 '10 at 18:05
2  
Gavin's point regarding the NA returned is on point and is due to my not including the include.lowest=TRUE argument. I am going to put in in my answer with an edit. –  BondedDust Nov 8 '10 at 18:09
    
seems great minds think alike! I was just looking at ?cut as I knew the eps fudge I was using was a fudge, and saw the 'include.lowest' argument as well. –  Gavin Simpson Nov 8 '10 at 18:21
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You can use the quantile() function, but you need to handle rounding/precision when using cut(). So

set.seed(123)
temp <- data.frame(name=letters[1:12], value=rnorm(12), quartile=rep(NA, 12))
brks <- with(temp, quantile(value, probs = c(0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1)))
temp <- within(temp, quartile <- cut(value, breaks = brks, labels = 1:4, 
                                     include.lowest = TRUE))

Giving:

> head(temp)
  name       value quartile
1    a -0.56047565        1
2    b -0.23017749        2
3    c  1.55870831        4
4    d  0.07050839        2
5    e  0.12928774        3
6    f  1.71506499        4
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Thanks! I knew about quantile, but for some reason I thought it would impose a normal dist on my data. In hindsight, that's a ridiculous thought. And I needed the min and max trick in my test. –  Richard Herron Nov 8 '10 at 18:15
1  
@richardh - actually, you don't. I remembered that cut() has an include.lowest after commenting on Dwin's answer. I have modified my answer accordingly. –  Gavin Simpson Nov 8 '10 at 18:19
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There is possibly a quicker way, but I would do:

a <- rnorm(100) # Our data
q <- quantile(a) # You can supply your own breaks, see ?quantile

# Define a simple function that checks in which quantile a number falls
getQuant <- function(x)
   {
   for (i in 1:(length(q)-1))
       {
       if (x>=q[i] && x<q[i+1])
          break;
       }
   i
   }

# Apply the function to the data
res <- unlist(lapply(as.matrix(a), getQuant))
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temp$quartile <- ceiling(sapply(temp$value,function(x) sum(x-temp$value>=0))/(length(temp$value)/4))
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