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Please help me with this code, it is making me crazy. This is a very simple program with 8-bit timer, cycling through all 8 leds (one-by-one). Am using ATSTK600 board.

My timers are working well, I think there is some problem with the loops (when I debug this program using avr studio-gcc, I can see all the leds working as I want but when I transfer it on board...leds don't blink). Am going crazy with this type of behavior.

Here is my code:

#include <avr/io.h>
#include <avr/interrupt.h>

volatile unsigned int intrs, i, j = 0;

void enable_ports(void);
void delay(void);

extern void __vector_23 (void) __attribute__ ((interrupt));

void enable_ports()
{
    DDRB = 0xff;

    TCCR0B = 0x03;

    TIMSK0 = 0x01;

    //TIFR0 = 0x01;

    TCNT0 = 0x00;

    //OCR0A = 61;

    intrs = 0;
}

void __vector_23 (void)
{
    for(i = 0; i<=8; i++)
    {
        while(1)
        {
            intrs++;
            if(intrs >= 61)
            {
                PORTB = (0xff<<i);
                intrs = 0;
                break;
            }

        }
    }
    PORTB = 0xff;
}

int main(void)
{
    enable_ports();
    sei();

    while(1)
    {

    }
}
share|improve this question
    
for(i = 0; i<=8; i++) this will loop 9 times, not 8. Don't know if that is (part of) the problem. –  pmg Nov 8 '10 at 22:08
1  
My guess is that it's just running too fast - try putting a scope on one of the LEDs and see if it's actually pulsing on and off - you probably just need to add a delay or change your timer interrupt frequency –  Paul R Nov 8 '10 at 22:08
    
ya, I understand for loop will loop 9 times (i did that because 8th leds never lite up so in order to check I wrote 9 but didn't see much difference). It might be running fast but I don't know how to add a delay or change frequency...I thought timer will take care of delay part????....I tried with clock settings. It would be a great help you can throw some light on this part. –  sneezy Nov 8 '10 at 22:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your interrupt routine is flawed. intrs counts only the number of times the loop has executed, not the number of timer interrupts as its name suggests. 61 iterations of that loop will take very little time. You will see nothing perceivable without an oscilloscope.

The following may be closer to what you need:

void __vector_23 (void)
{
    intrs++;
    if(intrs > 60)
    {
        intrs = 0;
        PORTB = (0xff<<i);

        i++ ;
        if(i == 8 )
        {
            i = 0 ;
            PORTB = 0xff;
        }
    }
}

Although setting the compare register OCR0A to 61 as in your commented out code would avoid the need for the interrupt counter and reduce unnecessary software overhead.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that solved this problem. But how? That am still thinking. I was a little close to your program. I was missing those 4 steps of yours from i++ to PORTB=0xff. Before posting this question, I wrote many versions of this code but none of them worked because of those 4 steps. I am still not clear on timers. Could you please explain your code again? OCR0A is required while comparing TCNT0, how that can reduce s/w overhead? Am pretty novice in this field that you can see from my level of programming. –  sneezy Nov 8 '10 at 23:48
    
Let me give it a try. It seems like you have the timer interrupt hooked up to the function __vector_23. Just remember that the interrupt will fire periodically every tick (whatever that is programmed to be; let's assume it is 1 sec in your case). And whenever that happens the function __vector_23 is invoked by the system. Now, to keep track of how much time has gone by, you just need to count the number of times the function is executed. [contd.] –  Ziffusion Nov 9 '10 at 1:41
1  
So, if you want to turn on the LEDs one tick at a time, every 60 ticks, you have to count till the function has been executed 60 times (60 ticks have elapsed) (which you do in intrs), and at that point, on every tick (each time the function is executed) count up the LED number (in i) and light up that LED. The tick after the last LED is lit up, you shut down all the LEDs by writing 0xFF in PORTB. –  Ziffusion Nov 9 '10 at 1:41
    
@sneezy: The best way to see how the code works is to step it in a debugger; place a break point in the interrupt handler and step through the function each time it is invoked. I think it is perhaps the concept of interrupts that you do not understand. Interrupts should run to completion (as quickly as possible), the presence of a while(1) in an interrupt handler (even with a break), or even a loop of any kind should ring alarm bells. –  Clifford Nov 9 '10 at 10:41
    
@sneezy:The 'software overhead' comes from processing 60 interrupts that do nothing instead of just one every 61 timer counts. The interrupt context switch takes time; that is CPU time that could be better spent doing real work in the main thread (which in your case does nothing at present). So the fewer 'dummy' interrupts you generate the more work you can do. Let the hardware do the counting, not the software. –  Clifford Nov 9 '10 at 10:46
  1. Are you sure that the code downloaded to the board is not optimized?
  2. Have you attached volatile attribute to the PORTB identifier?
  3. Is there a way for you to slow down the code (outside the debugger)? Any chance it's running but fast that you don't see it?
  4. Can you verify that your intended code is in fact running (outside the debugger)?
share|improve this answer
    
I did try to compile it with all the optimization settings but there is no difference in the way program runs on the board. I have an impression that timer acts as a delay function, am I correct? If I write a delay(500) function then this program will no longer be a timer driver program (is that correct?)...Timers & interrupts are taking a toll on me. –  sneezy Nov 8 '10 at 22:48
    
Oh, I was actually trying to recommend against optimization, because the compiler may decide that the assignments are meaningless and not do them at all. The timer that you are referring to is the interrupt vector, right? You should make sure that it's being called. A lot of setups will let you write to the console from within a interrupt vector (not printf). And by slowing down I meant delay between each write to PORTB. Maybe you can do a busy wait for some delay. What is the behavior if you run this through the debugger, but do not single step. Run it under debugger, but just let it go. –  Ziffusion Nov 8 '10 at 22:54

When interrupt occurs, handler very quickly counts 62*9 times and finally sets PORTB to 0x00, so leds do only very short flash which is not visible. You see it in sumulator just because it runs slower and do not emulate visual dimming effect of fast port switching. Program has a design flaw: it tries to do full blinking cycle in single interrupt. That's wrong--only a single step should be performed in interrupt call. So handler should look like this:

void __vector_23 (void)
{
    intrs++;
    if(intrs >= 61)
    {
        PORTB = (0xff<<i);
        intrs = 0;
        i++;
        if(i>8) i = 0;
    }
}

Try this.

There is guidelin on interrupts handlers: Interrupt handler should be as fast and short as possible. Do not perform complex tasks in interrupts (cycle loop is one of them, if you get cycle in interrupt, try to remove it). Do not wait or delay in interrupts.

share|improve this answer

If you're seeing the behaviour you want when debugging with avr studio-gcc, then that gives you some confidence that your program is "good" (for some sense of the word "good"). So it sounds as though you need to focus on a different area: what is the difference between your debug environment and your stand-alone download?

When doing a stand-alone download, do you know if your program is running at all?

Are the LEDs blinking, or turning on at all? You don't explicitly say in your question, but that question could be very relevant to the debugging process. Does it look like the right behaviour, running at a different speed? If so, then your program is probably not doing some sort of initialisation that the debugger was doing.

When doing a stand-alone download, is the program being compiled with different settings compared to the debug version? Perhaps compiler optimisation settings are changing your program's timing characteristics.

(Your question would be better if you gave more detail about what the stand-alone download is doing. In general, it is hard for someone to debug a remote system when they're given few or no details about what is happening. Do all/some of the LEDs turn on at all?)

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