Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm reading a book called JavaScript patterns but there's one part where I think the guy is confusing.

The guy actually led up in the book to the klass design pattern, where he developed it piece by piece. He first he presents the problem:

function inherit(C, P) {
C.prototype = P.prototype;
}

He says:

"This gives you short and fast prototype chain lookups because all objects actually share the same prototype. But that’s also a DRAWBACK because if one child or grandchild somewhere down the inheritance chain MODIFIES the prototype, it AFFECTS all parents and grandparents."

However, I actually tried to modify the prototype say() in Child and it had no affect on Parent and in fact Child still pointed to Parent and completely ignored its own prototype of same name, which makes sense since it's pointing to a different memory position. So how can the guy says something like that? Below proves my point:

function Parent(){}

Parent.prototype.say = function () {
return 20;
};

function Child(){
}

Child.prototype.say = function () {
return 10;
};

inherit(Child, Parent);

function inherit(C, P) {
C.prototype = P.prototype;
 } 

 var parent = new Parent();
var child = new Child();


var child2 = new Child()
alert(child.say(); //20
alert(parent.say()); //20
alert(child2.say()); //20

It's impossible for any child or grandchild to modify the prototype!

This leads to my second point. He says the solution to the problem of the possibility of accidentially modifying parent prototypes down inheritance chain (which I can't reproduce) is to break the direct link between parent’s and child’s prototype while at the same time benefiting from the prototype chain. He offers the following as a solution:

function inherit(C, P) {
var F = function () {};
F.prototype = P.prototype;
C.prototype = new F();
}

The problem is this outputs the same exact values as the other pattern:

function Parent(){}

Parent.prototype.say = function () {
return 20;
};

function Child(){
}

 Child.prototype.say = function () {
return 10;
};

inherit(Child, Parent);

function inherit(C, P) {
var F = function () {};
F.prototype = P.prototype;
C.prototype = new F();
}

var parent = new Parent();
var child = new Child();


var child2 = new Child()
alert(child.say(); //20
alert(parent.say()); //20
alert(child2.say()); //20

It doesn't make sense that an empty function somehow breaks a link. In fact, the Child points to F and F in turn points to the Parent's prototype. So they are ALL still pointing to the same memory position. This is demonstrated above, where it outputs the same exact values as the first example. I have no clue what this author is trying to demonstrate and why he makes claims that don't gel for me and that I can't reproduce.

Thanks for response.

share|improve this question
    
Nice question, I think have a complete answer now :] –  Harmen Nov 8 '10 at 21:49
    
For completeness, the inherit function should reset the constructor property on C.prototype. C.prototype.constructor = C;. If you test it as is, you'll see that it's pointing to P. That would cause problems trying to call the constructor from the object itself. I have a post that tells you more than you need to know about how to setup inheritance. js-bits.blogspot.com/2010/08/… –  Juan Mendes Dec 14 '10 at 19:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

For you first point:

What this guy is trying to say, is that the methods for both child and parent will change if you modify the prototype after you created instances.

For example:

function inherit(C, P) {
  C.prototype = P.prototype;
} 

function Parent(){}
function Child(){}

inherit(Child, Parent);

Parent.prototype.say = function () {
  return 20;
};

var parent = new Parent();
var child = new Child();


// will alert 20, while the method was set on the parent.
alert( child.say() );

The same thing happens when you change the child's constructor (which is shared with the parent).

