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This is actually a solution to project euler problem #14 in F#. However, I'm running into a System.OutOfMemory exception when attempting to calculate an iterative sequence for larger numbers. As you can see, I'm writing my recursive function with tail calls.

I was running into a problem with StackOverFlowException because I was debugging in visual studio (which disables the tail calls). I've documented that in another question. Here, I'm running in release mode--but I'm getting out of memory exceptions when I run this as a console app (on windows xp with 4gb ram).

I'm really at a loss to understand how I coded myself into this memory overflow & hoping someone can show my the error in my ways.

let E14_interativeSequence x =

  let rec calc acc startNum =
    match startNum with
    | d when d = 1      -> List.rev (d::acc)
    | e when e%2 = 0    -> calc (e::acc) (e/2)
    | _                 -> calc (startNum::acc) (startNum * 3 + 1)

  let maxNum pl=

    let rec maxPairInternal acc pairList =
        match pairList with
        | []        ->  acc
        | x::xs     ->  if (snd x) > (snd acc) then maxPairInternal x xs
                        else maxPairInternal acc xs

    maxPairInternal (0,0) pl
    |> fst

  // if I lower this to like [2..99999] it will work.
  [2..99999] 
  |> List.map (fun n -> (n,(calc [] n)))
  |> List.map (fun pair -> ((fst pair), (List.length (snd pair))))
  |> maxNum
  |> (fun x-> Console.WriteLine(x))

EDIT

Given the suggestions via the answers, I rewrote to use a lazy list and also to use Int64's.

#r "FSharp.PowerPack.dll"

let E14_interativeSequence =

  let rec calc acc startNum =
    match startNum with
    | d when d = 1L         -> List.rev (d::acc) |> List.toSeq
    | e when e%2L = 0L      -> calc (e::acc) (e/2L)
    | _                     -> calc (startNum::acc) (startNum * 3L + 1L)

  let maxNum (lazyPairs:LazyList<System.Int64*System.Int64>) =

    let rec maxPairInternal acc (pairs:seq<System.Int64*System.Int64>) =
        match pairs with
        | :? LazyList<System.Int64*System.Int64> as p ->
            match p with
            | LazyList.Cons(x,xs)->  if (snd x) > (snd acc) then maxPairInternal x xs
                                     else maxPairInternal acc xs
            | _                         ->  acc
        | _ -> failwith("not a lazylist of pairs")

    maxPairInternal (0L,0L) lazyPairs
    |> fst

  {2L..999999L}
  |> Seq.map (fun n -> (n,(calc [] n)))
  |> Seq.map (fun pair -> ((fst pair), (Convert.ToInt64(Seq.length (snd pair)))))
  |> LazyList.ofSeq
  |> maxNum

which solves the problem. I'd also look at Yin Zhu's solution which is better, though.

share|improve this question
1  
As @Brian pointed out, Seq is better suited for this problem. Indeed, having worked through the first 45 problems in Project Euler, I found almost all of them are best suited for Seq-based solutions. If you're interested, here's my solution to problem 14: projecteulerfun.blogspot.com/2010/05/… (of course, you may want to wait to compare until after you've worked yours out to satisfaction, or you may be at the point where you're content with your algorithm but would like to see how a Seq-based implementation looks). –  Stephen Swensen Nov 9 '10 at 0:50
    
warning, there is at least one other problem besides the OutOfMemoryException with your solution which might be spoiled by looking at my solution. –  Stephen Swensen Nov 9 '10 at 0:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

As mentioned by Brian, List.* operations are not appropriate here. They cost too much memory.

The stackoverflow problem comes from another place. There are two possible for you to have stackoverflow: calc and maxPairInternal. It must be the first as the second has the same depth as the first. Then the problem comes to the numbers, the number in 3n+1 problem could easily go to very large. So you first get a int32 overflow, then you get a stackoverflow. That's the reason. After changing the numbers to 64bit, the program works.

