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I am getting a social security number (SSN) from a data warehouse. While posting it to a CRM I want it to be formatted like XXX-XX-XXXX instead of XXXXXXXXX.

It's like converting a simple string with dashes at positions 4 and 7. I am pretty new to C#, so what is the best way to do this?

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BTW the ultimate C# formatting page is blog.stevex.net/string-formatting-in-csharp –  Peter M Nov 8 '10 at 22:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Check out the String.Insert method.

string formattedSSN = unformattedSSN.Insert(5, "-").Insert(3, "-");
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Tricky. It is interesting to note that the "obvious" answer of doing it like this (note my reversal of 3 and 5 compared to yours): unformattedSSN.Insert(3,"-").Insert(5,"-"); would yield 123-4-56789 rather than 123-45-6789. So, you are, in effect inserting dashes from back to front. –  wageoghe Nov 8 '10 at 21:51
    
Yeah, you could do it forwards instead of backwards, but then you'd have to account for the extra dash that you inserted. –  GendoIkari Nov 8 '10 at 21:53
    
Why was this downvoted a month and a half after it was accepted? –  GendoIkari Dec 23 '10 at 23:19
1  
@Gendolkari This is a fine example of a situation where a fluent interface is poor. As you have acknowledged, George's solution is clearer and easier to verify. –  David Heffernan Jan 12 '11 at 20:24
    
George's solution fails when the SSN is stored as a string, which is specified in the question. –  mdelvecchio Jul 4 at 19:40

For a simple, short, and self commenting solution, try:

String.Format("{0:000-00-0000}", 123456789) 

123456789 representing your SSN variable.

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You have an extra # in the middle. Other than that, +1 because it's much more elegant than my solution. –  GendoIkari Nov 8 '10 at 21:35
3  
Close, but you need "{0:000-00-0000}" instead of '#' to allow for leading zeroes (or "{0:00#-##-####}" etc.). –  tnyfst Nov 8 '10 at 21:50
3  
You are assuming that the data is coming in a numeric form. I am not sure how SSN data is typically kept but I would have expected a 9 character string rather than a numerical value given the specification for the first 3 chars includes leading zeroes. If the former then you would need to add in a string->numeric conversion (or is there an implicit one?). –  Peter M Nov 8 '10 at 22:22
1  
Looks like someone's getting a "populist" badge. –  GendoIkari Nov 8 '10 at 22:40
1  
This does not seem to work if your SSN is stored as a string... –  Serj Sagan Dec 26 '13 at 17:49
string ssn = "123456789";

string formattedSSN = string.Join("-", 
                                  ssn.Substring(0,3), 
                                  ssn.Substring(4,2), 
                                  ssn.Substring(6,4));

@George's option is probably cleaner if the SSN is stored as a numeric rather than as a string.

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Without data validation and assuming that you only get 9 character string, I would go with something like this -

return s.Substring(0, 3) + "-" + s.Substring(3, 2) + "-" + s.Substring(5, 4);

But...I am also pretty new...so GendoIkari's answer is soo much better.

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