Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote this snippet of code and I assume len is tail-recursive, but a stack overflow still occurs. What is wrong?

myLength :: [a] -> Integer

myLength xs = len xs 0
    where len [] l = l
          len (x:xs) l = len xs (l+1)

main = print $ myLength [1..10000000]
share|improve this question
5  
I just wanted to note -- this is a very good question. Lazy evaluation has interesting side-effects that might not be immediately obvious to all programmers. –  jrockway Mar 10 '09 at 17:15
7  
Yeah, working in Haskell versus other non-pure functional languages, you realize that stupid tricks like rewriting for tail-recursion is often unnecessary or harmful, and you should instead spend your efforts concentrating on what really needs to be evaluated. –  ephemient Jun 20 '09 at 17:52
6  
@ephemient - you are dunno. Well write straightforward version myLength [] = 0 \nmyLength (x:xs) = 1 + myLength xs and what will be result? Runtime error! Great! And now you must concentrate your effort why this super-duper pure functional language doesn't work. Practice usability, it is what ever counts. When program fails for trivial task, than you must work with those stupid tricks. Ten million integers, it is less than 100MB on 32b architecture and you can't count it? WTF? Go out the school desk and come to real world. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jun 22 '09 at 11:11
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Remember that Haskell is lazy. Your computation (l+1) will not occur until it's absolutely necessary.

The 'easy' fix is to use '$!' to force evaluation:

myLength :: [a] -> Integer
myLength xs = len xs 0
where len [] l = l
      len (x:xs) l = len xs $! (l+1)

      main = print $ myLength [1..10000000]
share|improve this answer
add comment

Seems like laziness causes len to build thunk:

len [1..100000] 0
-> len [2..100000] (0+1)
-> len [3..100000] (0+1+1)

and so on. You must force len to reduce l every time:

len (x:xs) l = l `seq` len xs (l+1)

For more information, look http://haskell.org/haskellwiki/Stack_overflow.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't find what seq do. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jan 5 '09 at 13:47
    
Heh, I found it, it force l to evaluate so in next recursion thunk (l+1) is evaluated before next len apply. It's not so much easy to read and understand. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jan 5 '09 at 14:25
2  
In fact that page links to a page which answers the question exactly: haskell.org/haskellwiki/Performance/Accumulating_parameter . –  slim Jan 12 '09 at 15:35
add comment

The foldl carries the same problem; it builds a thunk. You can use foldl' from Data.List to avoid that problem:

import Data.List
myLength = foldl' (const.succ) 0

The only difference between foldl and foldl' is the strict accumulation, so foldl' solves the problem in the same way as the seq and $! examples above. (const.succ) here works the same as (\a b -> a+1), though succ has a less restrictive type.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Just so you know, there's a much easier way to write this function:

myLength xs = foldl step 0 xs where step acc x = acc + 1

Alex

share|improve this answer
    
myLength = foldl (+) 0 is also the same, although it takes more sophisticated reasoning to prove it. The optimizer will make it efficient, so there's no need to explicitly tail recurse. –  luqui Jan 6 '09 at 2:08
    
You are not right: *Main> foldl (+) 0 [1..1000000] *** Exception: stack overflow –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jan 6 '09 at 8:00
4  
And wrong result also, you sum list instead *Main> foldl (+) 0 [1..10] => 55 –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jan 6 '09 at 8:05
    
That can be fixed using foldl', which is strict version of foldl. –  mattiast Feb 1 '09 at 18:49
add comment

eelco.lempsink.nl answers the question you asked. Here's a demonstration of Yann's answer:

module Main
    where

import Data.List
import System.Environment (getArgs)

main = do
  n <- getArgs >>= readIO.head
  putStrLn $ "Length of an array from 1 to " ++ show n
               ++ ": " ++ show (myLength [1..n])

myLength :: [a] -> Int
myLength = foldl' (const . succ) 0

foldl' goes through the list from left to right each time adding 1 to an accumulator which starts at 0.