// same thing happens here, 
Child.prototype.speak = function() {
  return 40;
};

// will alert 40, while the method was set on the child
alert( parent.speak() );

And about your second point:

function inherit(C, P) {
  var F = function () {};
  F.prototype = P.prototype;
  C.prototype = new F();
}

The new inheriting function will actually separate the constructor of the parent from the child, because it's not pointing to the same object anymore, but now it's pointing to a prototype of a newly created function that has nothing to do with the parent. So, you actually create a local copy of the parent's constructor, and then create a new instance of the copy, which returns all constructor methods an properties. By changing the constructor of the child now, it will not affect the parent.

function inherit(C, P) {
  var F = function () {};
  F.prototype = P.prototype;
  C.prototype = new F();
}

function Parent(){}
function Child(){}

inherit(Child, Parent);

// same thing happens here, 
Child.prototype.speak = function() {
  return 40;
};

var parent = new Parent();

// will throw an error, because speak is undefined
alert( parent.speak() );
share|improve this answer
    
Can you briefly clarify "has nothing to do with the parent" when indeed we assign a reference of P prototype to F prototype. So F prototype must be pointing to P's prototype. When we instantiate F, it contains you say a copy, but not a reference? apply() creates copies but object assignment creates references so when assigning prototype, isn't a refeence, not a copy, created from P to F? And if it's a reference, then that link from C to F to P should still exist. But obviously, it doesn't because your code works. –  JohnMerlino Nov 8 '10 at 22:45

The fact that you can change prototype object by pointing another prototype to it is normal JavaScript behavior. JavaScript's primitive values are immutable but objects and arrays aren't. I'll explain it with simple example:

var person = {name: 'greg', age: 20};

>>>person.name; //prints 'greg'

>>>person.age; //prints 20

var a = person;

>>>a.name; //prints 'greg'

a.name = 'peter';

>>>a.name; //prints 'peter'

>>>person.name; //prints 'peter'

//I've changed person.name through a.name. That's why objects in JavaScript are called mutable

Arrays have the same behavior:

var arr = ['first', 'second', 'third'],
    newArr = arr;

newArr.pop();

>>>newArr; //prints ['first', 'second']

>>>arr; //prints ['first', 'second']

//Frist array was also changed

Let's look at strings numbers and booleans(primitive data types):

var str = 'hello world',

    newStr = str;

>>>str; //prints 'hello world'

>>>newStr; //prints 'hello world'

>>>newStr.toUpperCase(); //prints 'HELLO WORLD'

>>>str; //prints 'hello world'

>>newStr; //prints 'hello world'

//Numbers and booleans have similiar behavior

I had the same issue but i fixed it. Look, i've commented your code, some hints in it should help you:

function Parent(){}

Parent.prototype.say = function () {
return 20;
};

function Child(){
}



/**
*
* The area you should examine i've selected below.
*
*/

//Start BUG

//new say method will not affect the Parent.prototype beacuse it wasn't assigned yet
Child.prototype.say = function () {
return 10;
};

//rewrite Child.prototype and all it's methods with Parent.prototype
inherit(Child, Parent);

//End BUG



function inherit(C, P) {
C.prototype = P.prototype;
 } 

var parent = new Parent();
var child = new Child();


var child2 = new Child()
alert(child.say(); //20
alert(parent.say()); //20
alert(child2.say()); //20

The problem here is, that instead of copying and changing the Parent.prototype you creating new Child.prototype.say method and right after it you rewriting the whole Child.prototype object through Parent.prototype assignment. Just change their order and it should work fine.

share|improve this answer

If you change the prototype after inheriting it, you see it change the prototype for the parent also:

function Parent(){}

Parent.prototype.say = function () {
return 20;
};

function Child(){
}

inherit(Child, Parent);

Child.prototype.say = function () {
return 10;
};

function inherit(C, P) {
C.prototype = P.prototype;
 } 

 var parent = new Parent();
var child = new Child();


var child2 = new Child()
alert(child.say()); //10
alert(parent.say()); //10
alert(child2.say()); //10

If you use the modifed version of the inherit function, the Child and Parent prototypes remain separate.

share|improve this answer

Creating a function

function MyConstructor() {}
    - MyConstructor = function(){}
    - MyConstructor.__proto__ = Function.prototype
    - MyConstructor.prototype = {}

        * This object will "not" have all properties defined in the constructor. Constructor is a function, thats it. The constructor function will not be run till a "new" operator is encountered.
        * This is the object that will be assigned to <all objects of this class>.__proto__. So adding anything to it will also add the same functionality to all objects.
    - MyConstructor.prototype.__proto__ = Object.prototype (internally {}.__proto__ = Object.prototype)
    - MyConstructor.prototype.constructor = MyConstructor
        * whenever the prototype property is created, automatically constructor property is created which points back to the function.

