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Is there a way to provide a default type for a parameter T of a generic, something like:

class Something<T = string>
{
}

I know there aren't many strong reasons for this, but I would like to hint the code client which type he should be preferably using.

Another thing, can I restrict the generic type to a ValueType? I've just seen that you can't, but still, I'd like to know why. Anyone has a clue?

Thanks!

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This is not possible by default. –  Vercas Nov 8 '10 at 20:54
1  
Why are you saying you can't restrict a generic type to a value type when nearly every answer here demonstrates just how it's done? (Not via ValueType, but by using the struct keyword.) –  stakx Nov 8 '10 at 21:13
    
@stakx I said by default. (Like he tried to - by "default"ing the value.) –  Vercas Nov 8 '10 at 21:29
    
@Vercas, sorry for the misunderstanding, my comment was directed at the OP, not at your comment. –  stakx Nov 8 '10 at 22:36
    
@stakx Oh, okay. By the way, Bruno, if my answer was good, why don't you click the accept icon? (the checkmark) –  Vercas Nov 9 '10 at 19:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Ok, I suppose you have the class:

class Something<T>
{

}

Now, you might want another class:

class Something : Something<string>
{
    // NO MORE CODE NEEDED HERE!
}

This is the only and the best way.
So if one uses Something he will actually use Something<string>.

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2  
This works (fsvo "works", not that I would recommend it generally) because Something and Something<'> (and Something<','> is different still) are two different classes (imagine the case of system.collections.IEnumerable and systems.collections.generic.IEnumerable<T> -- this differs from Java where there is essentially only one "collapsed" type allowed). On the other hand, now you have two different types :-) –  user166390 Nov 8 '10 at 21:04
    
Another alternative may be: using Something = foo.Something<String>; However the using construct is only available in a few cases (before classes or at top of an outer class before members, etc.) and isn't externally exposed as an type/alias. –  user166390 Nov 8 '10 at 21:12
    
@pst I'd use that instead of what I posted, but I thought he might need that way more. –  Vercas Nov 8 '10 at 21:28

You can use the where keyword to constrain the specific types that can be used as type parameters.

For example, you could your class to only accept generic type parameters where the type implements the IComparable interface:

class Something<T> where T : IComparable
{
}

Or, as you mentioned, you can constrain T to be a value type by using where T : struct:

class Something<T> where T : struct
{
}

See MSDN's article on Constraints on Type Parameters for more info. Hope this helps!

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I don't believe there is a way to default it to a certain type, but you could put that as a comment in the XML docs. As far as restricting to a value type, you can obtain this behavior by declaring your generic as follows:

class MyGeneric<T> where T : struct
{
    ...
}
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And +1 for answering the 2nd question :p –  user166390 Nov 8 '10 at 21:08
1  
If you want strings, you might need where T : class because System.String is a class. –  Vercas Nov 8 '10 at 21:31
    
@Vercas - correct or you will get the error: The type 'string' must be a non-nullable value type in order to use it as parameter 'T' in the generic type or method 'Something<T>' –  atconway Jan 28 '13 at 14:59

According to the docs you can constrain T to be a value type using the where keyword

where T: struct

Class declaration would then look like this:

class Something<T> where T: struct {
  ...
} 

Though string is not a value type and you won't be able to use it with such a constraint. Maybe IComparable would be better in case you want to also use the string type.

As for specifying the default type, I don't believe it is possible.

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class Something<T> where T : string
{
}; // eo class Something<>
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You cannot inherit from string thus the only option would be to declare var s = new Something<string>;. Everything else will turn into an error. –  Vercas Nov 8 '10 at 21:30

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