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I have a complicated algorithm that updates 3 histograms that are stored in arrays. I want to debug my algorithm, so I was thinking of showing the arrays as histograms in a user interface. What is the easiest way to do this. (Rapid application development is more important than optimized code.)

I have some experience with Qt (in C++) and some experience with matplotlib.

(I'm going to leave this question open for a day or two because it's hard for me to evaluate the solutions without a lot more experience that I don't have. Hopefully, the community's votes will help choose the best answer.)

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2  
@Neil: There is an example of making an animated graph here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4098131/matplotlib-update-a-plot/… . Perhaps that will help you? –  unutbu Nov 9 '10 at 1:54
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@unutbu nice +1, why didn't you put as an answer? –  Bernardo Kyotoku Nov 9 '10 at 2:05
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@Bernardo: It's Joe Kington's answer, so he deserves the credit :) –  unutbu Nov 9 '10 at 2:15
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@unutbu Please add it as he's not here to add it. Anyway, you deserve the credit for reading the question and making the connection. –  Neil G Nov 9 '10 at 2:24
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@unutbu, Thank you. –  Neil G Nov 9 '10 at 2:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Edit: Nowadays, it is easier and better to use matplotlib.animation:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.animation as animation


def animate(frameno):
    x = mu + sigma * np.random.randn(10000)
    n, _ = np.histogram(x, bins, normed=True)
    for rect, h in zip(patches, n):
        rect.set_height(h)

mu, sigma = 100, 15
fig, ax = plt.subplots()
x = mu + sigma * np.random.randn(10000)
n, bins, patches = plt.hist(x, 50, normed=1, facecolor='green', alpha=0.75)

ani = animation.FuncAnimation(fig, animate, blit=False, interval=10,
                              repeat=True)
plt.show()

There is an example of making an animated graph here. Building on this example, you might try something like:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

plt.ion()
mu, sigma = 100, 15
fig = plt.figure()
x = mu + sigma*np.random.randn(10000)
n, bins, patches = plt.hist(x, 50, normed=1, facecolor='green', alpha=0.75)
for i in range(50):
    x = mu + sigma*np.random.randn(10000)
    n, bins = np.histogram(x, bins, normed=True)
    for rect,h in zip(patches,n):
        rect.set_height(h)
    fig.canvas.draw()

I can get about 14 frames per second this way, compared to 4 frames per second using the code I first posted. The trick is to avoid asking matplotlib to draw complete figures. Instead call plt.hist once, then manipulate the existing matplotlib.patches.Rectangles in patches to update the histogram, and call fig.canvas.draw() to make the updates visible.

For those who'd like to compare, here is the original code I posted:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

plt.ion()
mu, sigma = 100, 15
for i in range(50):
    x = mu + sigma*np.random.randn(10000)
    n, bins, patches = plt.hist(x, 50, normed=1, facecolor='green', alpha=0.75)
    plt.draw()
    plt.clf()
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This works well but the plotting window turns not responding or closes on its own.. any suggestion? –  DevC Feb 12 at 12:45
    
@DevC: Nowadays, it is better to use matplotlib.animation. I've added an example, above. –  unutbu Feb 12 at 13:05
    
Here you can find example animation videos: jakevdp.github.io/blog/2012/08/18/matplotlib-animation-tutorial –  kakyo Sep 10 at 20:29

For realtime plotting, I recommend trying Chaco, pyqtgraph, or any of the opengl-based libraries like glumpy or visvis. Matplotlib, wonderful as it is, is generally not suitable for this kind of application.

Edit: the developers of glumpy, visvis, galry, and pyqtgraph are all collaborating on a visualization library called vispy. It is still early in development, but promising and already quite powerful.

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The vispy website includes a gallery of several applications and the code corresponding to these applications. –  Mark yesterday

I recommend using matplotlib in interactive mode, if you call .show once then it will pop up in its own window, if you don't then it exists only in memory and can be written to a file when you're done with it.

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Ouh, now see, when you say real time you mean you want a refresh rate higher than 5 Hz matplotlib won't do the job. I had this problem before, I went for PyQwt that works with PyQt.

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1  
PyQwt is currently considered unmaintained. Hopefully that will change in the future, but beware for now.. –  Luke Feb 9 '13 at 21:19

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