Creating an object

var myobject = new MyConstructor();
    - myobject = {} // object is type of MyConstructor
    - myobject.__proto__ = MyConstructor.prototype (this property can only be set at the time on object creation)
    * Executes the constructor function, using the newly created object (myobject) whenever "this" is mentioned.
    - myObject.constructor = MyConstructor;

Using instanceOf

myobject instanceof MyConstructor  // true
    - checks the prototype property of the MyConstructor and checks it agains the {Prototype} chain of the myobject. Since myobject.__proto__ = MyConstructor.prototype, hence it will return true.

Remember:

  • Object.prototype.constructor = Object (class/function/object)
  • Function.prototype.__proto__ = Object.prototype
  • Constructors have their own {Prototype} chain completely separate from the prototype chain of objects they initialize.
  • Any user-defined function in javascript automatically gets a prototype property which in turn has a constructor property that refers back to the function.
  • Any user-defined function in javascript can be called as a constructor by prepending new to the call. This will pass a new "this" object to the function and its {Prototype} property will be set to the prototype property of the function.

Example:

function MyConstructor() {}
var myobject = new MyConstructor();
MyConstructor.prototype = {}; // this line breaks the prototype chain.

console.log(myobject instanceof MyConstructor); // prints "false". Why? See below.

  • instanceof always Checks the prototype chain of myobject.
  • myobject.__proto__ points to old MyConstructor.prototype object.
  • Old MyConstructor.prototype has __proto__ pointing to Object.prototype.
  • So anywhere in the prototype chain of myobject, MyConstructor has not come. Hence false.

console.log(myobject.constructor == MyConstructor) // prints "true"

  • myobject.__proto__ points to old MyConstructor.prototype object.
  • Old MyConstructor.prototype.constructor points to MyConstructor.
  • hence myobject.constructor will be pointing to MyConstructor.

console.log(myobject instanceof Object); //prints "true"

  • myobject.__proto__ points to old MyConstructor.prototype object.
  • old MyConstructor.prototype.__proto__ = Object.prototype
  • hence myObject prototype chain has Object in its list

To implement inheritance

To implement classical inheritance, you have to leverage the prototype chains. Since properties and methods are searched on an object's __proto__, if you want it to inherit from another object you have to modify the prototype of its class (you can't modify __proto__).

1   function Animal(){
2       this.alive = true;
3   }
4   function Dog(){
5       this.legs = 4;
6       this.hasTail = true;
7   }
8   Dog.prototype = new Animal();
9   var tommy = new Dog();

Line 1-3

    - Animal = function()
    - Animal.__proto__ = Function.prototype
    - Animal.prototype = {} // type of Object
    - Animal.prototype.__proto__ = Object.prototype
    - Animal.prototype.constructor = Animal

Line 4-7

    - Dog = function()
    - Dog.__proto__ = Function.prototype
    - Dog.prototype = {} // type of Object
    - Dog.prototype.__proto__ = Object.prototype
    - Dog.prototype.constructor = Dog

Line 8

    - Dog.prototype = {} // object of type Animal
    - Dog.prototype.__proto__ = Animal.prototype
        * Now if you add any property to Animal.prototype, then Animal and Dog objects will also get access to that property.
        * very important line. This only does inheritance. But since we can't directly assign __proto__, we have to use "new" operator.
            - what if browser allows us to directly execute the above line instead of Line 8?

                * this will also create the inheritance properly but the below step where constructor function of Animal() is run with Dog.prototype replacing keyword "this" in all places will not run (which happens automatically when new keyword is used). Hence Dog.prototype will not get properties already defined in Animal constructor function.

