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I'm doing some basic sql on a few tables I have, using a union(rightly or wrongly)

but I need remove the duplicates. Any ideas?

select * from calls
left join users a on calls.assigned_to= a.user_id
where a.dept = 4 
union
select * from calls
left join users r on calls.requestor_id= r.user_id
where r.dept = 4
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Are you saying that your query does not remove duplicates? –  Yada Nov 8 '10 at 20:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 35 down vote accepted

Union will remove duplicates. Union All does not.

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1  
this is true, at least for MS SQL. –  Taras B Nov 8 '10 at 20:26
1  
Interesting...doesn't remove the duplicates on the above statement –  thegunner Nov 8 '10 at 20:31
    
@thegunner - Do you happen to have a Timestamp data type as one of your columns? –  Randy Minder Nov 8 '10 at 20:33
1  
@thegunner - Union does in fact remove duplicates. I would remove the selct * from both queries and manually add columns one at a time, to both, until you find a case where you think a duplicate occurs. When you find one, what is the data type? –  Randy Minder Nov 8 '10 at 20:34
    
Hi, theres no timstamp. I'm just getting two duplicate rows –  thegunner Nov 8 '10 at 20:37

Others have already answered your direct question, but perhaps you could simplify the query to eliminate the question (or have I missed something, and a query like the following will really produce substantially different results?):

select * 
    from calls c join users u
        on c.assigned_to = u.user_id 
        or c.requestor_id = u.user_id
    where u.dept = 4
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Using UNION automatically removes duplicate rows unless you specify UNION ALL: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms180026(SQL.90).aspx

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If you are using T-SQL then it appears from previous posts that UNION removes duplicates. But if you are not, you could use distinct. This doesn't quite feel right to me either but it could get you the result you are looking for

SELECT DISTINCT *
FROM
(
select * from calls
left join users a on calls.assigned_to= a.user_id
where a.dept = 4 
union
select * from calls
left join users r on calls.requestor_id= r.user_id
where r.dept = 4
)a
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Since you are still getting duplicate using only UNION I would check that:

  • That they are exact duplicates. I mean, if you make a

    SELECT DISTINCT * FROM (<your query>) AS subquery

    you do get fewer files?

  • That you don't have already the duplicates in the first part of the query (maybe generated by the left join). As I understand it UNION it will not add to the result set rows that are already on it, but it won't remove duplicates already present in the first data set.

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At least T-SQL removes all duplicates, even if they are coming from the same data set. –  Carlos May 13 at 10:12

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