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I have the following function which does a crude job of parsing an XML file into a dictionary.

Unfortunately, since Python dictionaries are not ordered, I am unable to cycle through the nodes as I would like.

How do i change this so it outputs an ordered dictionary which reflects the original order of the nodes when looped with 'for'.

def simplexml_load_file(file):
    import collections
    from lxml import etree

    tree = etree.parse(file)
    root = tree.getroot()

    def xml_to_item(el):
        item = None
        if el.text:
            item = el.text
        child_dicts = collections.defaultdict(list)
        for child in el.getchildren():
            child_dicts[child.tag].append(xml_to_item(child))
        return dict(child_dicts) or item

    def xml_to_dict(el):
        return {el.tag: xml_to_item(el)}

    return xml_to_dict(root)

x = simplexml_load_file('routines/test.xml')

print x

for y in x['root']:
    print y

outputs...

{'root': {
    'a': ['1'], 
    'aa': [{'b': [{'c': ['2']}, '2']}], 
    'aaaa': [{'bb': ['4']}], 
    'aaa': ['3'], 
    'aaaaa': ['5']
}}

a
aa
aaaa
aaa
aaaaa

how can i implement collections.OrderedDict so that i can be sure of getting the correct order of the nodes.

xml for reference...

<root>
    <a>1</a>
    <aa>
        <b>
            <c>2</c>
        </b>
        <b>2</b>
    </aa>
    <aaa>3</aaa>
    <aaaa>
        <bb>4</bb>
    </aaaa>
    <aaaaa>5</aaaaa>
</root>
share|improve this question
    
duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/4123266/… by same author. –  Steven Rumbalski Nov 8 '10 at 17:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You could use the new OrderedDict dict subclass which was added to the standard library's collections module in version 2.7*. Actually what you need is an Ordered+defaultdict combination which doesn't exist -- but it's possible to create one by subclassing OrderedDict as illustrated below:

import collections

class OrderedDefaultdict(collections.OrderedDict):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        if not args:
            self.default_factory = None
        else:
            if not (args[0] is None or callable(args[0])):
                raise TypeError('first argument must be callable or None')
            self.default_factory = args[0]
            args = args[1:]
        super(OrderedDefaultdict, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

    def __missing__ (self, key):
        if self.default_factory is None:
            raise KeyError(key)
        self[key] = default = self.default_factory()
        return default

    def __reduce__(self):  # optional, for pickle support
        args = (self.default_factory,) if self.default_factory else ()
        return self.__class__, args, None, None, self.iteritems()

def simplexml_load_file(file):
    from lxml import etree

    tree = etree.parse(file)
    root = tree.getroot()

    def xml_to_item(el):
        item = el.text or None
        child_dicts = OrderedDefaultdict(list)
        for child in el.getchildren():
            child_dicts[child.tag].append(xml_to_item(child))
        return collections.OrderedDict(child_dicts) or item

    def xml_to_dict(el):
        return {el.tag: xml_to_item(el)}

    return xml_to_dict(root)

x = simplexml_load_file('routines/test.xml')

print x

for y in x['root']:
    print y

The output produced is this from your test xml file...

{'root': 
    OrderedDict(
        [('a', ['1']), 
         ('aa', [OrderedDict([('b', [OrderedDict([('c', ['2'])]), '2'])])]), 
         ('aaa', ['3']), 
         ('aaaa', [OrderedDict([('bb', ['4'])])]), 
         ('aaaaa', ['5'])
        ]
    )
}

a
aa
aaa
aaaa
aaaaa

Which I think is close to what you want.

*If your version of Python doesn't have OrderedDict, which was introduced in v2.5 you may be able use Raymond Hettinger's Ordered Dictionary for Py2.4 ActiveState recipe as a base class instead.

Minor update:

Added a __reduce__() method which will allow the instances of the class to be pickled and unpickled properly. This wasn't necessary for this question, but came up in similar one.

share|improve this answer
    
@Neil G: Nice catch. Too many years of C programming... ;-) –  martineau Dec 9 '11 at 21:24
    
happens to me too all the time :) –  Neil G Dec 10 '11 at 0:12

There are many possible implementation of OrderedDict listed in the answer here: How do you retrieve items from a dictionary in the order that they're inserted?

You can create your own OrderedDict module for use in your own code by copying one of the implementations. I assume you do not have access to the OrderedDict because of the version of Python you are running.

One interesting aspect of your question is the possible need for defaultdict functionality. If you need this, you can implement the __missing__ method to get the desired effect.

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