                * Although any new property that we are going to add to Animal.prototype will be visible to all instances of Animal and Dogs. So to get values already defined inside Animal class, we need to use new keyword so that the constructor function is run and copies the values (like isalive which is statically defined inside the constructor function Animal() to child class's Dog.prototype).

                * Note that the statically defined properties of base class (E.g. isalive) are "copied" to child class (Dog.prototype) and not referred to. So all child classes have a seperate instance of those statically defined properties (like isalive) inside each child class prototype property. Only the new properties that you are going to define in Animal.prototype will be shared among the child Objects since all child class prototype property refer to the same object Animal.prototype. But the base class's statically defined properties will be copied to the child class "prototype" property.

                * Also note that running such a line and directly manipulating the __proto__ property is not recommended/allowed in most browsers.

                # So we can conclude that Animal.prototype can be used to enhance behaviour of Animal class so that all objects will get value of it.
                # Using the new Keyword is the recommended way of creating inheritance and creating objects in Javascript.
        * Since "new" operator is encountered, we have to run the constructor function Animal() with Dog.prototype replacing keyword "this" in all places. So all properties of Animal are copied onto Dog.prototype.
    - Dog.prototype.alive = true;
        * notice Animal.prototype doesn't have any properties like alive, etc.
            E.g. Animal.prototype.alive === undefined   // true
        * Also note that the alive property is copied to the Dog.prototype and not referred (and hence not shared) to as would be a property which will be added to Animal.prototype in future (which will be shared).
    - Dog.prototype will also have a property "constructor" since __proto__ refers to Animal.prototype and Animal.prototype.constructor = Animal
        * notice after execution of line 4-7, Dog.prototype.constructor = Dog, but after line 8, because of using new keyword, Dog.prototype.constructor = Animal.
        * So to avoid this kind of consufion, we should write one more line after line 7, Dog.prototype.constructor = Dog;, to correct the behaviour, else the objects of Dog like tommy will still be of type Animal (based on tommy.constructor).
        * Another trick we can use is to put the following line instead of line 8, Dog.prototype.__proto__ = Animal.prototype. This approach has been covered above. But the assumption is that Animal shouldn't have any statically defined properties, else they won't be copied (since we didn't use the "new" keyword).

Line 9

    - tommy = {} // type of Dog
    - tommy.__proto__ = Dog.prototype (which is an object of type Animal {"alive":true})
        * remember statically defined property "alive" was copied to Dog.prototype

    * since Dog.prototype has "alive" and tommy.__proto__ refers to Dog.prototype, tommy will also have "alive"
    - tommy.__proto__.alive = true
    - hence tommy.alive = true;
        * Now if you do tommy.alive = false; then it will only change tommy.alive to false. tommy.__proto__.alive will still be true!!!!! Cool na! So Dog.prototype is shared among all objects of Dog.

    * Executes the constructor function, using the newly created object (tommy) whenever "this" is mentioned.
    - tommy.legs = 4;
    - tommy.hasTail = true;
    - tommy.constructor = Animal
        * since tommy.__proto__ refers to Dog.prototype whose property __proto__ refers to Animal.prototype which has constructor property.

Now if you execute following line

Animal.prototype.hasHair = true;

then tommy.__proto__ refers to Dog.prototype. Since "hasHair" not found in Dog.prototype so we will find it in Dog.prototype.__proto__ which refers to Animal.prototype which has it. So, tommy.hasHair will be true.

{}

  • {} creates an object.
  • {}.__proto__ === Object.prototype
  • {}.constructor === Object
share|improve this answer
    
I think that creating a instance of Parent (Animal) to be used as prototype of Child (Dog) shows a lack of understanding of prototype is and what it is used for. You now have instance specific members of Animal on Dog.prototype (shared). You don't re use parent constructor (Animal.call(this,...) in Dog) So when you cahnge isAlive to isAlive : {val:true} then create a couple of dogs and kill one lassy.isAlive.val=false you just killed all of them. More info can be found here: stackoverflow.com/a/16063711/1641941 –  HMR Mar 30 at 1:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.