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Here's a simplified version of my table.

CREATE TABLE TBLAGENT(AGENTID NUMBER, NUMBERSENT NUMBER, AGENTNAME VARCHAR2(100));
INSERT INTO TBLAGENT VALUES(100,NULL,'KNIGHT');
INSERT INTO TBLAGENT VALUES(200,NULL,'SUPES');
INSERT INTO TBLAGENT VALUES(300,NULL,'SPIDEY');

CREATE TABLE TBLSERVICES(AGENTID NUMBER, SERVICES NUMBER);
INSERT INTO TBLSERVICES VALUES(100,44);
INSERT INTO TBLSERVICES VALUES(200,13);
INSERT INTO TBLSERVICES VALUES(300,24);
INSERT INTO TBLSERVICES VALUES(100,34);
INSERT INTO TBLSERVICES VALUES(200,13);
INSERT INTO TBLSERVICES VALUES(300,24);

SELECT TA.AGENTID, SUM(SERVICES), TA.AGENTNAME, TA.NUMBERSENT 
       FROM TBLAGENT TA, TBLSERVICES TS
       WHERE TA.AGENTID = TS.AGENTID
       GROUP BY TA.AGENTID, TA.AGENTNAME, TA.NUMBERSENT

The requirement is to update the NUMBERSENT column in the tblAgent table with the SUM(Services) from tblServices table.

I came up with this update statement.

/*Works*/
UPDATE tblagent t
   SET t.numbersent =
       (SELECT SUM(services)
          FROM tblservices x
         WHERE t.agentid = x.agentid
         GROUP BY x.agentid)

When I change the syntax of this statement to INNER JOIN syntax, it fails.

/*Throws an error*/
UPDATE tblagent t
   SET t.numbersent =
       (SELECT SUM(services)
          FROM tblservices x INNER JOIN tblAgent t
         ON t.agentid = x.agentid
         GROUP BY x.agentid)

This throws up an error ORA-01427: single-row subquery returns more than one row

Why would the second statement throw an error?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

@Tony Andrews is right and if you still want to use INNER JOIN you should write this:

 UPDATE tblagent t1
   SET t1.numbersent =
       (SELECT SUM(services)
          FROM tblservices x INNER JOIN tblAgent t
         ON t.agentid = x.agentid
         GROUP BY x.agentid
         having t1.agentid = x.agentid)

(To have upper and inner DML one common column,for not to return more than one row)

But of course I think this is just complicating your job and nothing more..Use the first variant...This is better Advice.

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Did you try running the subquery by itself to make sure it only returns one row?

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+1. It's a pretty self-explanatory error message... the subquery needs to return one row and it's returning more than one. –  ceejayoz Nov 8 '10 at 22:14

Let's look at how the 2 queries work in more detail:

First, the one that works:

/*Works*/
UPDATE tblagent t
   SET t.numbersent =
       (SELECT SUM(services)
          FROM tblservices x
         WHERE t.agentid = x.agentid
         GROUP BY x.agentid)

Clearly the subquery must return a single value to use in the SET, so let's look at that on its own:

        SELECT SUM(services)
          FROM tblservices x
         WHERE t.agentid = x.agentid
         GROUP BY x.agentid

Note that the "t" alias here correlates the subquery to the outer query - i.e. it has one specific value when the subquery is evaluated e.g.

        SELECT SUM(services)
          FROM tblservices x
         WHERE 123 = x.agentid
         GROUP BY x.agentid

Therefore, although the query groups results by x.agentid, there is only in fact one x.agentid value i.e. the current value of t.agentid (e.g. 123). So this works.

Now look at the second query's subquery on its own:

       SELECT SUM(services)
         FROM tblservices x INNER JOIN tblAgent t
           ON t.agentid = x.agentid
       GROUP BY x.agentid

This time t.agentid is not a reference to the outer query, so this query is not correlated to the outer query. It can return more than 1 row (just run it and see), and thus cannot be safely used in the SET clause of the outer query.

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You reassign t with the INNER JOIN, so the outer t is not linked to the UPDATE any more.

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Yep, there are two unrelated uses of the tblAgent table. –  Gary Myers Nov 8 '10 at 22:45

Actually now that I think about it, the first version is a correlated subquery, the second one is not. Without data to try it with I couldn't tell you but that probably has something to do with it.

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You have two rows in tblAgent with the same agentid. This might have escaped your notice if there are no where agentid is NULL.

To check:

select * from
(
    SELECT count(*) c, agentid from tblAgent group by agentid
) x
where x.c > 1

If any rows come back, that's your problem.

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Shouldn't that be

(SELECT x.agentid, SUM(services)
      FROM tblservices x INNER JOIN tblAgent t
     ON t.agentid = x.agentid
     GROUP BY x.agentid)

if you're joining by agentid, or

(SELECT  SUM(services)
      FROM tblservices x INNER JOIN tblAgent t
     ON t.agentid = x.agentid
     )

if you're not?

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No. The subquery should be returning just the SUM(Services). –  abhi Nov 8 '10 at 22:14
    
...which is what the second subquery does. –  SteveCav Nov 8 '10 at 22:57

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