Here's an example of running the program:


C:\haskell>ghc --make Test.hs -O2 -fforce-recomp
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( Test.hs, Test.o )
Linking Test.exe ...

C:\haskell>Test.exe 10000000 +RTS -sstderr
Test.exe 10000000 +RTS -sstderr

Length of an array from 1 to 10000000: 10000000
     401,572,536 bytes allocated in the heap
          18,048 bytes copied during GC
           2,352 bytes maximum residency (1 sample(s))
          13,764 bytes maximum slop
               1 MB total memory in use (0 MB lost due to fragmentation)

  Generation 0:   765 collections,     0 parallel,  0.00s,  0.00s elapsed
  Generation 1:     1 collections,     0 parallel,  0.00s,  0.00s elapsed

  INIT  time    0.00s  (  0.00s elapsed)
  MUT   time    0.27s  (  0.28s elapsed)
  GC    time    0.00s  (  0.00s elapsed)
  EXIT  time    0.00s  (  0.00s elapsed)
  Total time    0.27s  (  0.28s elapsed)

  %GC time       0.0%  (0.7% elapsed)

  Alloc rate    1,514,219,539 bytes per MUT second

  Productivity 100.0% of total user, 93.7% of total elapsed


C:\haskell>
share|improve this answer
add comment

The simplest solution to your problem is turning on optimization.

I have your source in a file called tail.hs.

jmg$ ghc --make tail.hs -fforce-recomp
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( tail.hs, tail.o )
Linking tail ...
jmg$ ./tail 
Stack space overflow: current size 8388608 bytes.
Use `+RTS -Ksize -RTS' to increase it.
girard:haskell jmg$ ghc -O --make tail.hs -fforce-recomp
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( tail.hs, tail.o )
Linking tail ...
jmg$ ./tail 
10000000
jmg$ 

@Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil The tests above were done on Mac OS X Snow Leopard 64bit with a GHC 7 and GHC 6.12.1, each in a 32 bit version. After you're downvote, I repeated this experiment on Ubuntu Linux with the following result:

jmg@girard:/tmp$ cat length.hs
myLength :: [a] -> Integer

myLength xs = len xs 0
    where len [] l = l
          len (x:xs) l = len xs (l+1)

main = print $ myLength [1..10000000]

jmg@girard:/tmp$ ghc --version
The Glorious Glasgow Haskell Compilation System, version 6.12.1
jmg@girard:/tmp$ uname -a
Linux girard 2.6.35-24-generic #42-Ubuntu SMP Thu Dec 2 02:41:37 UTC 2010 x86_64 GNU/Linux
jmg@girard:/tmp$ ghc --make length.hs -fforce-recomp
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( length.hs, length.o )
Linking length ...
jmg@girard:/tmp$ time ./length 
Stack space overflow: current size 8388608 bytes.
Use `+RTS -Ksize -RTS' to increase it.

real    0m1.359s
user    0m1.140s
sys 0m0.210s
jmg@girard:/tmp$ ghc -O --make length.hs -fforce-recomp
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( length.hs, length.o )
Linking length ...
jmg@girard:/tmp$ time ./length 
10000000

real    0m0.268s
user    0m0.260s
sys 0m0.000s
jmg@girard:/tmp$ 

So, if you're interested we can continue to find out what is the reason, that this fails for you. I guess, GHC HQ, would accept it as a bug, if such a straight forward recursion over lists is not optimized into an efficient loop in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
It fails with code from mine question with version 6.12.1 $ ghc -O --make length.hs -fforce-recomp [1 of 1] Compiling Main ( length.hs, length.o ) Linking length ... hynek@hynek:~/work/haskell$ ./length Stack space overflow: current size 8388608 bytes. Use +RTS -Ksize -RTS' to increase it.` –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Jan 19 '11 at 10:50
    
I've used exactly your code, see my edited answer. –  jmg Jan 21 '11 at 16:34
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.