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i currently have a Java Observer/Observable setup in which i switch on some field within the Object parameter of Observer.update (e.g. event id) to determine how to handle an Observable notification.

this creates verbose code like:

public void update (Observable o, Object arg) {
    if (arg instanceof Event) {
        switch (((Event)arg).getID()) {
            case EVENT_TYPE_A:
                // do stuff...
                break;
            case EVENT_TYPE_B:
                // do stuff...
                break;
            case EVENT_TYPE_C:
                // do stuff...
                break;
        }
    }
}

coming from an ActionScript background, this feels unnecessarily verbose to me...instead of passing an instance of an Observer, i'd prefer to pass a callback method to be called directly by the Observable (more specifically, by a subclass). however, i'm not clear how to determine the object on which the method should be invoked (the class instance that 'owns' the method).

i could pass a reference to the instance enclosing the method, but this smells like bad OOP.

am i barking up the wrong tree? or is there a clean way to achieve this?

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I see your dilemma; this is not the observer pattern. See stackoverflow.com/questions/5423125/… –  J T Apr 2 '11 at 1:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A cleaner implementation would involve removing the logic of whether the event can be handled by the observer/observable, to the actual observer/observable itself. It appears as if ActionScript has left you with a funny idea about the Observer pattern. Observe (no-pun-intended):

public interface Observer{

  public void update( Event arg );
}

public class Event{

  public int ID;
}

public Button implements Observer{

  public void update ( Event arg ){

     switch (arg.ID){

       case 1:  //Buttonsy handle events of type 1
         //do something useful;
         break;
       default:
         System.out.println("Buttons don't handle events of ID: " + arg.ID);
         break;
     }
  }
}

public ProgressBar implements Observer{

  public void update ( Event arg ){

     switch (arg.ID){

       case 2: //ProgressBars handle events of type 2 and 3
         //do something useful;
         break;
       case 3:
         //do something else useful;
         break;
       default:
         System.out.println("Progress bars don't handle events of ID: " + arg.ID);
         break;
     }
  }
}


public class Subject{

 private ArrayList<Observer> allUIControls;

 public registerControl( Observer control ){

   allUIControls.add( control );
 }

 public void updateControls ( Event arg ) {

   foreach ( Observer control in allUIControls ){

     //pass the event to each UI control, and let the EVENT decide if it can understand the Event.ID
     //its not the job of Subject to decide if the Observer is fit to handle the event. THIS IS NOT THE OBSERVER pattern.
     control.update( arg );
   }
 }
}
share|improve this answer
    
yeah, this is where i'm at right now. i can live with the switches in the Observers' event handlers. it's just a somewhat different paradigm than ActionScript's; i see the pros and cons of each. –  ericsoco Apr 2 '11 at 4:53

This may be a little far out in left-field, but since Java 5 and up have generics, both the traditional observer and listener patterns seem a little bit dated. That is to say, types are the lingua-fraca of java these days. Events with integer IDs exist principally because switch statements against constants are extremely efficient - at the expense of readability and often requiring casts to do anything useful (you may know that if the ID = 23, the Object must be a MouseEvent, but it is nicer and safer if you let the compiler and runtime type information take care of this for you). On a modern machine in a modern JVM, the efficiency may not be worth it.

So, if you are not married to IDs and the traditional observer pattern, you might consider something like this:

public abstract class Observer<T> {
  private final Class<T> type;

  protected Observer(Class<T> type) {
    this.type = type;
  }

  //implement this method;  if it returns false, the event (object) 
  //is "consumed" and no other observers should be called
  public abstract boolean onEvent(T instance);

  protected final boolean matches(Object obj) {
    return type.isInstance(obj);
  }

  Boolean maybeDispatch(Object o) {
    if (matches(o)) {
      return onEvent(type.cast(o));
    }
    return null;
  }
}

This gets us (literally) a generic Observer of events; we switch on the type of the object passed in like this:

public class Bus {
  private final List<Observer<?>> observers = new ArrayList<Observer<?>>();

  public void registerObserver(Observer<?> observer) {
    observers.add(observer);
  }

  public <T> void onEvent(T t) {
    Boolean keepGoing;
    for (Observer<?> obs : observers) {
      keepGoing = obs.maybeDispatch(t);
      if (keepGoing != null && !keepGoing.booleanValue()) {
        break;
      }
    }
  }
}

The resulting code is (marginally) less efficient, but writing a subclass of such an "observer" is infinitely more readable. It does not look much like the traditional observer pattern, but is functionally equivalent.

If you still need an additional "event" parameter, you can just do similar logic to parameterize on two types.

share|improve this answer
    
hm, very interesting...for now, i'd like to stick with Java's Observer, but this seems like a good candidate for later re-architecting. i'm still a bit of a java noob (in case you hadn't guessed) and generics are new to me, tho i've used them along with the Collections framework. but i'm starting to get a sense of the flexibility they bring, while still maintaining type safety and compile-time goodness... –  ericsoco Apr 6 '11 at 5:32

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