Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is wrong with rs definition in first where section?

palindrome :: [a] -> [a]

palindrome xs = con xs rs
    where con a b = rev (rev a []) b
        rs = rev xs                        -- here
        where rev [] rs = rs
            rev (x:xs) rs = rev xs (x:rs)

I'm just learning Haskell but its syntax rules confuse me. The error message is

[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( pelindrome.hs, interpreted )

pelindrome.hs:5:8: parse error on input `rs'
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Your indentation was wrong and i think you can only have one where in there (i could be very well wrong. I'm not a haskell guy). There was also a argument missing for the call to rev (an empty list):

palindrome :: [a] -> [a]
palindrome xs = con xs rs
    where con a b = rev (rev a []) b
          rs = rev xs []                       -- here
          rev [] rs = rs
          rev (x:xs) rs = rev xs (x:rs)

main = print (palindrome "hello")

Prints out:

"helloolleh"

I'm going to try to understand it now. Anyway, have fun!

Edit: Makes perfect sense to me now. I think that's the right version. For Haskell indentation rules, read Haskell Indentation

share|improve this answer
    
You are right, rs must start in same column as con in previous line. It is weird rule. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jan 5 '09 at 11:52
    
Not weird: same syntactic level -> same indentation –  Svante Jan 5 '09 at 12:04
    
you can use braces to "break" out that rule –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 5 '09 at 14:05

@litb: You can rewrite con in way

palindrome :: [a] -> [a]
palindrome xs = con xs rs
    where con [] b = b
          con (x:xs) b = x:con xs b
          rs = rev xs []                       -- here
          rev [] rs = rs
          rev (x:xs) rs = rev xs (x:rs)

which is how ++ is implemented in prelude. My previous version is way how to write it in non lazy functional or logical languages in tail call fashion (e.g. Erlang).

share|improve this answer
    
I thought (++) was defined as (++) = flip $ foldr (:) - that's how I would've written it anyways. –  Cubic Apr 24 '12 at 15:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.