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Is there any option to gain counted combinations of all elements in one SQL query, without using temp tables or procedures?

Consider these three tables:

  • products (id, product_name)

  • transactions (id, date)

  • transaction_has_product (id, product_id, transaction_id)

Sample data

  • products

    1   AAA
    2   BBB
    3   CCC
    
  • transactions

    1   some_date
    2   some_date
    
  • transaction_has_products

    1   1   1
    2   2   1
    3   3   1
    4   1   2
    5   2   2
    

Result should be:

AAA, BBB = 2   
AAA, CCC = 1   
BBB, CCC = 1   
AAA, BBB, CCC = 1
share|improve this question
    
it was just an example, fixed –  objah Nov 8 '10 at 20:33
    
It helps to have accurate data to work with...thanks for fixing. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 8 '10 at 20:39

3 Answers 3

Not easily because you have different numbers of matched products in the last row compared with the other rows. You might be able to do it with some sort of GROUP_CONCAT() operator (available in MySQL; implementable in other DBMS, such as Informix and probably PostgreSQL), but I'm not confident of that.

Pairwise Matching

SELECT p1.product_name AS name1, p2.product_name AS name2, COUNT(*)
  FROM (SELECT p.product_name, h.transaction_id
          FROM products AS p
          JOIN transactions_has_products AS h ON h.product_id = p.product_id
       ) AS p1
  JOIN (SELECT p.product_name, h.transaction_id
          FROM products AS p
          JOIN transactions_has_products AS h ON h.product_id = p.product_id
       ) AS p2
    ON p1.transaction_id = p2.transaction_id
   AND p1.product_name   < p2.product_name
 GROUP BY p1.name, p2.name;

Handling the triple match is non-trivial; extending it further than that is definitely rather difficult.

share|improve this answer
    
at the end, should be also "group by p1.product_name, p2.product_name", thanks –  objah Nov 8 '10 at 20:46
    
@objah - brain death - you're so right! –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 8 '10 at 20:58

If you know what all the products will be up front, you could do it by pivoting the data like this.

If you don't know what the products will be up front, you could build this query dynamically in a stored procedure. The practicality of either approach would break down if the number of products is large, but I think that would probably be true no matter how this requirement is accomplished.

select
    product_combination, 
    case product_combination
        when 'AAA, BBB' then aaa_bbb
        when 'AAA, CCC' then aaa_ccc
        when 'BBB, CCC' then bbb_ccc
        when 'AAA, BBB, CCC' then aaa_bbb_ccc
    end as number_of_transactions
from
(
    select 'AAA, BBB' as product_combination union all
    select 'AAA, CCC' union all
    select 'BBB, CCC' union all
    select 'AAA, BBB, CCC'
) as combination_list
cross join
(
    select
        sum(case when aaa = 1 and bbb = 1 then 1 else 0 end) as aaa_bbb,
        sum(case when aaa = 1 and ccc = 1 then 1 else 0 end) as aaa_ccc,
        sum(case when bbb = 1 and ccc = 1 then 1 else 0 end) as bbb_ccc,
        sum(case when aaa = 1 and bbb = 1 and ccc = 1 then 1 else 0 end) as aaa_bbb_ccc
    from
    (
        select
            count(case when a.product_name = 'AAA' then 1 else null end) as aaa,
            count(case when a.product_name = 'BBB' then 1 else null end) as bbb,
            count(case when a.product_name = 'CCC' then 1 else null end) as ccc,
            b.transaction_id
        from
            products a
        inner join
            transaction_has_products b
        on
            a.id = b.product_id
        group by
            b.transaction_id
    ) as product_matrix
) as combination_counts

Result:

product_combination  number_of_transactions
AAA, BBB             2
AAA, CCC             1
BBB, CCC             1
AAA, BBB, CCC        1

share|improve this answer

Depending on how much control you have on the query you could do (this is TSQL might have to change for postgresql)

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM transactions t WHERE
(
     SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT tp.product) 
     FROM transaction_has_products tp 
     WHERE tp.[transaction_id] = t.id and tp.product IN (1, 2, 3)
) = 3

where (1,2,3) is the list of ID's you want to check for and the = 3 equals the amount of entries in the list.

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