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Can I redefine a C++ macro then define it back?

Say I have some code that uses the name BLAH for a variable. Suppose BLAH is a common preprocessor definition in many standard header files (defined as 10), so if my file is included after any of them, the code breaks because BLAH is transformed into 10; therefore, I must #undef BLAH. But also other headers may depend on BLAH, so I must restore BLAH to it's original value after my header is done. Is it possible to do something like this:

#ifdef BLAH
#define BLAH_OLD BLAH
#undef BLAH
#endif

... code ...

// restore BLAH to 10
#ifdef BLAH_OLD
#define BLAH BLAH_OLD
#end

? This doesn't work of course, because BLAH is not expanded to 10. I have tried doing something like

#define EXPAND_AGAIN(x) x
#define EXPAND(x) EXPAND_AGAIN(x)
#define BLAH_OLD EXPAND(BLAH)

but that doesn't work either, since EXPAND is taken literally and not expanded. I am using MSVC 2008/2010, but it would be lovely if the solution would work on most other compilers too.

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marked as duplicate by NullUserException Mar 29 '12 at 15:12

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3  
Have you considered changing your variable naming? –  Paul Sonier Nov 8 '10 at 21:18
    
Change the name of your variable; terrible convention you've got going on there if this is a problem. And how about instead of "let's say" you say "here's the actual problem I'm trying to solve." –  GManNickG Nov 8 '10 at 21:34
1  
You do realize the it has been a convention from nearly the beginning of time that identifiers that are all caps are reserved for use by the pre-processor (to avoid things like this). –  Loki Astari Nov 8 '10 at 21:49
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4 Answers

Yes, given that your compiler supports the push/pop macro directives (visual c++, gcc, llvm all do):

#define BLAH 10

#pragma push_macro("BLAH")
#undef BLAH

#define BLAH 5

...

#pragma pop_macro("BLAH")
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This seems to be Microsoft compiler specific. –  user405725 Nov 8 '10 at 21:45
    
Sorry, standard C++ does not define push_macro (Visual C++ has this #pragma, but it's not standard C++). Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 8 '10 at 21:47
    
At least some versions of GCC also support it. –  Steve Fallows Nov 8 '10 at 21:47
    
I've just edited my comment to address that, latest gcc/llvm support it as well, not sure when was it added to gcc though. –  yonilevy Nov 8 '10 at 21:48
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Unfortunately the preprocessor doesn't support a stack of definitions.

The Boost preprocessor library makes the preprocessor do things you'd never imagine it could do (like effectively variadic macros in C++98), but is bound by the inherent limitations of the preprocessor -- so, no can do, sorry.

The only known half-way remedy is to reserve ALL_UPPERCASE_IDENTIFIERS for macros, and consistently always use them for macros. It reduces the name collision problem somewhat. Unfortunately the C standard library defines a number of lowercase macros, or allows for their existence, like e.g. assert, but they are just a few.

From a practical point of view the main problem is in Windows programming, where Microsoft's [windows.h] header defines zillions of non-uppercase macros, including, by default, min and max which conflict with the C++ standard library.

So, for Windows C++ programming, always define NOMINMAX before including [windows.h].

Cheers & hth.,

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I used to believe that the very same trick you tried does work, as I used to use it myself. But I eventually learned that it actually does not work at all. The simple answer is NO, you cannot save a define's current value, change it, and then restore the old value. The preprocessor simply does not work that way. Once you define a new value, the old value is gone.

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One trick that works for me is to use an enum in the class.

class foo
{
public:
  enum { blah = 10 } myenum;
}

Then you can just use

foo:blah

when you need '10'.

Since it's part of the class then other uses of 'blah' won't conflict and you save all that def'ing and undef'ing.

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What? #define blah 0, breaks your code. –  GManNickG Nov 8 '10 at 21:38
    
-1 for Advice That Generally Does Not Work. If "blah" is already defined as a preprocessor macro, the enum definition will most probably be syntactically ill-formed. The only possibility of passing is when "blah" is defined as a valid identifier. Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 8 '10 at 21:39
    
replace the macro with the enum and all the issues of dealing with macro collisions go away. It won't fix 'pushing' a value. –  Jay Nov 9 '10 at 14:52
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