Here is my solution page, where you can see a memoization trick.

open System
let E14_interativeSequence x =

  let rec calc acc startNum =
    match startNum with
    | d when d = 1L      -> List.rev (d::acc)
    | e when e%2L = 0L    -> calc (e::acc) (e/2L)
    | _                 -> calc (startNum::acc) (startNum * 3L + 1L)

  let maxNum pl=

    let rec maxPairInternal acc pairList =
        match pairList with
        | []        ->  acc
        | x::xs     ->  if (snd x) > (snd acc) then maxPairInternal x xs
                        else maxPairInternal acc xs

    maxPairInternal (0L,0) pl
    |> fst

  // if I lower this to like [2..99999] it will work.
  [2L..1000000L] 
  |> Seq.map (fun n -> (n,(calc [] n)))
  |> Seq.maxBy (fun (n, lst) -> List.length lst)
  |> (fun x-> Console.WriteLine(x))
share|improve this answer
    
+1 good catch @Yin. I had noted the presence of the int32 overflow in the OP's code, but didn't make the connection to the out of memory exception; when I faced the same flaw in my own solution, it resulted in non-termination since my strategy didn't involve actually constructing collatz chains, rather just counting their lengths. –  Stephen Swensen Nov 9 '10 at 2:16
    
yea. I wouldn't have figured it out. . . –  Kevin Won Nov 9 '10 at 2:36
3  
@Kevin Won: if you suspect, or want to test for, integer overflow happening in your code, add open Microsoft.FSharp.Core.Operators.Checked to your script. This replaces integer operators with ones that throw when they overflow. It makes your calculations (slightly) slower, so don't forget to remove it when it isn't needed anymore. –  cfern Nov 9 '10 at 7:52
    
@cfern: nice. I didn't know that. –  Kevin Won Nov 9 '10 at 17:50

If you change List.map to Seq.map (and re-work maxPairInternal to iterate over a seq) that will probably help tons. Right now, you're manifesting all the data at once in a giant structure before processing the whole structure to get a single number result. It is much better to do this lazily via Seq, and just create one row, and compare it with the next row, and create a single row at a time and then discard it.

I don't have time to code my suggestion now, but let me know if you are still having trouble and I'll revisit this.

share|improve this answer

Stop trying to use lists everywhere, this isn't Haskell! And stop writing fst pair and snd pair everywhere, this isn't Lisp!

If you want a simple solution in F# you can do it directly like this without creating any intermediate data structures:

let rec f = function
  | 1L -> 0
  | n when n % 2L = 0L -> 1 + f(n / 2L)
  | n -> 1 + f(3L * n + 1L)

let rec g (li, i) = function
  | 1L -> i
  | n -> g (max (li, i) (f n, n)) (n - 1L)

let euler14 n = g (0, 1L) n

That takes around 15s on my netbook. If you want something more time efficient, reuse previous results via an array:

let rec inside (a : _ array) n =
  if n <= 1L || a.[int n] > 0s then a.[int n] else
    let p =
      if n &&& 1L = 0L then inside a (n >>> 1) else
        let n = 3L*n + 1L
        if n < int64 a.Length then inside a n else outside a n
    a.[int n] <- 1s + p
    1s + p
and outside (a : _ array) n =
  let n = if n &&& 1L = 0L then n >>> 1 else 3L*n + 1L
  1s + if n < int64 a.Length then inside a n else outside a n

let euler14 n =
  let a = Array.create (n+1) 0s
  let a = Array.Parallel.init (n+1) (fun n -> inside a (int64 n))
  let i = Array.findIndex (Array.reduce max a |> (=)) a
  i, a.[i]

That takes around 0.2s on my netbook.

share|improve this answer
    
wow. called to task! –  Kevin Won Nov 16 '10 at 21:20
    
@jon: outside of style prefs, what are the reasons why you object to Lists and pair functions? I'm trying to understand your perspective & why you think that my solve is an abuse. While F# certainly isn't Haskell or Lisp, it certainly has a lineage that draws on both parents. –  Kevin Won Nov 18 '10 at 0:11
    
Lists can be a great collection when there are few (preferably zero) elements, particularly in the context of logic programming, but that is not the case here so they are not suitable in this case. The fst and snd functions are almost always better avoided in favor of pattern matching. –  Jon Harrop Nov 18 '10 at 13:32
2  
Instead of writing d when d=1 (which looks like COND in Lisp) you should simply write the pattern 1. Don't give startNum the aliases d and e, it is confusing, use the same name throughout. Replace x::xs -> if (snd x) > .. with (_, v as x)::xs -> if v > ... Replace fun pair -> ((fst pair), (List.length (snd pair))) with fun (k, v) -> k, List.length v, removing the superfluous parentheses as well as the unnecessary and inefficient fst and snd leaving shorter and faster code. –  Jon Harrop Nov 18 '10 at 13:39
1  
Never build big lists of anything, particularly consecutive ints like [2..99999]. Deforest your pipelines. Don't eagerly build arbitrarily-long lists just to count their lengths. Never introduce unnecessary run-time type tests. Lazy lists are virtually useless in practice so you'd need a compelling reason to pull them in and, in this case, they have only served to mask the underlying problems with your approach. –  Jon Harrop Nov 19 '10 at 0:53

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